The person subjected to undue influence, or his legal representative, may avoid the transaction and recover what he has parted with.1 Thus a guardian2

Trull v. Eastman, 44 Mass. (3 Met.) 121, 37 Am. Dec. 126.

3O'Rorke v. Bolingbroke, L. R. 2 App. 814. 4 Williams v. Williams, L. R. 2 Ch. 294.

5 37 U. S. (12 Pet.) 241, 9 L. ed. 1070.

6 See Sec. 447.

7Cole v. Gibbons, 3 P. Wms. 290.

1United States. Sturm v. Stump, 239 Fed. 749.

Indiana. Tucker v. Roach, 139 Ind. 275, 38 N. E. 822.

Kentucky. Wiley v. Wiley, 178 Ky. 501, 199 S. W. 47.

Massachusetts. Campbell v. Lima, 212 Mass. 11, 98 N. E. 610.

Missouri. Youtsey v. Hollmgsworth (Mo.). 178 S. W. 105.

New Hampshire. Curtice v. Dixon, 74 N. H. 386, 68 Atl. 587.

Pennsylvania. Heckman v. Heck-man, 215 Pa. St. 203, 114 Am. St. Rep. 953, 64 Atl. 425.

2 Somes v. Skinner, 16 Mass. 348.

Ordinarily a conveyance or contract executed under undue influence must be avoided in toto, if at all. If, however, the grantor wishes a life estate reserved to him and the remainder to pass to the grantee, the grantee will be required to execute a declaration of trust.7