Under some statutes natural love and affection are made a sufficient consideration. This result has been reached under a statute providing that " natural duty and affection" shall be a consideration.1 Such language is said to be equivalent to a "strong moral obligation."2 Under such a statute a child's affection for a dependent parent and a child's feeling of duty are said to be a sufficient consideration for a promise by which such child promises to pay for the support of such parent.3 The contract in this case, however, was a contract between all the children of such parent whereby they agreed to pay a certain sum of money each month to the child with whom such parent might choose to live for her support.4 Sufficient consideration could be found in the mutual promises of the children, each for the other, without invoking the doctrine of natural love and affection.5

1 Ray v. Hallenbeck, 42 Fed. 381.

2Bonham v. Newcomb, 2 Vent. 364, note; Watts v. Bullas, 1 P. Wms. 60. (A conveyance to a half-brother.) Hut-sell v. Crewse, 138 Mo. 1, 39 S. W. 449; Crawley v. Crafton, 193 Mo. 421, 91 S. W. 1027; Partridge v. Partridge, 220 Mo. 321, 119 S. W. 415; Pickett v. Garrard, 131 N. Car. 195, 42 S. E. 579.

3Conover v. Brown, 49 N. J. Eq. 156, 23 Atl. 507.

4Antrobus v. Smith, 12 Ves. 46.

See also, Holloway v. Headington, 8 Sim. 324; Walrond v. Walrond, 1 Johns 18.

5Fothergill v. Fothergill, Freera. 256; Watts v. Bullas, 1 P. Wms. 60.

6Arkansas. Smith v. Smith, 80 Ark. 458, 97 S. W. 439.

Florida. Triesback v. Tyler, 62 Fla. 580, 56 So. 947.

Illinois. Strayer v. Dickereon, 205 111. 257, 68 N. E. 767.

Missouri. Mudd v. Dillon, 166 Mo. 110, 95 S. W. 973.

Oregon. Langley v. Kealer, 57 Or. 281, 110 Pac. 401 [rehearing denied, 57 Or. 281, 111 Pac. 246].

Wisconsin. Willey v. Hodge, 104 Wis. 81, 76 Am. St. Rep. 852, 80 N. W. 75.

1 Worth v. Daniel, 1 Ga. App. 15, 57

S.E. 898.