An English measure of capacity, which, until recently, varied considerably with the kind of goods measured by it; thus -

The gallon

wine measure

contained

231

cubical inches.

Ditto

beer measure,

"

282

"

Ditto

dry measure,

"

268 4/5

"

But by an Act of Parliament passed in 1824, it was altered on the 1st of May, 1825, to an uniform measure called the imperial standard gallon. By that act it was determined to be such measure as "shall contain ten pounds avoirdupois of distilled water, weighed in air at the temperature of 62° Fahr., and the barometer at 30 inches; and such measure is declared to be the " Imperial Standard Gallon," and shall be the unit and only standard measure of capacity to be used, as well for wine, beer, ale, spirits, and all sorts of liquids, as for dry goods not measured by heap measure; and that all other measures shall be taken in parts or multiples of the said imperial standard gallon, the quart being the fourth part of such gallon, and the pint one-eighth part; two such gallons making a peck, eight such gallons a bushel, and eight such bushels a quarter of corn, or other dry goods not measured by heaped measure.