The fowls enter the house from the yards by the side doorway already described, which they reach by means of a ladder made of a plank, with half a dozen steps of beading 4 or 5 in. apart. If a staple be driven through the plank and the flap d, a peg will suffice to keep both in position; by withdrawing the peg, the flap falls and the dry shed is closed in, whilst the ladder remains in its proper place. With regard to the yards, the uprights are of 2 1/2-in. by l 1/2-in. quartering, mortised into a bed of 3-in. by 3-in. stuff. The rafters are 2 in. by 1 1/2 in. The wire below is 1-in. mesh nailed to a plank 1 ft. high. For the remaining portion of the runs, l 1/2-in. mesh netting is used. A door is at each extremity. Following is a statement of the actual cost of materials required for the combined pigeon and poultry house, exclusive of the yards: -

s.

a.

Quartering............

0

18

0

Odd planking.............

0

2

6

Bricks and Lime..............

0

3

6

Wood (beading) ............

0

2

0

Hinges ......

0

6

2

Zinc for Roofing.............

0

14

0

Match-lining...............

1

14

6

Glass................

0

1

9

Paint.................

0

14

0

Nails and Screws.................

0

3

7

5

0

0

The same writer in Amateur Work suggests a useful adjunct to the preceding arrangement, for the breeding season, to supply the following demands: (1) secluded spots for sitting hens, the nests placed on the ground, so that the eggs may benefit by the natural moisture of the earth; (2) dry runs for young chickens, in which they may be housed with the mother hen during wet or windy weather; (3) dust bath and ash box for the growing broods, chickens being particularly plagued by insects; (4) coops for fattening cockerels for killing. For pigeons, the most pressing demands are : (1) pairing pens; (2) hospital quarters for lame birds; (3) cages for prize pigeons, or valuable specimens. To supply these requisitions, if the articles be purchased separately from makers, must entail considerable outlay; while for the homo construction of a suitable contrivance, the cost for material should not exceed 15s.

Fig. 607 is a sketch of the completed house. Tier a is a portion allotted to pig and as the flooring does not extend for more than | of the length the birds can readily obtain access to it from below, where on tier b they are provided with a run, partly roofed, and a compartment in which to nest, reached by holes, and placed within command of the owner by means of a door on the outside. The remaining lower half of the house is apportioned to chickens. On tier c are two boxes - one containing lime and loam, the other cinder-ashes and calcined bones. These boxes are easily lifted, and as they serve to roof over the run underneath, means of reaching the innermost recesses of that part are at once at hand. The sketch represents this lower run shut in by 2 flaps d e. Behind the front and larger flap d galvanized wirework is permanently fastened. In the case of the smaller flap e, this wirework is stretched on a frame swinging from above, and so arranged that, fastened back at an ascertained angle, the chickens find room for free ingress and egress under it, whilst the hen is not permitted to have her liberty, the aperture not allowing of her escape.

In fine weather, both the outer flaps are opened, thus allowing the light to enter the run, and in themselves providing platforms, of which the chickens avail themselves when basking in the sunlight. Closed, the flaps effectually exclude wind and wet, and render the quarters warm and secure; and again, when both are fastened down, there is ample room for 2 broody hens, which do not appreciate too much light, and require to sit on the soil. The same space may be converted into fattening pens for cockerels whenever occasion arises.

In the construction of the house, the measurements were decided with special reference to the economical use of wood as purchased in small quantities at a timber yard. The framework is formed of quartering 1 1/2 in. sq. obtainable retail in lengths of 12 ft., at 5d. per length. Fig. 608 gives an idea of the skeleton of the whole, and Fig. 609 depicts a frame, of which it is necessary to make 2 - one for each end of the house, which is 6 ft. in height and 2 ft. in depth, the length and breadth of the frame. The frames, stood up on end, 4 ft. apart, are braced together on either side by widths of quartering, put 18 in. from top and bottom. As to how the frames are made, Fig. 610 represents the bottom corner, a being the detached pieces of wood before they are screwed together. Fig. 611 in the same way shows the cross-bar mortice. Fig. 612 gives a portion of the left-hand corner of the entire skeleton, a being the cross braces, 4 ft. in length, and b the bar bisecting the frame shown in the smaller sketch in Fig. 608. All the joints are of the simplest mortice; they are quite good enough for the purpose in view, for every board hereafter added to the structure increases its stability.

Order 5 lengths of quartering, and these can be cut to the required measurements with a minimum of waste.

Poultry And Pigeon Houses Part 5 606Poultry And Pigeon Houses Part 5 607

In Figs. 607 and 60S on tier c in the skeleton sketch, 4 short cross pieces connecting the lower pair of braces are shown. These can be of 3/4-in. wood 2 in. wide, and 2 similar pieces can be nailed on the top of the frames from corner to corner, as an additional stay; 2 lengths will afford sufficient stuff. With the framework thus erected, the braces on tier a will form joists for the flooring, which is to go 2/3 only, or length of the compartment. This flooring consists of pieces of 3/4-in. match-lining, 6 in. wide. The rabbet and groove arrangement locks the several boards into one safe whole, which answers the double purpose - that of a roof to the nests below, and of a platform upon which the pigeons parade in the sunshine. To maintain a rapid disposal of rain-water, give this platform an incline from left to right, which may be done by nailing a tapering fillet of wood upon one end of the joists. The same plan serves for the flooring below, which, in its turn, protects the ash-box and dust-bath beneath; in this case, the floor boards run lengthways instead of across, and the fillet without, being tapered, must be attached to the cross bar of the left-hand frame.