In Fig. 300, let X A. G H be the elevation of an urn to be constructed in twelve pieces. The elevation must be drawn bo as to show one side in profile. Construct the plan, as shown, to correspond with it and draw the miter lines. Divide the profile A S G into spaces in the usual manner, and from the points thus obtained drop lines across one section, N X O, of the plan. Lay off the stretchout C D at right angles to the side N O of the plan. Place the T-square parallel to the stretchout, and, bringing it successively against the several points in the miter lines N X and O X. cut the corresponding measuring lines. A line traced through the points thus obtained will describe the pattern sought. In this illustration is shown a method sometimes resorted to by pattern cutters to avoid the confusion resulting from dropping all the points across one section of the plan. The points from 18 to 20 inclusive are dropped upon the line O X.

Fig. 300.   The Patterns for an Urn, the Plan of which is a Dodecagon.

Fig. 300. - The Patterns for an Urn, the Plan of which is a Dodecagon.

The stretchout C D is drawn in exactly the middle of the pattern - that is. it is drawn from X. the central point of the plan. Points are transferred by the T-square from O X to the measuring lines on one side of the stretchout, the points on the other side being obtained by duplicating distances from C D on the several lines. The points 1 to 13 are dropped on N X only. The stretchout E F is laid off at right angles to the side M N from the point X, and, the T-square being set parallel to E F, the points are transferred to the measuring lines on one side of E F, while the distances on the opposite side are set off by measurement, as described in the first instance, This plan will be found advantageous in complicated and very extended profiles.

PROBLEM 24. The Pattern for a Drop Upon the Face of a Bracket.

In Figs. 301 and 302, methods of obtaining the return strip fitting around a drop and mitering against the face of a bracket are shown. Similar letters in the two figures represent similar parts, and the following demonstration may be considered as applying to both. Let A B DC be the elevation of a part of the face of the bracket, and H K L a portion of the side, showing the connection between the side strip of the drop E K G and the face of the bracket. To state the case simply, F G is the profile and N M the miter line, because N M is the outline of the surface against which the side strip miters. Then, following the rule, divide F G into any convenient number of parts in the usual manner, as shown by the small figures. Produce H K. as shown by O P. and on O P lay off a stretchout, through the points in which draw the usual measuring lines. From the points in the profile F G carry lines in the direction of the molding - that is, parallel to K M - intersecting the face of the bracket N M. Reverse the T-square, placing the blade parallel to the stretchout line O P, and, bringing it successively against the points in N M, cut the corresponding measuring lines, as indicated by the dotted lines. Then a line traced through these several points of intersection, as shown by O R P, will be the pattern of the strip fitting around E F G and mitering against the irregular surface N M of the bracket face.

Problem 23 The Patterns For An Urn The Plan Of Whi 304

Fig. 301.

Problem 23 The Patterns For An Urn The Plan Of Whi 305

Fig. 302.

The Pattern for a Drop upon the Face of a Bracket.