This is one of the many instances which calls for special draftsmanship on the part of the pattern cutter. Frequently the architect's drawings give only a detail of a bracket for the level cornice of a building, while the scale elevations show one or more of the gables to he finished with raking brackets. In such cases the detail of the "level" bracket and the pitch of the roof are the only available facts from which to produce the required bracket.

In Fig. 382, let M X or O P be drawn at the re-quired angle, with reference to any horizontal line, to represent the pitch of the gable cornice. The first step is to redraw the normal side elevation of the level bracket so that its vertical lines shall be at right, angles to the lines of the rake, all as shown at L Q P. Next, at any convenient distance from this draw two vertical lines, as M O and N1 P1, the horizontal distance between which shall be the required face width of the bracket. Lines projected parallel to the rake from the various angles in the profile between these vertical lines will complete the front elevation of the raking bracket. The additional lines E G and F H representing the sink in the face, A C showing the depth of the panel in side. and U D giving the depth of the sink in the face, will he understood from the drawing.

To construct a side view of the raking bracket, or, what is the same thing, the pattern for the side (including the bottom of the sunken panel and the sink strips U D Z in the face), all hights must be measured upon one of the vertical lines of the face view, as M 0. To avoid confusion, however, and make room for other patterns, another vertical line. X1P2 will serve as well. Divide the curved portions U to P of the face of the normal profile into any convenient number of small spaces for use in this and subsequent parts of the operation. From all the points in the profile of face carry lines parallel to the rake through the side view and continue them till they intersect the vertical line X1 P2. From the points thus obtained in the line X1 P2 carry lines indefinitely horizontally, as indicated. Upon each of the lines so drawn lay off from the line X1 P2 a distance or distances equal to the distance or distances upon the corresponding lines drawn across the normal side of the bracket. Through the points thus obtained trace lines, which will give the several shapes in the sides of the brackets corresponding to the shapes shown in the side of the normal bracket. It may be necessary to introduce in the several profiles of the normal bracket other points than those derived from spacing the profile. Use as many such points as may be necessary to determine the position of all points in the side being constructed. Then X1 N2 P2 will be the pattern of the side of the bracket, and U2 Z2 D2 will be the pattern of the strip forming the sides of the sink shown in the face by E F H G, and b1 a1 d1 c1 will be the shape of the panel in the side of the bracket.

For the patterns of the several pieces forming the face of the bracket the profiles are to be found in the normal side view, from which stretchouts can be obtained when wanted, and laid out at right angles to the lines of the rake; while the miter lines of any part are the vertical lines of the face view corresponding to that part of the profile under consideration.

For the strip REGS, forming that part of the face at the side of the sink, lay off a stretchout of its profile U Z at right angles to the lines of the rake, as shown by u2 z1 through the points in which the usual measuring lines are drawn. Drop the points from the profile to the miter lines R S and E G; then, with the T-square placed at right angles to the lines of the rake, and brought successively against the points in R S and E G, the corresponding measuring lines are cut. Then lines traced through these points of intersection, as , shown by R1 S1 and E1 G3, form the pattern for that piece.

For the piece forming the face of the bracket below the sink, as shown in the elevation by SOP1 Z1, proceed in like manner. A stretchout of its profile, as indicated by D P, is laid off at right angles to the lines of the rake, through which the usual measuring lines are drawn. The points in D P are then carried parallel to the rake, cutting the miter lines S O and Z1 P1. The T-square is then placed at right angles to the lines of the rake, and brought against the several points in the sides S O and Z1 P1, by which the corresponding measuring lines are cut. In like manner it is brought against the points G and H, by which the shape of the part extending up to meet the sink is determined. Then lines traced through these several points of intersection, as shown by H3 Z3 P3O1 S2 G2 form the pattern for that part of the face of the bracket. The upper part of the face of the bracket, shown in the face view by N1 U1 R M, being a Bat surface, as indicated in the side view N U, is obtained by pricking directly from the face view of. the bracket, no development of it being necessary.

To avoid confusion of lines, the sink piece E FH

Fig. 382.   The Patterns for a Raking Bracket.

Fig. 382. - The Patterns for a Raking Bracket.

Fig. 883.   Upper Return of Bracket Head.

Fig. 883. - Upper Return of Bracket Head.

Fig. 384.   Loner Return of Bracket Head.

Fig. 384. - Loner Return of Bracket Head.

G is transferred to the right, as shown by E1 F1 H 1 G1. The profile of it, as indicated in the side view by UD, is divided into any convenient number of spaces, and through the points lines are drawn, cutting the miter lines E1 G1 and F1H1. The stretchout of this profile, as shown by u1 d2 is laid off at right angles to the lines of the rake, and through the points in it the usual measuring lines are drawn. The square is then placed at right angles to the lines of the rake. and. being brought successively against the points in the sides

E1 G1 and F1 H1, the corresponding measuring lines are cut. Then lines traced through these points of intersection, as shown by E2 G2 F12 H2. constitute the pattern of the bottom of the sink.

Of the strips bounding the panel of the side in the bracket, the piece corresponding to b c in the side view, being vertical, is obtained by pricking directly from its elevation in the face view of the bracket, A B D1 C being the shape. For the other straight strip bounding this panel, shown in the side view by a b, the length is laid off equal to a b, while the width is taken from the face view, equal to the space indicated by A B. For the strip representing the irregular part a to c proceed as follows: Divide the profile a d c into any convenient number of parts, from the points in which carry lines crossing the face view of the same part, as indicated by A B D1 C. At right angles to the lines of the rake lay off a stretchout of the profile just named, as indicated by a2 c2, through the points in which draw the usual measuring lines. Place the T -square at right angles to the lines of rake, and, bringing it against the several points in the line A C and B D1, cut the corresponding measuring lines drawn through the stretchout. Then lines traced through the several points of intersection thus formed, as indi-cated by A1 C2 and B1 D2, will be the pattern of the curved strip forming part of the boundary of the panel in the side view of the bracket.

Of the three pieces of molding forming the head of the bracket, the profile of the piece across the face is normal, as shown at L N, while that of the two side pieces, or returns, requires to be modified or raked before a square miter with the face piece can be effected. These principles will be further explained in Problems 91 to 94. The first step will be to draw a correct elevation of the head, which includes raking the profiles of the upper and lower returns.

Divide the normal profile L N into convenient spaces, and from the points thus obtained carry lines indefinitely parallel to the rake across the top of the face view of the bracket. Draw duplicates of the normal profile, placing them in a vertical position directly above where the new sides are required to be, as shown by n l and k m. Divide these two profiles into the same number of parts employed in dividing the normal profile, and from these points drop lines vertically, intersecting those drawn from L N. Then lines traced through these points of intersection, as shown by L1 N1 and K M, will be respectively the profiles of the moldings on the upper side and on the lower side of the bracket. Lay off a stretchout of the profile L N at right angles to the line of the rake and through the points in it draw the usual measuring lines. "With the blade of the T-square at right angles to the lines of the rake, and brought successively against the several points in the profile N1 L1 and K M, cut the measuring lines drawn through the stretchout. Then lines traced through the points of intersection thus obtained, as shown by L3 N3 and K1 M1, will be the shape of the ends of the molding forming the front of the bracket head.

Before laying out the pattern for the return molding forming the upper side of the bracket head a correct side elevation of it must be drawn. A duplicate of the profile L1 N1 is transferred to any convenient place, as shown at L3 N4 in Fig. 383, and parallel lines from its angles are extended to the right, as shown, making L1 Q1 equal to L Q of the side view of the bracket.

At Q1 repeat the outline L3 N4, which represents the intersection of the bracket head with the bed mold of the cornice. L1 N1 of Fig. 382 is then the correct profile and the lines L1 N4 and Q1 X2 are the miter lines of this return; however, as both the miter lines are identical with the profile, the stretchout q x may be taken from either one, the other being divided into the same number of spaces as the first, which is easier than dropping the points from one to the other. The T-square may then be placed at right angles to the lines in the molding and brought successively against the points in the lines L3 N4 and Q1 X1, and the corresponding measuring lines intersected. Then lines traced through these points, as shown by L4 N5 and Q3 X3, will form the pattern.

The pattern for the return molding of the head occurring on the lower side of the bracket is obtained in the same manner. A duplicate of the profile K M of the face view of the bracket is drawn at any convenient place, as shown by K2 M3 in Fig. 384. The proper length is given to the molding by measuring upon the side view of the bracket, and a duplicate of the profile is drawn at the opposite end. Space the profile K2 M3 into any convenient number of parts, as indicated by the small figures, and in like manner divide the profile K3 M3 into the same number of parts. At right angles to the line of the molding lay off a stretchout of these profiles, as shown by k1 ml, through which draw the usual measuring lines. With the blade of the T-square at right angles to the lines of the molding, and brought successively against the several points in the profiles K2 M3 and K3 M3, cut the corresponding measuring lines. Then a line traced through these points of intersection, as shown by K5 M5 and K4 M4, will constitute the pattern of the return molding, or the lower side of the bracket.