In the solution of the problem stated above, and which is given in Fig. 385, the first requisite is the design or outline of the side of the normal bracket, as such an outline is really a section through the raking bracket upon a line at right angles to the rake. NST shows the side view of a normal bracket, or the bracket as it would appear in a level cornice, the part from G to H being molded as shown by the shaded profile, which profile, being a section on line a b of the normal bracket, is given complete at J and called the normal profile. The first step is to derive from these factors a front elevation of the molded panel upon the face of the raking bracket. To accomplish this first divide the profile of the panel molding into any convenient number of equal parts, as shown in the section shaded in the side of the normal bracket, and through these points draw lines parallel to the face of the bracket, producing them until they cut the upper surface against which the panel terminates, and in the opposite direction until they meet the vertical surface in the lower part of the bracket against which the panel terminates at the bottom. From the points thus obtained in the horizontal surface near the top of the bracket and in the vertical surface near the bottom of the bracket draw lines at right angles to the face, thus transferring the points to the line representing the outer face of the panel, as shown from G to H.

These points will be used a little later in developing the view of the panel at right angles to the face. Next, from the points already obtained in the line representing the vertical surface near the bottom of the bracket carry lines parallel with the rake, extending them across the front elevation of the bracket. In the diagram, to avoid confusion, these lines terminate at the intersections shown from A to B, but in actual work they would be extended across the front elevation, thereby making also the intersections shown from C to D. At any convenient place in line with the front elevation of the raking bracket draw the normal profile, as shown below the elevation, and divide it into spaces corresponding to the spaces used in dividing the profile in the side view. From the points thus obtained carry lines vertically, intersecting those just drawn from the side of the normal bracket across the front elevation. A line traced through the points of intersection gives the outlines shown at A B and C D. These outlines constitute a front, elevation of the lower end of the molded panel, or the view as seen from a point exactly in front of the face of the raking bracket when finished and in its proper or final position. The outline or shape of the Upper end of the panel would appear as a simple straight line in this view because it miters against a surface which is horizontal from front to back. A B C D F E shows the entire front view of the molded panel. This view furnishes the means for the next step, which is to obtain a. view at right angles to the face G H, and at the same at right angles to the lines of the rake N O. To do this, first continue the lines from the normal profile of panel in their vertical course till they intersect the upper line of the panel E F. These lines are omitted through the face of the bracket, the points only being indicated on the line B F. From the points thus established in E F. and from the points derived in the outlines A B and C D, carry lines at right angles to the raking cornice, producing them indefinitely, as shown. At right angles to the raking cornice, at any convenient place, draw the line H1 and G1, setting off on it spaces corresponding to those established in H G, already described. Through the points in H1 G1 draw lines at right angles to it to the left, producing them until they intersect lines already drawn from the outlines A B and C D and the points in the line E F. Through the points of intersection thus obtained, as indicated by 1 7 in the lower left hand corner, 8 14 in the lower right hand corner. 8, 9, 10, etc., in the upper right hand comer, and 1, 2, 3, 4, etc., in the upper left hand corner, trace lines, thus completing a view of the panel piece at right angles to its face. The next step to be taken is to develop a true profile of this panel, or in other words, a section at right angles to its lines, from which to obtain a stretchout for the required pattern. To do this, first assume any line, as P O, at right angles to the lines of the view just obtained as the surface of the panel in the new profile. Upon this line extended, as at K, draw a duplicate of normal profile so that the points 7 and 8 shall lie in it. Divide the profile K into the same number of spaces as in previous instances, and from these points carry lines through the face view intersecting them with lines of corresponding number, as shown at L P and Q R. Then LPQR will be the true profile of the moldings along the face of the raking bracket. The student will observe that only half the profile is shown at K, as both halves are alike, one-half will answer all purposes if it be kept in mind while making the intersections by number that the points 1-7 in one profile are 14 - 8 in the other. At any convenient place lay off the stretchout of the true profile, as shown to the left by the line L M. Through the points in this line draw the usual measuring lines, as shown. Then, with the blade of the T-square placed parallel with the stretchout line and brought against the several points of intersection at the corners of the "View at Right Angles to the Face," cut corresponding measuring lines. Lines traced through the points thus obtained will produce the pattern shape, as shown.

Fig. 385.   The Pattern for a Raised Panel on the Face of a Raking Bracket.

Fig. 385. - The Pattern for a Raised Panel on the Face of a Raking Bracket.