Octagonal at the Top. • at the Bottom.

Fig. 418.   The Patterns for the Miter at the Bottom of a Hip Molding on a Mansard Roof Which is Octagon at the Top and Square

Fig. 418. - The Patterns for the Miter at the Bottom of a Hip Molding on a Mansard Roof Which is Octagon at the Top and Square

Fig. 419.   Section and Elevation of the Miter at the Bottom of a Hip Molding on a Mansard Roof Which is Octagon at the Top and Square at the Bottom.

Fig. 419. - Section and Elevation of the Miter at the Bottom of a Hip Molding on a Mansard Roof Which is Octagon at the Top and Square at the Bottom.

Fig. 420.   Miter between the Inner Edges of the Hip Moldings at the Bottom.

Fig. 420. - Miter between the Inner Edges of the Hip Moldings at the Bottom.

Space the profile L M' into the same parts as used in laying off the stretchout W V, and through the points draw lines parallel to D4 C3, cutting the line S2 A4, which, being the center line of the octagonal side of the roof, is also the miter line between the two arms of the hip molding. From the points of intersection in the line D4 A4, at right angles to S3 Y1, draw lines cutting S2 Y1, giving the points marked 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14. For convenience in using one stretchout for the entire pattern, transfer these points to the line S Y of the true face in Fig. 418, from which, at right angles to S Y, draw lines cutting the corresponding measuring lines of the stretchout. Then a line traced through these points of intersection, as shown from S1 to X, will complete the pattern.

PROBLEM no.

Patterns for the Fascias of a Hip Molding Finishing a Curved Mansard Roof which is Square at the

Base and Octagonal at the Top.

The conditions involved in this problem do not differ greatly from those given in Problems 80, 81 and 82, near which it should properly be classed. In this case, however, the profile of an entire roof is under consideration instead of that of a simple molding or vase, but the problem is here introduced as being closely related in feature to several of the foregoing problems.

C D E F of Fig. 421 represents the plan of the roof at its base, while V G H W represents the plan at the top. It will be seen that the roof is nearly square at the foot of the rafters and octagonal at the top. The same conditions may arise where the corners of the roof are chamfered, starting at nothing at the bottom and increasing to a considerable space at the top, without reference to forming an octagon. D G H E in the plan represents a chamfer or transition piece in the construction of a roof which, as above described, is square at the base and octagonal at the top. This part is represented in elevation by D2 G2 H2 E2 The elevation is introduced here not for any use in pattern cutting, but simply to show the relation of parts. In the sectional view of the roof O A B the outer line O B represents the surface of the fascias of which the patterns are required, the inner curve showing the line of the roof boards and the depth of the sink strips. As it is in the plan that the miter lines are shown it will be necessary to develop the pattern from the plan. Assuming then that one of the square sides, as E F W H, is to be done first, it will be necessary to place a profile so that its projection O A shall lie across this part of the roof, all as shown by O1 A1 B1.

Divide the profile O1 B1 into any convenient number of equal spaces, and from the points of division drop lines parallel to E F, the side of the roof, cutting the miter line E H. Upon any line at right angles to this side of the roof, as O2 B4, lay off a stretchout through the points, in which draw the usual measuring lines. Cut these measuring lines bylines drawn vertically from the points in E H. Then a line traced through these points of intersection, as shown by E3 H3, will be the line of the pattern corresponding to the line E H in the plan. The width of the flange or fascia forming the hip finish may be obtained as described in Problem 6. and the corner piece drawn in to agree with the original design, as shown by S1 T1

If it is desirable to produce an elevation of this angle of the roof it can be done by dividing the profile O B by the same points as were used in dividing O1 B1, from which horizontal lines can be drawn to the left intersecting with the lines of corresponding number previously erected from the miter line E H. A line, E2 H2, drawn through the points of intersection will with D2 G2 give the correct elevation of the transition side.

For the pattern of this side it will be necessary to first construct a section upon its center line. P R of the plan. At any convenient place outside of the plan draw a duplicate of P R parallel to it, as shown by P1 A1, and from the point A1 erect a perpendicular, A1 B1, in length equal to A B of the original section. In A1 B1 set off points corresponding to the points in A B, and through them draw horizontal lines, as shown. Place the T-square parallel to A1 B1, and, bringing it against the points in E H previously obtained from the profile O1 B1, cut corresponding measuring lines. Then a line traced through these points of intersection, as shown by B1 P1, will complete the diagonal section corresponding to P R in the plan. From this diagonal section take a stretchout, which lay off on the straight line corresponding to P R produced, all as shown by P3 B3. Through the points in P2 B3 draw the usual measuring lines. With the T-square placed parallel to this stretchout line, and brought successively against the points in E H, cut the measuring lines, as shown. Then a line traced through these points of intersection, as shown by E1 to H1, will be one side of the required pattern. In like manner, having transferred points from E H across to the corresponding line D G, cut the measuring lines from it, which will give the other side of the required pattern. The width of fascias (whose intersection forms a panel in this case) may be obtained as suggested above and as given in Problem 6.

In locating the points N1 and M1 of this pattern it

Pattern Problems,

Fig. 421. Patterns for the Fascias of a Hip Molding Finishing a Curved Mansard Roof Which is Square at the Eaves and

Fig. 421.-Patterns for the Fascias of a Hip Molding Finishing a Curved Mansard Roof Which is Square at the Eaves and is desirable for the sake of design that they be, when finished and in position, at the same vertical distance below the cornice as are the points S and T on the square sides of the roof. To accomplish this it will be necessary to go back to the points S1 and T1, in the first pattern obtained, and from them carry lines back into the stretchout line O2 B4, where they are numbered 10 1/2, and 11 1/2. Their positions may now be transferred by means of the dividers to the normal profile O B, where their vertical hights can be measured on the line A B, as shown, and transferred again to the verticil line A1 B1 of the diagonal section. It is only necessary now to carry them across, as shown, to the profile P1 B1, where their distances from adjacent points may be measured by the dividers and placed upon the stretchout line P2 B2. By similar means the appearance of this panel both in the plan and in the elevation may be completed if so desired, all of which will be made clear by inspection of the drawing.

In the case of very large roofs, where the development of a profile or a pattern to the full size would be impracticable, it is possible to perform the work to a scale of 1 1/2 or 3 inches to the foot; after which full size patterns of parts of convenient size may be obtained by multiplying their various dimensions by 8 or 4.

As the patterns for the roll, usually finishing the hip, are properly included under the head of Flaring Work, which subject is treated in the following section of this chapter, they will not be given here. The radii from which they can be obtained, however, may be derived from the diagonal section in the manner described in the following problem.