By K. V. REED

FLAT dwellers have no space at their disposal for a person to work at photography, and the bathroom must take the place of a dark room. As this was very inconvenient in my case, I constructed a table, that from all appearances was nothing more than a large-size kitchen worktable, and such a table can be used in case the builder does not care to construct it. The table is turned upside down and the top removed by taking out the screws. The top is made of several pieces glued together and will remain in one piece. It is then hinged at one side to the top edge of the rail, so that it can be turned back like a trunk, or box, cover.

An Ordinary Kitchen Worktable Fitted Up as a Handy Workshop for the Amateur Photographer Who Has a Limited Space in a Flat, and Where a Table can be Used to Advantage in a Room

Ill: An Ordinary Kitchen Worktable Fitted Up as a Handy Workshop for the Amateur Photographer Who Has a Limited Space in a Flat, and Where a Table can be Used to Advantage in a Room

Boards are then nailed to the under edge of the rails. If a very neat job is required, these boards should be set inside on strips nailed to the inside surfaces of the rails, at the proper place to make the boards come flush with the under edges of the rails.

At the back side and in the center of the new bottom, a hole is cut, 6 or 7 in. square, and a box fastened beneath it, to form a bottom several inches below the main bottom. In this space bottles filled with solutions are kept. The main bottom should be painted with an acid-proof varnish.

The space in the table is then divided, and partitions set up, which can be arranged to suit the builder.

Another attachment, which comes in exceedingly handy, is the ruby light.

This consists of a box, large enough to receive a printing frame at the bottom. Two holes are cut in the table top, at the right places to make a window for the light and a slit for the printing frame. When the table top is raised, the box with the light is fastened over the openings with hooks, the arrangement of which will depend on the size and shape of the box. In closing, the lamp box is removed, and pieces of board are set in the holes. This can be easily arranged, if the holes and blocks are cut on a slight slope, so that the latter when set in will not fall through the openings.