Pure water, free from all foreign sub-stances, is frequently wanted for making up photographic solutions and many other purposes. An apparatus for distilling water can be very easily made from galvanized pipe fittings. The outer cooling jacket A is a piece of 1-in. pipe, 2 ft. long, threaded on both ends, and bored and tapped for 1/2 -in. pipe at B and C. A hole is bored and tapped for 1/2 -in. pipe in each of the two caps used on the ends of the pipe A, and a piece of 1/2-in. pipe, D, 2 ft. 8 in. long, is run through the holes as shown. The joints are soldered to make them water-tight. Two 1/2 -in. nipples, 4 in. long, are screwed in at B and C. The retort, or boiler, E, in which the impure water is boiled may be made of any suitable vessel and heated with a Bunsen or gas burner. A beaker, or other vessel, F, is placed below the lower end of the small pipe. The cold water from the faucet, which flows into the outer jacket at C and out at B, condenses the steam in the small pipe D, turning it into water which falls into the beaker in large drops. The water is often distilled a second time to remove any impurities which it might still contain. - Contributed by O. E. Tronnes, Evanston, Ill.

Homemade Still for Removing the Impurities in Water That is Used in Mixing Chemicals

Ill: Homemade Still for Removing the Impurities in Water That is Used in Mixing Chemicals