The amateur craftsman, at some time or other, needs a hot flame for certain kinds of work, and a Bunsen or alcohol flame is brought into service. The gasoline and alcohol flames have their drawbacks, one of which is the starting of the burner and the waiting for the heat. They are also unhandy in directing the flame on parts of the work. As I desired a burner for quick work and one whose flame I could direct at any angle, for repousse and chasing on copper and silversmith's work, I made the one shown in the sketch to attach to a hose and connected it with the gas pipe of the illuminating system in the house. It consists of a hose connection into which a piece of pipe, 5 in. long, is fitted. The hose connection is also fitted with a small nozzle, A, for the gas, and the pipe has an opening through it at the end of the nozzle. - Contributed by John Koestner, Brooklyn, N. Y.

Bunsen Burner Attachment for Use with Illuminating Gas Taken from the House Mains

Ill: Bunsen-Burner Attachment for Use with Illuminating Gas Taken from the House Mains