Procure a piece of thin tin-the metal taken from a discarded fruit can will do - and cut it about 21/2 in. long and wide enough to encircle the break. Notch the ends like saw teeth and remove any sharp edges with a file. Place the tin on the break and tie temporarily. Wind the whole from end to end with a waxed linen thread, such as used by harness makers. The threads lying alternately on the whip and on metal at the notched ends eliminate any possibility of the parts working loose. A break near the small and flexible end of a whip is repaired in the same manner, using a quill instead of the tin. In either case, do not Let the edges of the splicing material meet, and it will clamp tightly on the whip. - Contributed by W. S. Kingsley, W. Gouldsboro, Me.

The Repair on a Whip Made with a Notched Ferrule and a Waxed Thread

Ill: The Repair on a Whip Made with a Notched Ferrule and a Waxed Thread