Secure ten gas jet valves, the part of the gas fixture shown in Fig. 1, and prepare to place in a piece of 1-in. pipe, 12 in. long. This is done by drilling and tapping 10 holes, each

Details of the Calliope

Details of the Calliope

1 in. apart, in a straight line along the pipe. The valves screwed into these holes appear as shown in Fig. 2. The whistles are made from pipe of a diameter that will fit the valves. No dimensions can be given for the exact lengths of these pipes as they must be tried out to get the tone. Cut ten pieces of this pipe, each one of a different length, similar to the pipes on a pipe organ. Cut a thread on both ends, put a cap on the end intended for the top, and fit a plug in the other end. The plug must have a small portion of its side filed out, and a notch cut in the side of the pipe with its horizontal edge level with the top of the plug. This part of each whistle is made similar to making a bark whistle on a green stick of willow. The pipes are then screwed into the valves.

The whistles may be toned by trying out and cutting off pieces of the pipe, or by filling the top end with a little melted lead. The 1-in. pipe must have a cap screwed on one end and the other attached to a steam pipe. The steam may be supplied by using an old range boiler, placed horizontally in a fireplace made of brick or sheet iron. If such a boiler is used, a small safety valve should be attached. The keys and valve operation are shown in Fig. 3. This is so plainly illustrated that it needs no explanation. --Contributed by Herbert Hahn, Chicago.