This interesting as well as entertaining illusion, can be made by anyone having a wood-turning lathe. A solid, similar to two cones placed base to base, is accurately turned in a lathe, the sides sloping to an angle of 45 deg. The spindle can be turned out of the solid at the same time as the cone; or, after turning the cone, drive an iron or wood shaft through the center making a tight fit.

The boards for the track are made with a sloping edge on which the cone is to roll. This slope will depend on the diameter of the cone, which can be any size from 3 to 12 in. The slope should not be too flat, or the cone will not roll, and it should be such that the one end will be higher than the other by a little less than half the diameter of the cone. Thus it will be seen that the diameter of the cone determines the length of the slope of the tracks. A notch should be cut in the tracks, as indicated, for the shaft to drop into at the end of the course. The Illusion

Illustration: The Illusion

The lower end of the tracks are closed until the high edge of the cone rests upon the inside edges of the tracks and the high end spread sufficiently to take the full width of the cone and to allow the shaft to fall into the notches. When the cone and tracks are viewed from the broadside the deception will be more perfect, and will not be discovered until the construction of the model is seen from all sides. Should it be difficult to make the cone from wood, a good substitute can be made from two funnels. --Contributed by I. G. Bayley, Cape May Point, N.J.