THE CLAMOND GAS BURNER.
THE CLAMOND GAS BURNER.

In this burner, which is a French invention, the light is produced by burning ordinary coal gas within a basket of magnesia, which is thereby brought to a high state of incandescence, and from which a white, steady light is radiated. It may be said to consist of three different parts. The first and inner part is a central column, B, of fireproof material. The second part consists of two concentric cylinders placed round the inner column and communicating one with the other through the cross cuts, J. The third part is a china cup inclosing the other parts, and perforated with a number of holes. The gas burns in two different places. From A it passes directly through B, at the top of which it branches off through tubes to an annular chamber, D, from which it escapes through the openings, a, a, a, where combustion takes place. The other combustion occurs within the circular space, G, I, between the column and the inner of the two surrounding cylinders, through two channels, E E, in the lower part of the central column. The gas passes into a circular chamber, F F, and escapes through small holes in the upper partition of this chamber, where it burns. The product of this combustion passes put into K, through the cross cuts, J. The air entering through the holes, H L, of the outer china cup passes along the inner of the two concentric cylinders, which is heated to redness, and rises highly heated toward the upper annular burner, where the gas burns at a, a, a, in small separate flames, each entirely surrounded by the hot air. This insures perfect combustion of the gas within the basket of magnesia placed above, and which is thus brought to a state of incandescence. It will be seen from this description how simple and practical the arrangement is. It is claimed for the light produced that it will stand comparison with the electric light. Like that, it shows colors perfectly true, and will enable an observer to distinguish between the most delicate shades, allowing of the finest work being executed as by daylight. It is, moreover, stated to be perfectly steady. As the Clamond burner can be fixed to any gas bracket or lamp now in use, its adoption causes no other expense than the cost of the burner itself. There is no expensive installation, and when used in combination with the electric light, it is claimed that a uniform lighting will be obtainable instead of the unpleasant contrast between gas and electricity. Another important advantage obtained by the Clamond burner is the saving effected in the consumption of gas as compared with the same power of light obtained from ordinary burners.