The ordinary or current deposit ledger is a very active and important book in a bank, and one which calls for both accuracy and dispatch on the part of the clerk in charge, as errors can easily be made, involving the bank in serious loss. The deposit ledger is invariably a loose-leaf book and ruled as shown in Figure 22. This form is invariably used by all the banks. The so-called Boston ledger has been tried several times, but was not found practicable in Canada, owing perhaps to the method of marking or accepting checks by a direct debit to the account. The accounts are arranged alphabetically, and are therefore self-indexing, but an index is usually kept on the tagged sheet dividing the alphabet.

In small offices there is usually only one current ledger used, A-Z. As work increases and becomes too much for one ledger-keeper, a second ledger can can be opened divided A-K and L-Z. For three ledgers the divisions generally run A-G, H-O, and P-Z, and for four the divisions are A-C, D-K, L-R and S-Z.

As the ledger is loose-leaf there is no accumulation of dead leaves, but the general regulations regarding loose-leaf ledgers given in Section 3 of this chapter should be observed closely.

The posting is invariably made direct from the

BANK

Sheet No.

Account No.

Name

Address

Date

Particulars

Debit

Credit

Dr. or Cr.

Balance

Date

Particulars

Debit

Credit

Dr. or Cr.

Balance

Figure 22. Current Deposit Ledger

Sheet No.

Account No.

Name

Occupation

Address

Signature

Manager

Date

Particulars

Debit

Credit

Initials

Balance

Interest

Days

Debit

Credit

Balance

Figure 23. Savings Deposit Ledger original deposit slips and vouchers, and called back or checked from the supplementary cash book. The balances should be kept constantly extended, and checked from time to time by the additions of the debit and credit columns.