Before making undergarments, a good commercial pattern of the correct size should be bought, and the amount of material that the pattern directs purchased. The directions should be read carefully, and the garment cut accordingly. The garment must be basted and fitted carefully, because patterns are not exactly correct for every type of figure.

Seams Suitable For Undergarments

The following kinds of seams are suitable for undergarments:

1. Plain seam (Figs. 86, 87), the joining of two edges with one row of stitching. The edges may be finished by overcasting them together or separate, by binding them together or separate, or by turning them under and stitching them.

2. French seam (Fig. 88), a seam within a seam. A narrow seam is sewed on the right side of the garment, then turned to the wrong side, and a second stitching made just far enough from the edge to conceal the raw edges of the first seam.

3. Fell or felled seam, a flat, smooth seam. There are various kinds of fells:

A hemmed fell (Fig. 89) may be used in handmade garments. A plain seam is made on the wrong side. One edge is trimmed narrower than the other, and the wider edge is creased over the narrower. The seam is then laid flat and the folded edge hemmed down to the material.

A stitched fell is a tailored seam. A plain seam is sewed on the right side. One edge is trimmed narrower than the other. The seam is laid flat and basted and stitched down to the material.

A flannel fell (Fig. 91) is used in flannel garments. A plain seam is sewed on the wrong side. One edge is trimmed narrower than the other. The seam is laid flat and the raw edge catch-stitched down to the material.

A standing fell is used to sew a gathered edge to a plain edge. The gathered edge is first sewed to the plain edge in a plain seam on the wrong side of the material, the plain edge extending beyond the gathered edge and the line of stitching coming on the line of gathering. A narrow fold is made on the plain edge and folded a second time so that the first folded edge just covers the line of stitching. It is then basted and hemmed or stitched into place.

Fig. 86

Fig. 86. - Plain seam with edges overcast.

Fig. 87

Fig. 87. - Plain seams. Left, pinked edges; right, bound edges.

Fig. 88

Fig. 88. - French seam.

Fig. 89

Fig. 89. - Hemmed fell.

Fig. 90

Fig. 90. - Overhanded or French fell.

Fig. 91

Fig. 91. - Flannel fell.