While veal is in season all the year in many markets, it is best in spring and summer, being at its prime in May. The quality of the veal depends to a considerable extent upon the age and manner of feeding. Six to ten weeks is the preferable age at the time of killing. When the calf is killed under four weeks of age the meat is injurious, so that it is not allowed to be sold, such being known as "bob veal." The flesh of such immature calves is soft, flabby and gelatinous, blue and watery in color instead of fine-grained, tender and white with a tendency to pink, as in the healthy meat. The meat is best of calves which have been fed entirely upon milk. Grass-feeding is the poorest of all.

In France an especially fine quality is secured by careful feeding, raw eggs being included in the feed.

The cuts of veal are similar to those of beef, except simpler. The fore quarter includes only five ribs and is so small that it is easily boned and rolled for a good sized roast. The entire fore quarter weighs 6 to 12 pounds, and costs 8 to 10 cents entire or with neck removed 10 to 14 cents. The neck can be used for stew. The head and brains are esteemed by many, the head being used for soup, and the brains cooked in various ways.

The loin includes all that is divided into loin and rump in the beef. This is an excellent roast, the leg alone being considered better. The leg is the choicest for roasts or for cutlets. The shoulder when boned, rolled and stuffed makes a very acceptable cheap veal roast. The breast is good for stew. The "knuckle" of veal corresponds to the shin in the beef and is especially fine for soup, being highly gelatinous.

Cuts Similar to Beef

Cuts Of Veal According To The U. S. Department Of Agriculture

Cuts Of Veal According To The U. S. Department Of Agriculture

Side Of Veal

Side Of Veal