Popularity of the Toque - Cheapest and Simplest Way of Making Up - How to Drape Velvet-drawing the Velvet into " Ears " - The Toque Complete

Toques can be constructed out of almost any material, from tulle and lace for summer and evening wear to velvet, cloth, and fur, which, when artistically draped, forms a most suitable and cosy headgear for winter.

For tulle, chiffon, lace, and the lighter fabrics wire shapes are invariably used; these can be procured from almost any draper at 8 3/4d. or 10 3/4d. If a particularly new shape is required, the majority of drapers will make to order.

For velvet, cloth, and fur, the spartra, or buckram, shapes are better; these can also be obtained at a price varying from 10 3/4d. to is. 3 1/2d.; the price will range according to size of shape. For the toque described in this article select a very light shape with a "coronet," as illustrated in Figure 1.

The next question is the selection of the material; if velvet is chosen 2 1/4 yards, about 18 to 20 inches wide, will be required. The average price for a fairly good miroir velvet is 3s: 11 1/8d. (Miroir velvet is usually much lighter than ordinary velvet.)

Back

Back

Front

Fig. 1. The shape

Figure i illustrates the shape, with coronet. (A " coronet " is the technical millinery term for the outside brim of the turban toque.)

Back

Back

Front

Fig. 2. The snape turned upside down

Turn shape upside down and mark front, back, and sides of interior of shape with pencil or pins.

Take one end of the velvet and place a corner over the front of the interior of brim (see Fig. 3a); if the interior of shape droops or sinks into the head, as is usual in the present fashion, a pleat will be required in the centre of the back to take out the excessive fulness and insure fit, as seen in Fig. 3b.

Fig. 3a. The velvet placed over interior of brim

Fig. 3a. The velvet placed over interior of brim

Fig. 3b. Shows the pleat in centre of the back

Fig. 3b. Shows the pleat in centre of the back

Fig. 4. Fitting the velvet all round inside of brim

Fig. 4. Fitting the velvet all round inside of brim

Fit all round the inside of the brim, allowing the velvet to sink well into the head and fit down without dragging. Work all fulness to the back, as illustrated, and pin round.

Fig. 5. The superfluous fulness cut away

Fig. 5. The superfluous fulness cut away

Cut out superfluous fulness, and leave just sufficient velvet to lap at back.

Cut away

Fig. 6. The inside head mark pinned all round, showing the velvet

Fig. 6. The inside head mark pinned all round, showing the velvet

Pin all round the head mark of inside, and when this has been neatly fitted and pinned down, cut a circle of velvet 3/4 of an inch from the head mark.

The head mark

Fig. 7a. The 3/4 inch of velvet snipped, and ready for sewing into

Fig. 7a. The 3/4-inch of velvet snipped, and ready for sewing into

Snip the 3/4 of an inch of velvet left from the head mark into small pieces, as illustrated in Figure 7a, and sew into the head, as shown in figure 7b.

Cut the velvet 3/4 of an inch all round, beyond the edge of the inside brim, and sew back on to the outside of coronet.

Fig. 7b. Sew the 3/4 inch of velvet, after snipping to the head mark

Fig. 7b. Sew the 3/4-inch of velvet, after snipping to the head mark

Fig. 8. Cut the velvet 3/4 of an inch beyond edge of brim, and sew back on to outside of coronet

Fig. 8. Cut the velvet 3/4 of an inch beyond edge of brim, and sew back on to outside of coronet

The inside brim is now complete, and the draping of the velvet for the outside can be commenced.

Fig. 9. One selvedge of the velvet sewn to edge of coronet, the wrong side of material being towards the worker

Fig. 9. One selvedge of the velvet sewn to edge of coronet, the wrong side of material being towards the worker

Fig. 10. The velvet draped round the coronet before the ears have been formed ears

Fig. 10. The velvet draped round the coronet before the "ears" have been formed ears

Fig. 11. The velvet in process of being drawn up to form the

Fig. 11. The velvet in process of being drawn up to form the

Fig. 12. The back of toque, as it should appear at this stage of the work

Fig. 12. The back of toque, as it should appear at this stage of the work

Take the remainder of the velvet and place one selvedge on to the coronet, the right side of material inside; this is sewn all round, and the piece over is left loose, to be used for the tie-over.

The material is then turned over, and leaves quite a neat edge.

It is almost impossible to describe how to drape, or where to locate each fold, as this is entirely a question of individual taste and discretion. The mere knowledge of being tied down to copy a sketch or model is disastrous to an imaginative or creative mind. Above all, avoid fingering the velvet or sewing too firmly; the less any fabric is handled, the more chance has it of retaining its freshness and crisp appearance.

The finished sketch illustrates a draped toque, the velvet of which has been drawn together at the sides to form two of the fashionable " donkey ears."

Sketch of finished toque as it should appear when worn

Sketch of finished toque as it should appear when worn

Fig. 10 illustrates the position of the velvet before it has been drawn together to form the "ears."

Fig. ii indicates the velvet being drawn up into " ears."

Fig. 12 illustrates the back view of toque at this stage.

There now remains the piece of velvet to be made into a tie-over or sort of " choux " at the back. This is just caught together at the bottom of the coronet, as seen in

Fig. 13Fig. 14 shows the back of the toque completed.

Although velvet has been chosen as the medium for the toque described, the same directions hold good for the lighter fabrics, such as chiffon, tulle, cloth, etc.

The use of a pretty slide or cabochon greatly adds to the effect in some instances, and the draping of the material can be adapted to the particular style of the moment.

Fig. 13. The piece of velvet at back is caught together to form a tie over or choux draped velvet

Fig. 13. The piece of velvet at back is caught together to form a tie-over or choux draped velvet

Fig. 14. Back view of finished toque, showing effect of the

Fig. 14. Back view of finished toque, showing effect of the