If Scientifically Treated, Embroidery can be Mended in a Way Which Baffles Detection - The

Necessary Outfit Required - Exact Instructions

When taken as a fine handicraft, mend-ing requires quite as much skill as the more obvious and attractive occupation of making, and though this fact is not always readily recognised, it is well worth consideration. Repairing can be brought to such a high standard of perfection that it will actually make good the damage done. Then not only will the mend be scarcely distinguishable, but it will often outlive the wear of the article in which it is introduced.

Fig. I. A jagged tear in a piece of embroidery edging, such as here shown, can be mended so that the damage is invisible

Fig. I. A jagged tear in a piece of embroidery edging, such as here shown, can be mended so that the damage is invisible

Of course, there 3 such a thing is an unwise put-ting of "new cloth into old gar-ments," which should be avoided and which would only be waste of time. Unfortunately that which is already nearly worn out rarely suffers from accidents. A rash movement or a false step on the stairs will result in the breaking of a Sevres china vase, or a rent in a dainty muslin frock. The common everyday articles have a way of escaping clanger and remaining unharmed. However, it is surprising what, with patience and time, skilful fingers can do, even in the case of a bad destruction of material, which, if not properly treated, would ruin the value of the object in question.

It may be supposed, by way of example, that a bad tear has been made in a piece of embroidery edging. Instead of any attempt to darn up a hole, the most effective method of proceeding is to put in a fresh piece of material, which will entirely do away with the damaged section. On this may be copied the exact pattern of the embroidery. This mode of mending well repays the extra time it involves, for the embroidery to ali appearances will be as good as new again, and it will wear just as long as the material which was unharmed. (See Fig. I.)

The first point of which it is necessary to take note is whether the embroidery is done on linen, cotton, or muslin, and also its exact texture and consistency. This must be matched as closely as possible in the piece with which it is intended to patch. Then some cotton, thread, or silk, as the case may be, should be secured for carrying out the pattern so that it will correspond exactly with that which is shown on the original embroidery. Besides these materials, will be required a reel of 100 cotton and a very fine needle; an ordinary needle will be wanted for tacking, and a crewel needle for the embroidery cotton.

If the em-broidery has been stretched or the pattern displaced by the tear, it should be carefully pressed with a warm iron before any attempt is made at mending. Then a square of material which is to form the patch should be tacked in place well on the outside of the area of the tear, and so that - in a case like this, where a point of embroidery has to be made up - it will come about a quarter of an inch below the edge. (See Fig. 2.) A thread may be drawn, and to this the points may be fastened, so that the patch will be kept in position and perfectly 3traight. It is important to see that the material is just sufficiently stretched from one side to the other, and neither drawn tight nor puckered. It should be slightly damped and pressed with an iron at this stage.

Fig 2. Place a square of material that matches the torn fabric underneath and well outsite the damaged area. Tack in position by an inner and outer line of tacking. Do not draw or pucker the work.

Fig 2. Place a square of material that matches the torn fabric underneath and well outsite the damaged area. Tack in position by an inner and outer line of tacking. Do not draw or pucker the work.

As far as possible it should be planned finally to join the edges of the patch under the embroidery work. For this reason it is easier to conceal a mend in an elaborate embroidery than in one which is sparsely decorated. An inner thread should be run around the tear at the farthest point to which the patch will extend. Then in the front of the embroidery all the damaged portion can be cut away, taking the scissors close to the tacking line, and right through the centre of the embroidery stitches, otherwise when the new ones are worked over they will be too thickly padded. It is a good plan to tack with black thread, since then there will be no possibility of making a mistake.

The patch must now be sewn finally in position. This should be done on the wrong side with the 100 cotton, and in the finest buttonhole stitch. The needle should be caught each time just on to the reverse side of the pattern. In such places where the patch cannot be joined under cover of the embroidery a thread must be run in and out in a tiny darn, so as to join the edges and keep them from fraying. A tracing should be made from the embroidery pattern, and inserted in exactly the right position on the patch, so that it may join properly to the other part of the design. With the aid of a piece of carbon paper the pattern can be transferred. Then it must be worked out so that in thread and stitch it will exactly copy the original pattern. (See Fig. 3.)

Much depends on skill and careful attention at this point, and before commencing a study should be made of the exact kind of embroidery, of the various stitches used, and of whether any of the principal points of the design require padding beforehand. The raw edges of the patch which are left beyond the buttonhole stitching must also be cut away before the embroidering is done, and the stitches should be taken right through on to the wrong side so that the\ may cover the joining entirely. As soon a all is completed, the remaining piece of the patch below the points should be cut out and the embroidery pressed.

Fig. 3. Trace the pattern of the embroidery, by means of carbon paper, on the new material, ready for embroidering in silk or cotton, as may be required.

Fig. 3. Trace the pattern of the embroidery, by means of carbon paper, on the new material, ready for embroidering in silk or cotton, as may be required.

When the piece has been washed and ironed it will be difficult for the keenest eyes to discsrn what has been done, and the work will give lasting satisfaction to the mender. (See Fig. 4.)

Should the fabric of the embroidery be very rotten, with perhaps no definite rend, but only thin places and small holes to be repaired, the following may be adapted. Of course, it will not give the excellent results of the more elaborate work, but it will answer very well if the article is too old to take a patch, especially if the embroidery is of an openwork design. A piece of material should be tacked under the weak spot, and holes cut out to the corresponding openings in the embroidery. They should be neatly sown on the wrong side, the stitches being hidden in the edge of the embroidery unless the buttonhole-stitch requires remaking. The thin places can be carefully darned with fine thread to the under patch. Mending of this kind will answer quite well for the bottom of a dress where a patch is not very obvious.

involved

Fig. 4. It is impossible to detect the repair when the embroidery is completed, and the result is well worth the time and trouble

Fig. 4. It is impossible to detect the repair when the embroidery is completed, and the result is well worth the time and trouble