The only daughter of Mr. William Kissam Van-elerbilt, one of America's multi-millionaires, Miss Consuelo Vanderbilt married the Duke of Marlborough in 1895. The wedding took place on November 6 of that year at the fashionable church of St. Thomas in Fifth Avenue, New York, amid scenes of unparalleled magnificence. Mr. Vanderbilt's gift to his daughter was a cheque for one million sterling, and amongst the bride's jewels were the famous Vanderbilt pearls, which once belonged to the Empress Catherine of Russia. In London the young Duchess's appearance was a triumph. King Edward and Queen Alexandra showed her marked attention, and when little Lord Blandford, the Duchess's first child, was born in 1897 his late Majesty stood sponsor in person. The Duchess has one other son, Lord Ivor Charles Spencer Churchill, born in 1898. Her Grace, who is a model mother, is one of those women who combine goodness and wealth. At Woodstock, in Oxfordshire, where the famous Blenheim Palace is situated, she has proved a veritable fairy godmother, for she is always devising monster treats for the children of the neighbourhood. She is a woman who has no sympathy with those who live in the idle lap of luxury. "I am a great believer," she once said, "in work, and I wish that everybody, rich as well as poor, were obliged to work a certain number of hours every day." The Duchess is fond of quaint pets, and at Blenheim are to be seen such creatures as gazelles, vultures, snakes, and chimpanzees. Indeed her Grace possesses one of the best private zoos in the kingdom. A par-ticularly strong friendship, by the way, exists between Queen Alexandra and the Duchess of Marlborough. Many are the favours which her Majesty has bestowed upon the Duchess, who, apart from attract wi-the Queen by her philanthropic work, has often proved herself a charming companion by reason of her brilliant conversational powers.

The Duchess of Marlborough Lallie Charles

The Duchess of Marlborough Lallie Charles