Diploma of Honour at the Paris Exhibition. Coiffeur by Appointment to H.m. the Queen.

A Favourite Style - How to Avoid a Hard Effect - Value of the Pompadour in Change with Other Styles - Waving the Hair for the Pompadour Style - Back Dressings - An Easy Style for the Business

Girl

The Pompadour style of dressing the hair depends entirely for its success on the skill shown by the wearer in adapting the

"Pompadour" roll to her own type of beauty.

Let me warn my readers that the tendency of a Pompadour is towards hardness unless certain things are done to ensure a soft effect. Therefore, before giving directions for the making of a Pompadour coiffure, I should like to say a few words of warning.

The Pompadour style is one of the quickest methods of dressing the hair. A Pompadour front and sides, with a chic raised back, finished by an artistic "8" - such as I propose to describe in detail - can be made and finished in under ten minutes. Indeed, it could be done in five, but when attempting this style a few extra minutes must be spent on the manipulation of the Pompadour, if the ultimate result is to be at all pleasing.

Having made a perfectly neat, rather stiff roll of the front hair - receding from the forehead - the fingers must be inserted boldly in the hair, one hand pulling it down, while the other lifts it up. This gives a soft, broken effect, most desirable in this style, which otherwise leaves the hair in a very unbecoming hard line across the forehead.

Very few faces can stand a straight, untouched Pompadour. But many ladies use this style of dressing because it is quick and easy to make, quite forgetting to put those finishing touches which make all the difference between a charming and an un-pleasing result. Remember, in pulling the Pompadour roll into a becoming series of

"puffs," that one hand pulls down while the other lifts up, for this gives a very graceful line to the hair, and helps it to fall naturally.

The Pompadour can be slightly "broken" all across the front, or it can be pulled right down towards one eyebrow, and lifted rather high, off the forehead, on the other side. This leaves a V-shaped piece of forehead exposed; and for ladies with low, pretty foreheads there is no style more charming Needless to say, for high foreheads this style is not becoming, and if used with a high forehead - for which it is not very advisable - the Pompadour must be made very loosely, and pulled well towards the eyebrows, being then lightly divided, to break the hard line.

In addition to these methods of "breaking" the Pompadour, a big central "dip" may be made by drawing the middle of the roll down towards the nose. This style is greatly used by American women, being known in the States as the "Pompadour dip." It certainly suits a certain piquant style of face, and a rather upturned chin, but it should be avoided by the majority of women. It obviously tends to narrow the face and eyes, and, unless the hair is extremely well waved, becomes very heavy.

The Pompadour style is very useful as a change for the woman who prefers to part her hair in the centre or at the side. By dressing her. hair in Pompadour fashion for a few days every now and then, she "rests" her parting, and gives the whole of her hair a change, from which it benefits.

The Pompadour style, by proper adaptation - as described above - can be made to suit ladies who prefer to dress their hair with a parting. For it can be made high or low, soft or hard, in one big puff or several small ones, and the addition of curls or a plait above the roll will give it height and dignity. A light fringe is often used with this type of dressing, as it gives softness, but much the same effect can be achieved with lightly waved hair.

To start a Pompadour dressing, divide the front and side hair from the, foundation, leaving a fringe about two inches deep hanging round the forehead and ears, and. combing the remainder of the hair into the foundation tail, which must be securely tied nearly at the top of the head. Having placed the front and side pieces on pins for waving - full directions for waving on pins were given on page 3839, Vol. 6 - pinch them with hot irons, and remove the pins. About a dozen pins should be used for the front and sides.

A coiffure a la Pompadour, in which the usually severe and hard appearance of this style has been so modified as to produce an effect of softness and delicacy most becoming to all faces

A coiffure a la Pompadour, in which the usually severe and hard appearance of this style has been so modified as to produce an effect of softness and delicacy most becoming to all faces

David Nicol, 50, Haymarket, London, S.w.

In waving the hair on pins for a Pompadour dressing, the wave goes in exactly the same direction as with a side or centre parting, and it will be found that this wave answers quite well. Of course, in marcel waving for a Pompadour style, the wave is taken across the hair instead of from back to front. But it is interesting and instructive to remember that in the days of Madame la Pompadour all waving was done on pins or en papillote, as marcel waving was then unknown. Therefore, the wave made on pins is far nearer the original Pompadour style than the marcel wave.

Having waved the hair, French comb it carefully, then gather the ends in the left hand, and brush the hair lightly upwards and back, holding it firmly a few inches from the ends. Having smoothed it, draw the roll thus made into the desired position, holding the left hand, with the ends, just a little above the "tie" of the foundation tail. The depth of the Pompadour may then be regulated according to taste, by shortening or lengthening the ends held in the left hand. Some ladies like a deep roll, while others prefer it quite shallow. Having fixed the size of the roll, hold it in place with the left hand, while the right quickly fixes it in place with two small combs - pins are useless in fixing a Pompadour roll. The ends may then be twisted round the foundation tail, and secured with pins.

The dressing of the back hair, in conjunction with a Pompadour front, may be plain or elaborate, according to fancy - and time.

I propose to describe two styles, equally suitable for this "front" dressing; one is absolutely simple, and the other rather more elaborate, and also a change from curls. The most simple and speedy method of disposing of the foundation tail is by making a neat figure of "8." This coil of hair rests on the back of the head, the side and back hair being pulled out to form a frame for it, while a pretty back comb inserted below it proves an attractive finish. This style - Pompadour front and figure of "8" - is one which should prove of the greatest use to business girls, as it is chic and pretty, without being in any way over-elaborate.

To make the figure of "8," take the foundation tail in both hands, and twist it round and round firmly until it resembles a lightly twisted rope. It must not look too tight or strained, but just lightly twisted, with a few inches left loose at the bottom. Hold the tail near the end in the left hand, keeping the end in an upward position. Put the thumb of the right hand on the tail, about four inches from the base, and let the tail drop - as it naturally will - towards the neck. This movement forms a loop, and makes the bottom of the "8." Then twist the remainder of the tail as before, and turn it over the beginning of the other coil, making the second loop at the top. Finally, turn the ends under, and the "8" is made. The whole thing is done with two quick movements, and needs three or four pins, properly inserted, to keep it in position. This "8" needs a moderately long tail of hair, and is impossible for the girl with short, thick hair. A "switch" of false hair can easily be used for this purpose, being joined to the foundation tail and firmly tied.

If a rather more elaborate style is desired by the girl with short hair, and also as a variation from curls. I can recommend a waved chignon, with a "torsade coil" tied round it. To make this, tie the foundation tail low down - about an inch from the neck - and fix an oval-shaped pad, with a hole near one end, on the back of the head, by drawing the tail through the hole and pinning the pad securely to the hair. Next put the foundation tail on four or five pins, to wave it, or, if a plain chignon is desired, this waving may be omitted. Having prepared the hair, French comb it on the side nearest the pad, and draw it upwards towards the crown of the head, spreading it over the pad, and tucking the ends under, before pinning it all round.

How the foundation tail of hair is arranged to form the figure of 8 at the back of the Pompadour

How the foundation tail of hair is arranged to form the figure of 8 at the back of the Pompadour

The chignon is thus made, the pad being entirely covered with the exception of a small piece which shows below the hole, between the bottom of the chignon and the neck. This may be covered by leaving a tiny fringe of hair hanging below the foundation, which is now French combed, twisted under, and pinned to the pad, or, better still, by a swathe or coil of hair tied right round the chignon. A torsade coil is a change from a ribbonlike swathe or a plait. It is made from an ordinary switch or plait, which is divided into two strands, and twisted lightly over and over till it forms a double coil. This is fixed round the chignon, resting against the Pompadour front; and it should start just above one ear, being brought round to the same place, where the ends are crossed and slipped under.

As a variation in style a waved chignon with a  torsade,  or tied coil, is effective. To make this, the foundation is tied and drawn through an oval pad fixed low on the head

As a variation in style a waved chignon with a "torsade," or tied coil, is effective. To make this, the foundation is tied and drawn through an oval pad fixed low on the head

The appearance when finished of the Pompadour with a torsade coil

The appearance when finished of the Pompadour with a torsade coil