Required : Two dozen Seville oranges. Double their weight in lump sugar. Six lemons. Water.

Wash and rub the oranges well in cold water to clean them. Put them in a pan with enough cold water to float them, and boil them until the rinds are soft enough to be easily pierced with the head of a pin. Then drain off the water, cut each orange in quarters, and remove all the pips.

A marmalade cutter., This excellent machine, which costs about 14s. 6d., will cut three oranges per minute. It is safe and easy to manipulate, and cuts the oranges and lemons into uniform slices

A marmalade cutter., This excellent machine, which costs about 14s. 6d., will cut three oranges per minute. It is safe and easy to manipulate, and cuts the oranges and lemons into uniform slices

Put them into a basin with one pint of cold water and let them stand for twelve hours. Next remove all the pulp from the oranges and put it into another basin, mash it well with a fork to get rid of all lumps. Next scrape the empty skins of the oranges until they are quite clean, and with a sharp knife slice them as thinly and evenly as possible.

Drain the water from the pips on to the loaf sugar and add the strained lemon-juice. Boil this syrup until it is as thick as oil, stirring it frequently. Next add the orange pulp, shredded rinds, and if necessary the apple-juice. Boil gently until when a few drops are allowed to get cold on a plate they set in a jelly. It will probably take half an hour, or perhaps considerably longer if the fruit is very juicy. Put it into clean, dry jars, and when cold cover them. Cost, from 4s. 6d. A cheaper variety may be made by using a few sweet oranges; this is excellent for children, and many persons prefer it to the rather more bitter flavour of the Seville marmalade.