Second, Prize Figure Skating Championship of the World, 1902, London ; Lady Figure Skating Champion of the International Skating Union, 1906, Davos, 1907, Vienna; Winner of the Ladies' Figure Skating Competition, Olympic Games, 1908, London ;

Figure Skating Champion of Great Britain, 1903, 1904, London, etc.. etc.

Some Further Figures - The Most Difficult of Changes - Double Threes - Brackets-rockers and

Counters

This figure is commenced with the free foot in front, as shown in the photograph, the right shoulder brought well back, knee of tracing leg deeply bent. When nearing the centre, the free leg is brought back ready to take up the succeeding stroke.

The arms should never be raised high when skating the school figures. A reference to the photograph will show that the hands are not above the waist.

Nos. 5a and 5b. Change of Edge Forwards

I shall describe these figures as commenced on the right foot, but the same methods are to be applied when the figure is commenced on the left foot.

No. 4  The back inside eight, begun with the free foot in front. The [arms should never be raised high when skating school figures

No. 4- The back inside eight, begun with the free foot in front. The [arms should never be raised high when skating school figures

The position for the first edge is the same as that for the forward outward edge; when a half circle is nearly completed, the free foot is swung in front of, and a little across, the tracing leg, and immediately back to the first position for the forward inside edge. At the same moment the right shoulder is brought back and the left forward.

The second half of the figure is commenced on the left foot in the forward inside position. When the half circle is nearly completed, the free leg is brought in front of, and well across the tracing leg. It is then swung back to the first position for forward outside, the left shoulder leading.

The knee of the "tracing leg should be springy when changing the edge in these figures; they are also helped by a sinking of the body immediately before each change and a raising of it immediately after it has been effected.

Nos. 6a and 6b. Change of Edge Backwards

This figure is commenced in the backward outside position; to make the change of edge the free foot is swung behind the tracing foot, and immediately forward again. The knee of the tracing leg is strongly bent, and the left shoulder, which has been kept back, is brought slightly forward. The first curve of the second half of the figure is skated with the free foot in front as shown in No. 4 It is then swung behind and across the tracing foot, and the left shoulder brought right back in the position shown in No. 5 (in which the skater is on the right foot). To effect the change from this position, the free foot is swung in front of the tracing foot, and the right shoulder thrown back to the position of No. 3. Half way round the curve the free foot is swung behind, ready to recommence the figure.

The foregoing change of edge is very difficult, and but few skaters attain to proficiency in it. It must be practised assiduously, and great care must be taken to ensure that the position shown in No. 5 is correctly followed.

No. 7. The Forward Outside Three

The first half of the circle is skated in the forward outside position; as the skater nears the turn, the left shoulder is brought well round and the body rotated.

This turn should be made with an easy swing, and the left shoulder thrown back immediately after, with the head turned in the direction of progress.

The position of the free foot is not altered when skating the figure.

Nos. 8a and 8b. The Forward Outside and Back

Inside Threes

The first curve and the turn in this figure are skated as No. 1; after the turn the position is held until the stroke is made on the left foot for the second half of the figure.

The stroke from backward outside to backward inside having been taken, the free foot is held in front, and the left shoulder and head slightly turned in the direction of progress.

When approaching and making the backward inside three, the skater should feel that she is travelling well back on the skate, otherwise a clean turn can never be made.

The turn must be made with a rapid flick of the tracing foot.

Nos. 9a and 9b. The Forward Inside and Back Outside Threes

The inside edge is begun with the right shoulder forward. As the turn is approached, the shoulder is brought further round, the free foot is held behind the tracing foot, and its position is not altered after the turn. The turn is to be made with an easy swing, and the left shoulder at once thrown back, with the head turned in the direction of progress.

The second half of the figure is begun in the position of No. 3 ; the turn is assisted by an outward rotation from the hip of the free leg. It is made with a quick movement, not swung.

After the turn the free foot is held in front, where it remains until the completion of the figure.

Nos. 10, 11, 12, 13. Double Threes

These figures are continuations of the threes above described, and are similarly skated.

The learner will find that she has to overcome a tendency to make the second three too soon in all these figures.

The name double threes is rather misleading. It refers only to the number of turns in each section of the eights. If two complete threes were skated, three turns would have to be introduced.

No. 14. The Forward Outside Loop

Loops are probably the most fascinating of all the turns, and learners are always in a great hurry to get to them.

The forward outside loop should be skated slowly; indeed, all loops should be so skated, with a considerable bending of the tracing leg when commencing the figure, right shoulder in front.