Tureen in dark blue English view ware. Such a specimen could be adapted for use as a fern-bowl with admirable effect. Country seats were a favourite subject with the makers of this ware

J. and W. Ridg-w a y were the makers of a set of views of Oxford and Cambridge in a full blue, of which the flower border is divided by panels of children, cupids, and goats.

From 1820 to 1840 Andrew Stevenson was printing English views upon services. These generally consisted of fine country houses surrounded by a border of large flowers, including the wild rose and foliage, and marked at the back with an urn.

A dish bearing an Irish view in dark blue, with a lace border. Lace borders were often copied from the wallpaper of the period

A dish bearing an Irish view in dark blue, with a lace border. Lace borders were often copied from the wallpaper of the period

From Mrs. ferry Buckley's collection

Dish of view ware in light blue, with a lace border, marked Spode. This famous potter used designs of both English and foreign scenes

Dish of view ware in light blue, with a lace border, marked Spode. This famous potter used designs of both English and foreign scenes

From Mrs. Percy Buckley's collection

James and Ralph Clewes, of Cowbridge, used this style of decoration from 1818 to 1834, and in 1836 James migrated to America, where he essayed to make pottery at Troy, Indiana. Being unable to find the necessary ingredients or competent workmen, he soon failed financially; but by an irony of fate some few years later ex-tensive beds of kaolin were found in close proximity to the site of his factory.

It was this firm who brought out the famous Dr. Syntax and Don Quixote designs, and a set of comic pictures drawn for them by Sir David Wilkie, all of which are much sought after to-day. Amongst the English views are a set, in a dark blue, comprising cathedrals and castles. The borders vary, but are frequently composed of flowers of large size, including the harebell. Sometimes scrolls are used with the flowers. A set of "select views," with these words upon the back, enclosed in a ribbon-tied wreath of foliage, and with the name of the view on a ribbon scroll, are printed in dark blue, with a border of large flowers. A third English series, brought out by Clewes, is the "Zoological Garden views," showing cages of birds and beasts. This series was printed in several colours and had a border of twisted scrolls. Ralph Stevenson, of Cowbridge, whose wares are marked with his name or with the initials R. S., and later (after he had been joined by Williams), R. S. and W., printed his English views, including one of Windsor Castle, in dark blue, with a border of acorns and oak leaves. His "panoramic scenery," marked R. S., is bordered by foliage. Another series, with the same mark, includes Eaton Hall, and has a lace and flower border, and his "British lake" series, printed in several colours, has a border of flowers and scrolls.

A remarkably fine dish of view ware, in deep blue, with a border of flowers and fruit, the handiwork of the famous Rogers Brothers of Staffordshire

A remarkably fine dish of view ware, in deep blue, with a border of flowers and fruit, the handiwork of the famous Rogers Brothers of Staffordshire

From Mrs. Percy Buckley's collection

T. Mager and W. Adams and Son also carried on a trade in view ware, generally employing a blue of deep shade; the former used a border of wheels and trumpet flowers, and the latter foliage, trees, flowers, and scrolls. Mr. Adams decorated his ware with a long series of London views, of which the name appears upon the piece at the back; he also brought out a series of castles.

S. Tams and Co. used dark blue and a border of foliage for a set of buildings such as Drury Lane Theatre and Somerset House, and F. Hall and Sons issued a series marked respectively "Oriental," "Italian," and "Indian," the pictures indicating scenes in those countries. On the Indian may be seen elephants and pagodas, and they are said to have been taken from "Travels in Mesopotamia," a book published in 1828. J. W. Riley bordered his views of country seats with large scrolls. His blue was noted for its fine rich tone, and the name of the firm may be found impressed on the back,

It is said that many of the borders used for this ware in Staffordshire were copied from the wallpaper of the period, especially those in which lace appears.

The Brameld brothers, of Rockingham, ornamented earthenware services with views, in a pale shade of blue. These are marked at the back with the name of the subject, and sometimes, but not always, the name Brameld and a small impressed Maltese cross.

At Swansea this form of decoration was also employed in several colours, including black, brown, and puce, and one or two makers, whose identity I have been unable to establish, printed their views in green and in a very attractive shade of pale green and pink combined.

The Work Of Josiah Spode

Josiah Spode used view decoration on a fine earthenware with a brilliant glaze. He adopted several shades of blue and various borders, and his designs included both foreign and English scenes. The name Spode will be found printed or impressed upon the back or base of each piece.

One of the illustrations shows a particularly charming dish of large size, marked "Rogers." It was made by the Rogers brothers in Staffordshire, between the years 1810 and 1835. The colour is rich blue and the border consists of flowers and fruit.