Amount of juice

Cups

Amount of sugar

Cups

Crabapple

1

2/3

Apple

1

2/3

Blackberry

combined in the following proportions

3/4

1

2/3

Apple

1/4

Currant

1

3/4 to1

Gooseberry (green)

1

1

Grape (underripe)

1

3/4 to 1

Blueberry

1

2/3

Apple

combined in the following proportions. .

1/2

1

2/3

Cherry

1/2

Apple

combined in the following proportions

1/2

1

2/3

Rhubarb

1/2

Apple

combined in the following proportions

1/3

1

..2/3

Blueberry

1/3

Rhubarb

1/3

Apple

combined in the following proportions

1/2

1

2/3

Black Raspberry

1/2

Apple

combined in the following proportions. .

1/2

1

2/3

Quince

1/2

Apple

combined in the following proportions

1/2

1

2/3

Pineapple

1/2

Apple

combined in the following proportions. .

1/2

1

2/3

Peach

1/2

Apple

combined in the following proportions .......................

1/2

1

2/3

Strawberry

1/2

Apple

combined in the following proportions

1/3

1

3/4

Quince

1/3

Cranberry)

1/3

Apple

combined in the following proportions

1/2

1

3/4

Blueberry

1/2

Cooking the Jelly

In general, not more than two quarts of jelly should be cooked at one time. The capacity of the preserving-kettle should be four or five times as great as the amount of juice to be cooked, as there is a tendency for the juice to boil over.

Proportion Of Sugar And Fruit Juice For Jelly 117Proportion Of Sugar And Fruit Juice For Jelly 118

Measure the juice and boil it rapidly for five minutes, skimming it if necessary. Add the sugar and stir the juice until the sugar is dissolved. Heating the sugar seems to save no time, nor does it seem to improve the quality of the jelly. Cook the juice very rapidly, to obtain a bright, clear product; long, slow cooking gives a dull, dark jelly of inferior texture.

Jelly Test - To test the jelly, take up a small amount of the juice in a spoon and allow it to drop from the side of the spoon. When the drops flow together and sheet from the spoon, the jelly is done and should be removed from the heat at once.