books

previous page: The Blue Grass Cook Book | by Minnie C. Fox
  
page up: Cook Books and Recipes
  
next page: Lessons In Cookery | by Thomas K. Chambers

Mrs. Lincoln's Boston Cook Book | by Mary J. Lincoln



What to do and what not to do in cooking. A collection of receipts, given briefly for the experienced housekeeper, and with sufficient clearness for the beginner, but which shall also embody enough of physiology, and of the chemistry and philosophy of food, to make every principle intelligible to a child and interesting to the mature mind.

TitleMrs. Lincoln's Boston Cook Book
AuthorMary J. Lincoln
PublisherLittle, Brown, And Company
Year1903
Copyright1903, Little, Brown, And Company
AmazonMrs. Lincoln's Boston Cook Book

Mrs. Lincoln, First Principal Of The Boston Cooking School, And Culinary Editor Of "The American Kitchen Magazine." Author Of "Carving And Serving," "Boston School Kitchen Text-Book," "Twenty Lessons In Cookery," "The Peerless Cook Book," And "A Cook Book For A Month At A Time."

Containing Over 250 Additional Recipes.

"Not to know at large of things remote From use, obscure and subtle, but to know That which before us lies in daily life, Is the prime wisdom." - Milton.

"To know what you do know, and not to know what you do not know, is true knowledge."- Confucius.

-Preface To The Revised Edition
When the Boston Cook Book was first published, cooking schools were in their infancy, and some suggestions as to their management were included in its pages. But now, after sixteen years' disseminat...
-Preface To First Edition
To compile a book which shall be not only a collection of receipts, given briefly for the experienced housekeeper, and with sufficient clearness for the beginner, but which shall also embody enough of...
-Books Of Reference
Among the many valuable authorities on subjects connected with food, the following have been consulted in preparing this work. The Cook Books are named, not according to their merit, but in the order ...
-Cookery
Cookery is the art of preparing food for the nourishment of the human body. When given its proper importance in the consideration of health and comfort, it must be based upon scientific principles of ...
-Fire
Fire is heat and light produced by the combustion of Inflammable substances. Combustion is a chemical operation carried on in the air, or the chemical union of the oxygen of the air with some combusti...
-Fuel
The materials generally used as fuel are wood, charcoal, coal, kerosene oil, and gas. Soft woods, such as pine or birch, kindle quickly, produce intense heat, and are best for a quick, blazing fire...
-The Making And Care Of A Coal Fire
If you intend to buy a new stove or range, get one simple in construction, that you may quickly learn all its parts and their uses; plain in finish, that you may easily keep it clean; and perfectly fi...
-Boiling
The term boiling is often used erroneously in cookery. The expressions the teakettle boils, the rice is boiling, boiled beef, etc., are all good illustrations of the rhetorical figure metonymy...
-Boiling. Continued
Second. Meats are cooked in water to have the nutriment wholly in the liquid, as in soups and meat teas. Cut the meat in small pieces; soak in cold water, the longer the better; heat gradually, and ke...
-Frying
Frying is cooking in hot fat, - not boiling fat, as it is so often called, for fat can be made much hotter than the temperature required for cooking, which is 385; the temperature for boiling fat is f...
-The Test For Hot Fat
When the fat begin? to smoke put in a bit of bread; if it brown quickly, or while you can count sixty as the clock ticks, it is hot enough for fried potatoes, doughnuts, etc. When hot enough to brown ...
-Fat For Frying
Lard, a mixture of half suet and half lard, drippings, or oil, may be used for frying. Suet and drippings are cheapest, and are preferred by many. Suet used alone cools very quickly and leaves a tallo...
-Sauteing
The ordinary way of frying in a shallow pan with only a little fat, first on one side and then on the other, which the French call sautéing, answers very well for some purposes, - omelets, fried cakes...
-How To Clarify Fat
Any uncooked fat, such as suet, the fat from chickens, and all superfluous beef fat, should be saved and clarified, or made pure and clear. Cut the fat into small pieces, cover with cold water, and co...
-Egg And Bread Crumbing
Hints on saving bread crusts and stale pieces, for egg and bread crumbing, are given on page 75. The crumbs should be sifted through a fine sieve. For fish or meat mix a little salt, pepper, and chopp...
-Roasting
Roasting (meaning to heat violently) is cooking before an open fire; it implies the action of a much greater degree of heat than that employed in any of the previously specified methods of cooking. ...
-Broiling
Broiling (meaning to burn) is cooking directly over the hot coals. The degree of heat is so intense that the articles to be cooked would be very quickly burned, were they allowed to remain for any l...
-Time Tables For Cooking
Baking Bread, Cake, and Puddings. Loaf bread .... 40 to 60 m. Rolls, biscuit . . . 10 to 20 Graham gems . . ...
-Time Tables For Cooking. Continued
Boiling Water, l qt. over gas, covered 1 5 m. Water, 1 qt. over gas,uncovered red 4 Coffee ..... 3 to 5 ...
-Larding
Many kinds of meat which are very lean and dry are improved by the addition of some kind of fat. The tenderloin or fillet of beef, the thick part of the leg of veal, grouse, and liver, are often prepa...
-Boning
Any one who can use a sharp knife, and scrape meat or fish from a bone, without cutting her own flesh, can bone anything, from the smallest bird, chop, or fish, to a leg or forequarter of lamb, or a t...
-Measuring
It has been said that good cooks never measure anything. They do. They measure by judgment and experience; and until you have a large share of both these essential qualities, use your spoon and cup ...
-Table Of Proportions
1 scant measure of liquid to 3 full measures of flour, for bread. 1 scant measure of liquid to 2 full measures of flour, for muffins. 1 scant measure of liquid to 1 full measure of flour, for batters....
-Mixing
Next to care in measuring comes the manner of mixing. The most accurate measurement of the best materials is often rendered useless by a neglect to put them together properly, and the blame is usually...
-Table Of Average Cost Of Material Used In Cooking
1 cup of flour or meal . . . 30.01 1 sugar .03 1 butter..... 15 to .20 1 egg............... ...
-Bread And Bread Making
Importance Of Bread Bread is one of the earliest, the most generally used, and the most important forms of food adopted by mankind. Nothing in the whole range of domestic life more affects the heal...
-Chemical Composition Of Wheat
Wheat is the only grain which contains gluten in the proper proportion and of the desired quality essential to the making of light, spongy bread. It contains all the elements necessary for the growth ...
-Preparing The Flour
St. Louis Process There are several methods of converting wheat into flour. One is by grinding between two horizontal stones, the upper one revolving, and the lower one stationary. The surface of t...
-Preparing The Flour. Continued
Minnesota The Minnesota, or patent-process, flour is now considered one of the best grades. The Washburn, Pillsbury, and many other mills located in Minneapolis are the largest flour-mills in the w...
-The Tests Of Good Flour
The first requisite in making good bread is to use good flour. Good flour should not be pure white in color, but of a creamy, yellowish-white shade. If it feel damp, clammy, or sticky, and gradually f...
-Bread, Fermented And Unfermented
Now, having discussed the subject of the flour, the next step in order is the different ways of making it into bread. These may all be included under two divisions, - those made by fermentation, and t...
-Yeast Bread The Result Of Chemical Changes
Bread properly made with yeast undergoes certain chemical changes which render it lighter, more porous, more pleasant to the taste, and more healthful, because more easily digested, and more convenien...
-Unfermented Bread
This is made without yeast; but the principle is the same as in fermented bread, namely, the liberation of gas within the dough. The gas escapes quickly, and all such bread must be baked as soon as po...
-The Best Kinds Of Yeast
Who made the first yeast? and how does a young housekeeper start her own, when away from stores or friends, where she can neither buy nor borrow? are questions often asked. Simply make a thin batter w...
-Making The Dough
Flour is moistened, or made into dough, with water or with milk. This softens the gluten and starch, dissolves the sugar, and cements all the particles together. Those who prefer water claim that wate...
-Making The Dough. Continued
Sugar In Bread Many object to the use of sugar in bread. Flour in its natural state contains sugar; this sugar is changed in fermentation. Just enough sugar to restore the natural sweetness, but no...
-Kneading The Dough
Kneading is the process of pressing or working the dough in such a manner that the flour and water may be thoroughly mixed, and the yeast be so evenly distributed that the fermentation may be equal th...
-Temperature And Time For The Raising Of Bread
In winter the water or milk used in mixing should be lukewarm; and if the flour be kept in a very cold place, warm it before using. In summer the water need not be warmed, neither should it be ice-wat...
-Shaping Into Loaves Or Biscuit
At least an hour before the time for baking, scrape the dough from the bowl, and turn it out upon the board, which should be dusted with flour; knead it slightly, and divide into the proper proportion...
-The Temperature For Baking
The object of baking bread is to kill the ferment, rupture the starch grains, fix the air cells, and form a nicety flavored crust. Bread could be baked by steam, as the air cells become fixed at 212&d...
-The Care Of Bread After Baking
Remove the loaves immediately from the pans, and place them where the air can circulate freely round them and thus carry off the gas which has been formed, but is no longer needed. A bread or cake coo...
-How To Make Yeast
Raw Potato Yeast ¼ cup flour. ¼ cup sugar. 1 tablespoonful salt. 3 raw potatoes. 1 to 2 quarts boiling water. 1 cup yeast. First, see that you have at least three quarts of water ...
-How To Make Bread
Water Bread 2 quarts sifted (new-process) flour. 1 teaspoonful salt. 1 tablespoonful sugar. 1 tablespoonful butter, or drippings, or lard. ½ cup liquid yeast, or, ½ cake compressed yeast, dissol...
-How To Make Bread. Continued
Thirded Bread 1 cup white flour (St. Louis). 1 cup rye flour, or sifted rye meal. 1 cup yellow corn meal. 1 teaspoonful salt. 3 tablespoonfuls sugar. ½ cup yeast. Mix with milk (s...
-How To Make Raised Biscuit And Rolls
The name biscuit is from the French, and means twice baked. It was originally applied to a kind of hard, thin bread, made in that manner to deprive it of all moisture and insure its remaining in g...
-Rolls
Rolls are made by rolling the raised dough into small forms, with the hands or with a rolling-pin, and afterward cutting and folding into the desired shape; the shape and manner of manipulation giving...
-How To Make Bread Rolls
Sticks 1 cup milk, scalded. ¼ cup butter. 1 tablespoonful sugar. ½ teaspoonful salt. ¼ cake compressed yeast, or 3 tablespoonfuls liquid yeast. White of 1 egg. About 4 cups flour. Melt the bu...
-How To Make Rusks
Rusk, No. 1 1 cup milk, scalded and cooled. 1 tablespoonful sugar. ½ teaspoonful salt. ¼ cup yeast. 2 cups flour. Mix in a sponge at night or very early in the morning. When well risen, add f...
-How To Make Raised Bread Cake, Or Loaf Cake
This is similar to rusks and bunns, only richer; and as it improves by keeping, it is well to make a large quantity. At night mix one pint of milk, scalded and cooled, one teaspoonful of salt, half...
-How To Make Stale Bread
Uses For Stale Bread All bread crumbs left on the plates or bread board or in the bread jar, any broken pieces not suitable for toast, and any crusts or trimmings of toast should be carefully colle...
-How To Make Bread Brewis
Brown Bread Brewis Break one pint of dry brown bread and half a cup of stale white bread into inch pieces. Put a tablespoonful of butter in a large frying-pan, and when it is melted, but not brown,...
-How To Make Toast
Bread is toasted, or dried and browned, before the fire to extract the moisture and make it more palatable and digestible. If the slices be cut thick and carelessly exposed to a blazing fire, the outs...
-Soda Biscuit, Muffins, Gems, Etc
In making biscuit, etc., our grandmothers used saleratus, an alkali prepared by exposing pearlash, i. e., purified potash, to carbonic acid gas. Potash is a fixed alkali made from wood ashes. Now soda...
-Baking-Powders
The most reliable and convenient quick leavening agent is a pure cream of tartar baking-powder. If pure, it will contain only soda bicarbonate and cream of tartar mixed by weight in the correct propor...
-How To Make Biscuits
Soda And Cream Of Tartar Biscuit 1 quart sifted flour. 1 even teaspoonful salt. 1 even teaspoonful soda, measured after pulverizing. 2 full teaspoonfuls cream of tartar. 1 large tablespoonful bu...
-How To Make Short Cakes
Short Cakes, No. 1 1 pint sifted flour. ½ teaspoonful salt, scant. ½ teaspoonful soda, measured after pulverizing. 1 full teaspoonful cream of tartar (omit if sour milk be used). ¼ cup butter...
-How To Make Apple and Huckleberry Cake
Dutch Apple Cake. (Mrs. A. A. Lincoln.) 1 pint flour. ½ teaspoonful salt. ½ teaspoonful soda, sifted into the flour. 1 teaspoonful cream of tartar.1 ¼ cup butter. 1 egg. 1 scant cup mil...
-How To Make Muffins
Raised Flour Muffins Or Sally Lunns (With Yeast) 1 cup milk, scalded and cooled. ½ teaspoonful salt, scant. 1 teaspoonful sugar. ¼ cup yeast. 1 egg, yolk and white beaten separately. Flour en...
-How To Make Muffins. Continued
Tea Cake (Loaf) 1 pint flour. ½ teaspoonful soda and 1 teaspoonful cream of tartar, or 3 level teaspoons baking-powder. ½ teaspoonful salt. 3 eggs, yolks beaten and mixed with 3 tablespoonfuls s...
-How To Make Corn Cake
Apple Johnny Cake (Without Eggs). (Mrs. Webb.) 1 pint white meal. 2 tablespoonfuls sugar. ½ teaspoonful salt. ½ teaspoonful soda and Mix in the order given thirty minutes. 1 teaspoonful...
-How To Make Gems And Crusts
Rice Crusts. (Miss Ward.) Cook one cup of cold boiled rice in the double boiler in milk enough to make a thin mixture, and until the rice is very soft. Add one tablespoonful of sugar, a little salt...
-How To Make Wafers
Graham Wafers 1 pint white flour. 1 pint Graham flour. cup butter. 1/3 cup sugar. 1 saltspoonful salt. Cold water enough to make a stiff dough. Roll out very thin, cut in squares, and bake qu...
-Waffles, Griddle-Cakes, Pancakes, Etc
The names pancakes, fritters, flap-jacks, slap-jacks, batter-cakes, griddle-cakes, slappers, etc., are applied indiscriminately in different localities. Pancakes were formerly a kind of muffin mixt...
-How To Make Waffles And Griddle-Cakes
A waffle iron is made of two corrugated iron griddles fitted and fastened together at one side with a hinge, and revolving in an iron frame, which is to be placed over the fire. It may be either circu...
-How To Cook Griddle-Cakes
A soapstone griddle, which needs no greasing, is the best; but of whatever material, let it be large enough to hold seven cakes. Let it heat while you are making the cakes. If an iron griddle be used,...
-How To Make Pancakes
French Pancakes (No Soda). (Miss Parloa.) 3 eggs. 1 cup milk. ½ teaspoonful salt. 1 teaspoonful sugar. ½ cup flour. ½ tablespoonful salad oil. Beat the yolks and whites separately...
-How To Make Doughnuts
Sour Milk Doughnuts. (Mrs. Henderson.) Two eggs, beaten light, one cup of sugar, three even table-spoonfuls of melted butter, one cup of sour milk (or if sweet milk be used, add one teaspoonful of ...
-How To Make Crullers
Crullers. (A. W.) 1 tablespoonful melted butter. 2 heaping tablespoonfuls sugar. 1 egg, yolk and white beaten separately. ½ saltspoonful cinnamon or mace. ½ saltspoonful salt. Flour enough...
-How To Make Fritters
Fritter Batter (For Oysters, Clams, Or Fruit) Yolks of two eggs, beaten well; add half a cup of milk or water, and one tablespoonful of olive oil, one saltspoonful of salt, and one cup of flour, or...
-Oatmeal, Indian Corn, And Other Grains Used As Food
Oatmeal is highly nutritious, being richer in nitrogen than any other grain; but as it does not contain a tough, adhesive gluten, like wheat, it is not easily made into fermented bread. Its nitrogenou...
-How To Make Mush
Oatmeal Mush One cup of B. B. oatmeal, and one teaspoonful of salt, to a scant quart of boiling water. Put the meal and salt in the top of the double boiler; add the boiling water. Place the upper ...
-Beverages. How to Make Tea
There are three varieties of the tea-plant; both black and green tea can be prepared from them all. Green tea is made from young leaves steamed, roasted, and dried quickly on copper plates. Black tea ...
-How To Make Coffee
Coffee grows on small trees. Mocha, the best variety, is grown in Arabia. Other choice kinds come from Java, the West Indies, and South America. The fruit of the coffee tree is something like the cher...
-How To Make Coffee. Continued
Roasting Coffee Put one pound of raw coffee in a small frying-pan. Place it on the stove, and shake and stir occasionally for fifteen minutes, or till yellow. Then cover it, and increase the heat, ...
-How To Serve Coffee
Cream, scalded milk, and block sugar are essential to good breakfast coffee. Put in one tablespoonful of cream and two tablespoonfuls of milk, and fill the cup three fourths full. Never fill to overfl...
-How To Make Cocoa And Chocolate Beverages
Cocoa is the fruit of a small tree which grows in Mexico, Central America, and the West Indies. The fruit is shaped like a large, thick cucumber, and contains from six to thirty beans. The beans are r...
-How To Make Soup
Nothing can be easier than to make a good soup if one only knows how and has the will to do it: and if one will, it is easy to know how. Considerations of econ-onry and healthfulness make it the duty ...
-Soups With Stock
Soups made with stock include all the varieties made from beef, veal, mutton, and poultry. Perhaps a glance at the meaning of the word stock will make clear its application to cookery. Stock is from t...
-Soups With Stock. Continued
The proportions of bone and meat should be about equal by weight. When ready to begin the stock, wipe the fresh meat with a clean cloth wet in cold water. Never put the meat in a pan of cold water to ...
-How To Clear Soup Stock
Remove the fat, and allow the white and shell of one egg for every quart of stock. If you wish to flavor the stock more highly, add half a saltspoonful of celery seed and the thinnest possible shaving...
-Recipes to Make Soup
Brown Soup Stock 6 pounds hind shin of beef. 6 quarts cold water. 10 whole cloves. 10 whole peppercorns. 10 allspice. Bouquet of sweet herbs. 1 large tablespoonful salt 3 small on...
-Recipes to Make Soup. Part 2
Julienne Soup 1 quart stock. 1 pint mixed vegetables. ½ teaspoonful salt. ½ saltspoonful pepper. Cut the celery into thin slices, the turnip into quarter-inch dice, and the carrot into thr...
-Recipes to Make Soup. Part 3
Mixed Vegetable Soup 1 quart stock. 1 quart boiling water. 1 cup each chopped onion, carrot, and celery. ½ cup each chopped turnip, parsnip, and cabbage. 1 cup strained tomatoes. 1 t...
-Recipes to Make Soup. Part 4
Cream Of Canned Peas 1 can peas. 1 pint hot water. 1 qt. milk. 1 teasp. salt. 1 saltsp. pepper. ½ teasp. sugar. 1 tbsp. butter. 1 tbsp. flour. Turn the peas from the can into a colander and p...
-Caramel, For Coloring Soups, Etc
Melt one cup of sugar (either brown or white) with one tablespoonful of water in a frying-pan. Stir until it becomes of a dark brown color. Add one cup of boiling water; simmer ten minutes, and bottle...
-How To Thicken Soups
Soups are thickened with flour, cornstarch, or rice flour: one tablespoonful for a quart of soup, - heaping, if flour; scant, if rice flour or cornstarch. Flour is the cheapest, but cornstarch gives a...
-How to Make Soups
Mock Turtle Soup 1 calf's head. 4 quarts cold water. 1 tablespoonful salt. 6 cloves. 6 peppercorns. 6 allspice. ½ inch stick cinnamon. Bouquet of herbs. 2 onions. 1 carrot. ...
-How to Make Soups. Part 2
Ox-Tail Soup 2 ox-tails. 1 large onion. 1 tablespoonful beef drippings. 4 quarts cold water. 1 tablespoonful salt. 1 tablespoonful mixed herbs. 4 cloves. 4 peppercorns. Wash...
-How to Make Soups. Part 3
Mutton Broth Allow one quart of cold water to each pound of meat and bone. Break the bones and cut the meat (which should be lean) into small pieces. Cover with cold water and heat slowly. Add one ...
-How to Make White Soups
White Soup Stock White soup stock is made from veal or chicken, seasoned with onion, celery salt, and white pepper, avoiding anything which will give it color. White soups are thickened with rice, ...
-Material To Be Served With Soup
Croutons, Or Fried Bread. No. 1 Cut stale bread into half-inch slices, remove the crusts, and cut into half-inch cubes; put them in a frying-basket, plunge into fat hot enough to brown them while y...
-How To Make Soups Without Stock
Any of the soups or purees in this division may be attempted before one has mastered the imaginary difficulties of stock-making. They are palatable, nutritious, inex pensive, and quickly prepared. ...
-How To Make Soups Without Stock. Part 2
Mock Bisque Soup ½ can tomatoes. 1 quart milk. 1/3 cup butter. 1 tablespoonful cornstarch. 1 teaspoonful salt. ½ saltspoonful white pepper. Stew the tomatoes until soft enough to strain...
-How To Make Soups Without Stock. Part 3
Split Pea Soup 1 cup dried split peas. 3 pints cold water. 1 tablespoonful butter. 1 tablespoonful flour. ½ teaspoonful sugar. 1 teaspoonful salt. 1 saltspoonful white pepper. Pick over...
-How To Make Seafood Soups
Fish Soup 1 pound any boiled fish, - salmon, cod, or halibut. 1 quart milk. 1 slice onion. 1 tablespoonful butter. 2 tablespoonfuls flour. 1 teaspoonful salt. 1 saltspoonful pepper. Coo...
-How To Cook Fish Chowder
4 or 5 pounds cod or haddock or bass. 6 potatoes. A 2-inch cube of fat salt pork. 2 small onions. 1 tablespoonful salt. ½ teaspoonful white pepper. 1 tablespoonful butter. 1 quart milk....
-How To Cook Fish Chowder. Continued
Clam Chowder ½ peck clams in the shells. 1 quart potatoes, sliced thin. A 2-inch cube of fat salt pork. 1 or 2 onions. 1 teaspoonful salt. ½ teaspoonful white pepper. 1 large tablespoonful butte...
-How To Cook Fish
Fish, on account of its abundance, cheapness, and wholesomeness, is invaluable as an article of food. It is less nutritious and less stimulating than meat, as it contains less solid matter and more wa...
-How To Clean A Fish
If the fish have scales, remove them before opening. Scrape with a small, sharp knife from the tail to the head; hold the knife flat and slanting, resting it on the fish, that the scales may be taken ...
-How To Skin A Fish
Cut a thin, narrow strip down the backbone, taking off the dorsal fin. Then open the lower part half-way down. Slip the knife under and up through the bony part of the gills, and hold this bony part b...
-How To Broil Fish
First clean the fish. Wash with a cloth wet in salt water and dry on a clean fish towel, kept for no other purpose. Mackerel, white-fish, small blue-fish, trout, small cod, and ii shad should be split...
-How To Bake Fish
Cod, haddock, cusk, blue-fish, small salmon, bass, and shad may be stuffed, and baked whole. Fig. 7. Baked Fish. Stuffing For Baked Fish Weighing From Four To Six Pounds 1 cup cracker c...
-General Directions Stuffing Fish
Fish bake through more evenly, brown better, and are more easily served, if placed upright in the pan instead of on one side. Fish that are broad and short, like shad, may be kept in place by propping...
-How To Serve The Fish
Make an incision along the backbone the entire length of the fish; then draw the fish away from the bone on each side, cutting at right angles with the bone. Raise the bone to reach the stuffing, and ...
-No. 3. Baked Halibut
Three or four pounds of halibut. Dip the dark skin in boiling water, and scrape clean. Rub well with salt and pepper. Put it into a clean pan, and pour milk over it till half an inch deep. Bake about ...
-How To Fry Fish
Mackerel, salmon, blue-fish, and all oily fish should never be fried. Smelts, perch, and other small pan-fish may be fried whole. When fried smelts are used as a garnish, fry them in the shape ...
-How To Boil Fish
Boiling is the most insipid and wasteful way of cooking fish. To make boiled fish palatable, a rich sauce, like lobster, oyster, or shrimp sauce, is needed for all kinds except salmon and blue-fish. S...
-How To Stew Fish
Any dry white fish or fresh-water fish may be stewed, and made into a very palatable and economical dish. Remove the skin, head, and bones from a four-pound fish. Cover the bones and head with cold wa...
-Fish A La Creme
Four to six pounds of fish, one to one and a half pints of cream sauce, and one cup of cracker crumbs, moistened in one third of a cup of melted butter. This is one of the most attractive and conve...
-What to Do With Remnants Of Cooked Fish
Remnants of cold boiled or baked fish (using stuffing and sauce also) may be freed from skin and bones, flaked, and used in any of the following ways: - Scalloped Fish Put fish and stuffing into...
-How To Make Potted Fish
Three shad or six small mackerel, uncooked; one third of a cup of salt with half a saltspoonful of cayenne pepper mixed with it, and half a cup of whole spices, - cloves, peppercorns, and allspice mix...
-How To Make Salt Fish Balls
1 cup raw salt fish. 1 pint potatoes. 1 teaspoonful butter. 1 egg, well beaten. ¼ saltspoonful pepper. More salt, if needed. Wash the fish, pick in half-inch pieces, and free from bo...
-How To Prepare Salt Fish For Cooking
Soak over night in cold water with the skin side up, that the salt may be drawn out; or, if you can, strip the skin off before soaking. By changing the water often, less time will be required. Salt ma...
-More Ways To Cook Fish
Halibut A La Conant In a baking pan put three thin slices of fat salt pork about two inches square, three slices of onion and a bit of bay leaf. On top of these lay a two-pound slice of halibut, sp...
-How To Cook Swordfish
This valuable sea food has many friends among those who have eaten it at its best, and especially after the excitement of chasing it through the briny waves. But tastes differ, and some people dislike...
-Table Of The Cost, Etc., Of Fish
Cost. Weight. How sold. When in Season. Cod. 8 cts. per lb. 3 to 20 lbs. Whole. ...
-How To Cook Oysters
How To Cook Oysters These shell fish are found in perfection in the cool waters of the Northern Atlantic coast. The Blue Points from Long Island are considered the best in the New York market. The ...
-How To Cook Oysters. Continued
Smothered Oysters Put one tablespoonful of butter in a covered saucepan with half a saltspoonful of white pepper, one teaspoonful of salt, and a few grains of cayenne pepper. When hot, add one pint...
-How To Cook Clams
Thin shell clams, and round shell clams, or quahaugs, furnish a delicious and wholesome form of food if eaten only when fresh. They are more easily opened and have a finer flavor when cooked in the sh...
-How To Cook Scallops and Shrimp
Scallops This shell fish has a round, deeply grooved shell. The muscle which unites the shell is the only part eaten. Scallops have a sweet flavor, and are in season during the fall and winter. The...
-How To Cook Lobsters
The markets are now so well supplied with these delicious shell fish, that they may be obtained in good condition all the year. The canned lobster is also convenient in an emergency, for use in soups ...
-How To Cook Crabs
These are found near the coast of the Southern and Middle States, and are considered such a luxury in Maryland that special means are taken for their propagation. They are usually quite expensive in E...
-How To Cook Reptiles
Fried Frogs Frogs are considered a delicacy by those who have cultivated a taste for them. If not already prepared for cooking, remove the skin from the hind legs, which is the only part used. Dip ...
-How To Cook Meat And Fish Sauces
Drawn Butter, or water and melted butter thickened with flour, and seasoned, is the simplest form of a sauce. When milk, or cream, or white stock is used in place of water, less butter is required,...
-How To Make Cream Sauce
Cream Sauce, No. 1 1 pint hot cream. 1 heaping tablespoonful butter. 2 heaping tablespoonfuls flour. ½ teaspoonful salt. ½ saltspoonful pepper. Make in the same manner as white sauce, a...
-How To Make White Sauce (For Vegetables, Chicken, Eggs, Etc.)
1 pint milk, or half milk and half white stock. 2 tablespoonfuls butter. 2 heaping tablespoonfuls flour. ½ teaspoonful salt. ½ saltspoonful pepper. Heat the milk over hot water. Put the butte...
-How To Make Bechamel Sauce
A white sauce made partly with cream and partly with rich white stock, either veal or chicken, according to directions for white sauce, is called Bechamel. The water in which celery, oysters, or lo...
-How To Make Brown Sauce
1 pint hot stock. 2 tablespoonfuls minced onion. 2 tablespoonfuls butter. 2 heaping tablespoonfuls flour. ½ teaspoonful salt. ½ saltspoonful pepper. 1 tablespoonful lemon juice. Caramel enoug...
-How To Make Sauces
Olive Sauce (For Roast Duck) Soak twelve olives in hot water enough to cover, thirty minutes, to extract the salt. Pare them round and round, close to the stone, leaving the pulp in a single piece,...
-How To Make Sauces. Continued
Soubise Sauce (For Lamb Or Mutton Chop) Boil three large onions till very soft. Drain, and rub the onion through a sieve. Stir the onion pulp into half a pint of white sauce made with milk or cream...
-How To Make Tomato Sauce
Tomato Sauce (For Macaroni) Stew half a can of tomatoes and half a small onion ten minutes. Rub all the tomato pulp through a strainer. Cook one tablespoonful of butter and one heaping tablespoonfu...
-How To Make Tartar Sauce
Tartar Sauce (For Broiled Or Devilled Chicken) One tablespoonful each of mustard, Chili vinegar, shalot vinegar, and claret wine, and two tablespoonfuls of Harvey sauce. Heat in a bowl over hot wat...
-How To Cook Eggs
Whatever else you may economize in, do not limit your family in respect to eggs. They are nutritious, and even at four cents each are cheaper than meat. They should be used freely by all except those ...
-How To Cook Eggs. Continued
Boiled Eggs (The Best Way) Put the eggs in a saucepan, cover with boiling water, and let them stand about ten minutes where the water will keep hot (180), but not boiling. The white should be ...
-How To Make Omelets
Beat the yolks of two eggs till light-colored and thick; add two tablespoonfuls of milk, one saltspoonful of salt, and one fourth of a saltspoonful of pepper. Beat the whites of two eggs till stiff an...
-How To Bake Eggs
Small stone china dishes or egg-shirrers, holding one 01 two eggs for each person, are convenient for this method of serving eggs; or use a common platter placed over hot water; or bake in the shells ...
-Eggs And Minced Meat
Chop one pint of cold chicken, ham. or veal fine, and rub it to a smooth paste; add one table-spoonful of melted butter, one tablespoonful of chopped parsley, salt and pepper to taste, and two beaten ...
-Various Ways Of Serving Hard-Boiled Eggs
Curried Eggs Boil six eggs twenty minutes. Remove the shells and cut into halves or slices. Fry one teaspoon-ful of chopped onion in one tablespoonful of butter, being careful not to burn it; add o...
-Eggs A La Creme
Boil three eggs twenty minutes. Cut off a slice at each end, and cut the eggs in halves crosswise. Remove the yolks, and cut them in thin slices. Mix with them an equal amount of small thin pieces of ...
-Eggs In A Nest
Boil six eggs twenty minutes. Remove the shells. Separate the yolks without breaking; or rub them to a smooth paste with a little olive oil to moisten, and shape into small balls. Cut the whites in th...
-How To Cook Meat
Meat is a general term applied to the flesh of animals used for food. It includes the muscular flesh, sinews, fat, heart, liver, stomach, brains, and tongue. Meat is divided into three classes: - M...
-How To Cook Meat. Continued
Cost Of Meat And Game Shin of beef, 3 to 6 cts. per lb. Middle cut of shir 7 to 10 Lower part of ro...
-How To Cook Beef
Good beef should be bright red, well marbled with yellowish-white fat, and with a thick outside layer of fat. The flesh must be firm, and when pressed with the finger no mark should be left. The suet ...
-How To Cook Beef. Continued
The Fore Quarter Of Beef The back half of the fore quarter has the backbone on the upper edge. The best roasting piece is the first cut of the rib, which joins the tip of the sirloin, and is someti...
-How To Roast Beef
Roast Sirloin Of Beef Six or eight pounds from the tip or second cut of the sirloin, Wipe, trim, and tie or skewer into shape. If there be a large piece of the flank, cut it off, and use it for sou...
-Fillet Of Beef
Wipe, and remove the fat, veins, and tough tendinous portion in the middle. Trim into shape. Lard the upper side (see page 25). Dredge with salt, pepper, and flour. Put several pieces of pork in the p...
-How To Broil Beef
Broiled Steak Wipe, trim off the superfluous fat, and remove the bone. Save the flank end for broiled meat cakes. Grease the gridiron with some of the fat. Broil over a clear fire, turning every te...
-Braised Beef
Four to six pounds of beef from the lower part of the round or face of the rump. Trim, and rub well with salt, pepper, and flour. Cut two small onions into dice, and fry them until light brown in salt...
-Beef A La Mode
Four to six pounds from the under part of the round of beef cut thick. Wipe, and trim off the rough edges. Put it in a deep earthen dish, and pour over it spiced vinegar, made by boiling for five minu...
-Beef Stew With Dumplings
The aitch bone is the nicest piece for a beef stew. There is some very juicy meat on the upper side in the large muscle which lies next to the top of the round, and it will serve a small family for a ...
-How To Make Rolled Flank Of Beef
Four or five pounds of the flank. Wipe, and remove the skin, membrane, and extra fat. Pound and trim until of uniform thickness. Make a stuffing with one cup of cracker crumbs, two tablespoonfuls of f...
-How To Make Corned Beef
Select a piece of beef which has a fair proportion of fat, -the brisket or second cut of rattle rand. If very salt, soak in cold water half an hour. Put on to boil in fresh cold water, enough to cover...
-An Old-Fashioned Boiled Dinner. (Mrs. Poor.)
Notwithstanding that this dish has fallen into ill-repute with many people, it may be prepared so as to be both palatable and nutritious for those who exercise freely. It is more suitable for cold sea...
-How To Cook Mutton And Lamb
Mutton stands next to beef in nutritive qualities, and with many has even more value as food, because more easily digested. In mutton about one half the weight is in fat, while with beef it is only on...
-What To Do With A Fore Quarter Of Mutton
Mutton Duck Select a fore quarter of mutton with the whole length of the leg bone left on. Ask the butcher to cut off what is called a raised shoulder, that is, raised from the backbone and ribs, c...
-What To Do With A Fore Quarter Of Mutton. Continued
Lamb Or Mutton Chops Wipe with a wet cloth; remove the skin and extra fat; have a frying-pan hissing hot, without any fat; put in the chops and cook one minute, turn, and sear the other side; cook ...
-How To Cook Veal
Veal is always in the market, but is better in the spring. The fat should be white and clear; and the lean, pink or flesh color. If the flesh be white, the calf has been bled before being killed, and ...
-How To Cook Veal. Continued
Veal Cutlets. (Joanna Sweeny.') One slice of veal from the leg. Wipe, and remove the bone, skin, and tough membranes. Pound and cut, or shape into pieces for serving. Sprinkle with salt and pepper....
-How To Cook Sweetbreads
The sweetbreads found in veal are considered the best. They are two large glands lying along the back of the throat and in the breast. The lower one is round and compact, and called the heart sweetbre...
-How To Cook Pork
Pork is an unwholesome meat, and should never be eaten by children, or people with weak digestion, nor, indeed, by any one except in cold weather. Salt pork, bacon, and ham are less objectionable than...
-How To Make Boiled Ham
If very salt, let it soak over night Scrub well; trim off the hard black part, cover with cold water, and let it simmer slowly, allowing half an hour to the pound. Take it from the fire; let it remain...
-How To Serve Cold Boiled Ham
Cut in thin slices; season highly with cayenne pepper, or with mustard and lemon juice, and broil two minutes. Melt half a glass of currant jelly; add a teaspoonful of butter, a little pepper, and ...
-How To Make Sausages
If you like to know what you are eating, have your sausage meat prepared at home or by some one whom you can trust. Of sweet fresh pork take one third fat and two thirds lean, and chop fine, or have i...
-How To Cook Poultry And Game
The flesh of poultry and of game birds has less red blood than the flesh of animals; but as it abounds in phosphates, it is valuable food, particularly for invalids. The flesh is drier, and not marble...
-How To Clean And Truss Poultry And Game
The practice of sending poultry to market undressed is one that demands as earnest opposition from housekeepers as that of the adulteration of food. The meat is rendered unfit to eat, is sometimes inf...
-How To Cut Up A Fowl For A Fricassee
Cut through the loose skin between the legs and body, bend the leg over, and cut off at the joint; then cut off the wings. Make an incision in the skin near the vent, and cut the membrane lying betwee...
-How To Clean The Giblets
Slip off the thin membrane round the heart, cut out the veins and arteries, remove the liver, and cut off all that looks green near the gall bladder. Trim the fat and membranes from the gizzard, cut t...
-How To Carve Poultry
Place the fowl on the platter, with the head at the left. Put the fork in across the breastbone. Cut through the skin round the leg joint. Bend the leg over and cut off at the joint. Then cut off the ...
-How To Roast Poultry And Game
Gravy For Roast Poultry And Game Put the giblets, or neck, liver, gizzard, and heart, on to boil in one quart of water, and boil till tender, and the water reduced to one pint. Mash the liver, and ...
-How To Roast Poultry And Game. Part 2
Roast Chicken Singe; remove the pin feathers, oil bag, crop, entrails, legs, and tendons. Wipe, stuff, sew, and tie or skewer into shape. Place it on one side, on a rack in a dripping-pan, without ...
-How To Roast Poultry And Game. Part 3
Roast Ducks Pick, singe, and remove the crop, entrails, oil bag, legs, and pinions. Wipe, truss, dredge with salt, pepper, butter, and flour. Bake in a hot oven twenty minutes if liked rare, or thi...
-How To Cook Chiken
Chicken Fricassee Singe, and cut the chicken at the joints, in pieces for serving Cover with boiling water; add one heaping teaspoonful of salt, and half a saltspoonful of pepper. Simmer one hour, ...
-How To Cook Venison
Venison is one of the most easily digested meats. It may be cooked after the same rules as mutton or beef. It should be cooked rare, and served very hot with currant jelly. The saddle, or loin, is the...
-How To Make Entrees And Meat Rechauffe
Boned Turkey Or Chicken Bone the turkey as directed on page 27. Stuffing For A Hen Turkey Weighing Bight Pounds The meat from a four-pound chicken, one pound of raw, lean veal, one cup of cra...
-How To Make Pressed Chicken
An Easy Way Of Preparing Boneless Chicken Boil a fowl in as little water as possible till the bones slip out and the gristly portions are soft. Remove the skin, pick the meat apart, and mix the dar...
-How To Make Pressed Chicken. Part 2
Chicken Terrapin. (Miss Minot.) Chop one cold roast chicken and one parboiled sweetbread moderately fine. Make one cup of rich cream sauce, with one cup of hot cream, a quarter of a cup of butter, ...
-How To Make Pressed Chicken. Part 3
Fricadilloes, Or Meat Balls, Sausages, Or Rolls Chop the meat fine; add a slice of onion chopped fine, and if the meat be lean, add one or two slices of bacon; season highly with salt, pepper, sage...
-How To Make Pressed Chicken. Part 4
Sandwiches Chop very fine some cooked ham or cold corned beef or tongue with one-fourth part fat. Mix one teaspoonful of dry mustard and one saltspoonful of salt with cold water to a stiff paste; a...
-How To Cook Veal Birds
Slices of veal from the loin, cut very thin. Wipe, remove the bones, skin, and fat, and pound till one fourth of an inch thick. Trim into pieces two and a half by four inches. Chop the trimmings fine ...
-Potting
Chop and pound to a paste any fragments of cooked ham, tongue, beef, poultry, game, or fish. With ham use a quarter part fat. Remove all gristle and skin, and pound till free from and fibre and reduce...
-How To Cook Croquettes
These may be made of any kind of cooked meat, fish, oysters, rice, hominy, and many kinds of vegetables, or from a mixture of several ingredients. When mixed with a thick white sauce (see page 278), w...
-How To Cook Croquettes. Continued
Veal Croquettes Chop cold veal fine; season highly with salt, pepper, cayenne, onion juice, celery salt, and parsley. If you like, add half the amount of oysters, parboiled and drained. Moisten wit...
-How To Prepare Parsnips In The Same Way
Turkish Croquettes Stew half a can of tomatoes fifteen minutes with one slice each of onion, carrot, and turnip, one teaspoonful of herbs, one sprig of parsley, two cloves, two peppercorns, one tea...
-How To Prepare Parsnips In The Same Way. Continued
Welsh Rarebit ¼ pound rich cream cheese. ¼ cup cream or milk. 1 teaspoonful mustard. ½ teaspoonful salt. A few grains of cayenne. 1 egg 1 teaspoonful butter. 4 slices toast. Break the cheese ...
-Forefathers' Dinner
Succotash is the great dish in Plymouth at every celebration of Forefathers' Day, December 22. Tradition says it has been made in that town ever since the Pilgrims raised their first corn and beans, a...
-Hulled Com
Tie a quart of oak wood ashes in a flannel bag, and put it with three gallons of cold water into an iron kettle. Let it boil and become lye, or till the water is black. Put in four quarts of corn, and...
-How To Cook Bean Porridge. (Mrs. C. M. Poor.)
Five pounds of corned beef, not too salt, or four pounds of beef and one of salt pork; one pint of dry white beans, four tablespoonfuls of corn meal, pepper and salt to taste, one pint of hulled corn....
-Cow To Cook Vegetables
Vegetable food, in its widest sense, includes some part of every form of plant growth, - herb, shrub, or tree, -used either as vegetables, fruits, grains, condiments, or beverages. Vegetables, as the ...
-How To Cook Potatoes
The potato is more generally used than any other vegetable. It combines with other foods - meats particularly - to give the desired elements. But it should not be used alone, or in too great a proport...
-How To Cook Potatoes. Continued
Stuffed Potatoes Bake potatoes of equal size; when done, and still hot, cut off a small piece from the end of each potato. Scoop out the inside. Mash, and mix with it half the quantity of cooked me...
-How To Cook Greens
Spinach Pick over, trim off the roots and decayed leaves; wash thoroughly, lifting the spinach from one pan of water into another, that the sand may be left in the water, and changing the water unt...
-How To Cook Beans
String Beans Remove the strings. The surest way to do that is to pare a thin strip from each edge of the pods. Many persons think this unnecessary; but the beans are much more delicate, and two or ...
-How To Cook Green Or Sweet Corn
Remove the husk, and every thread of the silky fibre. Put into boiling water, cover with the clean inner husks, and cook from five to fifteen minutes. Try a kernel, and take up the corn as soon as the...
-How To Cook Succotash
This may be made by mixing equal quantities of shelled beans and corn cut from the cob, having first cooked and seasoned them separately. Or cut the raw corn from the cob, by scoring each row and pres...
-How To Cook Tomatoes
Raw Tomatoes Scald and peel at least an hour before using. Keep them on the ice, and serve with sugar, salt, vinegar, or with Mayonnaise dressing. If very large, they may be sliced before serving. ...
-How To Cook Onions
Pour boiling water over them, and remove the skins. Put them in boiling salted water. When they have boiled five minutes, change the water, and change again after ten minutes. Boil half an hour, or un...
-How To Cook Cauliflower and Cabbage
The leaves should be green and fresh, and the heads creamy white. When there are dark spots, the cauliflower is wilted. Pick off the outside leaves, soak in cold salted water, top downwards, for one h...
-How To Cook Egg Plant
Cut the plant into slices one third of an inch thick, without removing the skin. Sprinkle salt over each slice, pile them, and cover with a weight to press out the juice. Drain, and dip each slice fir...
-How To Cook Artichokes
The Jerusalem Artichoke is a tuber, something like the potato; but as it contains no starch, it is not mealy. Peel and throw at once into cold water and vinegar to preserve the color. Cook in boiling ...
-How To Cook Mushrooms
Peel the top and stalk, break in small pieces, place them in a stewpan, sprinkle slightly with salt and pepper, and let them stand half an hour, until the juice is drawn out. Stew the mushrooms in the...
-How To Cook Winter Squash
If the shell be soft, pare the squash, remove the seeds, and steam or cook in boiling salted water. If the shell be hard, split the squash, remove the seeds, and steam or boil until soft. Scrape out t...
-How To Cook Carrots And Turnips
Carrots and turnips contain, instead of starch, a gelatinous gummy substance, called pectine. They are useful in soups, giving them a fine flavor and color. Soups in which carrots are used are gelatin...
-How To Cook Parsnips
Parsnips contain starch and sugar, a small portion of gluten, and less water than carrots or turnips. They are eaten with salt fish and corned beef. Those which have remained in the ground through the...
-How To Cook Rice
Rice should be thoroughly washed. Turn the rice into a coarse strainer, and place the strainer in a deep dish of cold water. Rub the rice, and lift it in the strainer out of the water, changing the wa...
-How To Cook Macaroni, Spaghetti, And Vermicelli
These are thick pastes made from wheaten flour mixed with a small quantity of water. They are made to take various shapes by being forced through holes in metallic plates. These plates are arranged ov...
-How To Make Mayonnaise Salad Dressing
1 teaspoonful mustard. 1 teaspoonful powdered sugar. ½ teaspoonful salt. ¼ saltspoonful cayenne. Yolks of 2 raw eggs. 1 pint olive oil. 2 tablespoonfuls vinegar. 2 tablespoonfuls ...
-How To Make Salads
Green vegetables which are eaten raw and dressed with oil, acids, salt, and pepper, are classed as salads. Potatoes, string beans, beets, asparagus, cauliflower, and many other vegetables which have b...
-How To Make Salads. Part 2
Dressed Celery Use only the white, crisp part of the celery stalks. The green parts may be made into a puree or used in soups. Scrape off the brown discolored part, and wash thoroughly. Keep in col...
-How To Make Salads. Part 3
Oyster Salad Steam or parboil one pint of oysters. Drain, cool, and marinate them with a French dressing. Serve with cresses, celery, or lettuce, and a May onnaise dressing. Fish Salad One qu...
-How To Make Salads. Part 4
German Cucumber Salad The slightly acid juice of the cucumber is disagreeable to many delicate stomachs, and this is drawn out largely by this method of preparing them. We have been taught that cuc...
-How To Make Salads. Part 5
Apple And Onion Salad Boil one cup of vinegar. If strong, use half water. Mix one teaspoonful mustard, one teaspoonful cornstarch, one-half teaspoonful salt, and one-half saltspoonful pepper with o...
-How To Make Salads. Part 6
Salad In Tomato Jelly Cups Soak one-half box of gelatine in one cup of cold water in which some celery has been stewed. Put into a stewpan one quart can of tomatoes, one. tablespoon of minced parsl...
-How To Make Salads. Part 7
Cream Salad Dressing A small quantity of salad dressing may be made very quickly in an emergency, by simply mixing two teaspoonfuls of vinegar or lemon juice with four tablespoonfuls of sweet or so...
-How To Make Pastry And Pies
Puff Paste, when skilfully made, is light and tender, and so delicate that it cannot be touched without crushing:. It should be thoroughly baked, and is therefore more suitable for tarts and patties a...
-How To Make Puff Paste
One pound of the best butter, one pound of pastry flour, one scant teaspoonful of salt, about one cup of ice water. By measure, use one quart of flour and one pint of butter. Scald the bowl, then fill...
-How To Make Puff Paste. Continued
Keep the edges even while rolling, and fold evenly, that there may be an equal number of layers in all parts. Each time the paste is folded over the butter a small amount of air is enclosed and is ret...
-Patty Shells, Tarts, Vol-Au-Vents, And Other Forms Of Puff Paste
There are two ways of shaping the paste for patties and tarts. First, roll puff paste one eighth of an inch thick, and stamp out circular pieces with a cutter, two and one half inches in diameter. Wit...
-How To Make Pastries
Cupid's Wells Cut the rounds of puff paste of three or four different sizes; use the largest one for the bottom, and cut the centres from the others, leaving the rims of different widths, and put t...
-How To Make Pies
For Pies, roll the puff paste out a quarter of an inch thick, then roll up, and cut from the end of the roll. Turn each piece on the side, so that the folds show in rings, and pat out flat, then roll ...
-How To Make Pies. Part 2
Lemon Pie, No. 1 Mix one heaping tablespoonful of cornstarch with one cup of sugar; add one scant cup of boiling water, and boil five minutes. Add one tea-spoonful of butter, the juice of one large...
-How To Make Pies. Part 3
Squash Pie One cup and a half of stewed and sifted squash, not watery, but dry and mealy, one cup of boiling milk, half a cup of sugar, half a teaspoonful of salt, one saltspoonful of cinnamon, and...
-How To Make Pudding Sauces
Hard Sauce (For Hot Puddings) ¼ cup butter. ½ cup powdered sugar. ½ teaspoonful lemon or vanilla, or a little nutmeg. Rub the butter to a cream in a warm bowl; add the sugar gradually, the...
-How To Make Hot Puddings
Cottage Pudding 2 heaping cups flour. 3½ level teasp. baking-powder. ½ teaspoonful salt. 1 egg. ¾ cup sugar. 3 tablespoonfuls melted butter. 1 cup milk. Mix the salt and baking...
-How To Make Hot Puddings. Part 2
Bird's-Nest Pudding Six or seven apples, cored and pared, and put into a buttered pudding-dish. Mix five teaspoonfuls of flour and one teaspoonful of salt, wet it to a smooth paste with cold milk, ...
-How To Make Hot Puddings. Part 3
Apricots A La Neige Boil one cup of rice fifteen minutes, or steam till tender (see page 307). Wring small pudding-cloths (one third of a yard square) out of hot water, and lay them over a small ha...
-How To Make Bread Pudding
One pint of fine stale bread crumbs, soaked one hour in one quart of milk. Beat two eggs; mix one quarter of a cup of sugar, one teaspoonful of salt, one saltspoonful of nutmeg or cinnamon, and one ta...
-Hot To Make Fruit Hot Puddings
Steamed Fruit Pudding 1 pint flour. 3 level teasp. baking-powder. ½ teaspoonful salt. 1 cup milk. 2 tablespoonfuls melted butter. 2 eggs. ½ cup sugar. 1 pint berries, or ripe f...
-How To Make Custards, Jellies, And Creams
Irish Moss Blanc-Mange ½ cup Irish moss. 1 quart milk. 1 saltspoonful salt. 1 teaspoonful vanilla. Soak the moss in cold water fifteen minutes; pick over, wash, tie in a lace bag, and put it ...
-How To Make Custard
Boiled Custard 1 pint milk. Yolks of 3 eggs. 3 tablespoonfuls sugar. ½ saltspoonful salt. ½ teaspoonful vanilla. Scald the milk. Beat the yolks, add the sugar and salt, and beat well. P...
-How To Make Custard. Continued
Baked Or Steamed Custard 1 quart milk. 6 eggs. 6 tablespoonfuls sugar. 1 saltspoonful salt. Scald the milk. Beat the eggs; add the sugar and salt, then the scalded milk. Strain, add a little ...
-How To Make Jellies
Jellies And Fancy Dishes Made With Gelatine, Custard, And Cream Gelatine, as now obtained, is refined and clarified during the process of manufacture, and this renders it unnecessary to use the whi...
-How To Make Jellies. Continued
Orange Jelly ½ box gelatine.1 ½ cup cold water. 1 cup boiling water. Juice of 1 lemon. 1 cup sugar. 1 pint orange juice. Soak the gelatine in cold water until soft. Add the boiling wate...
-How To Make Charlotte
Orange Charlotte 1/3 box gelatine. 1/3 cup cold water. 1/3 cup boiling water. 1 cup sugar. Juice of 1 lemon. 1 cup orange juice and pulp. 3 eggs (whites). Line a mould or bowl with lady...
-How To Make Cream
Velvet Cream. (Miss Ward.) ½ box gelatine.1 1 ½ cup sherry wine. 1 lemon (grated rind and juice). 1 ½ cup sugar. 1 ½ pint cream. Soak the gelatine in the wine, add the lemon and sugar, ...
-How To Make Cream. Continued
Cream Whips. (Miss Ward.) 1 pint rich cream. 1 cup pale sherry wine. 1 lemon (grated rind and juice). ½ cup sugar. Whites of 2 eggs, beaten light. Mix in the order given. Add more su...
-Hot To Make Cream
Plain Bavarian Cream ¼ box gelatine.1 ¼ cup cold water. 1 pint cream. 1/3 cup sugar. 1 teaspoonful vanilla. Soak the gelatine in cold water till soft. Chill and whip the cream till you hav...
-Combinations Of Jelly, Cream, Custard, And Cake
Royal Diplomatic Pudding. (Miss Parloa.) Make lemon, orange, or wine jelly, using only two thirds of a pint of boiling water, that it may be stiff enough to mould. Strain it into a pitcher. Plac...
-How To Make Ice-Cream And Sherbet
A good ice-cream freezer should be in evey kitchen; for with it a great variety of wholesome and attractive dishes may be prepared with very little expenditure of time and strength. Fruit, cream, and ...
-How To Make Ice-Cream
Ice-Cream, No. 1 (Philadelphia Ice-Cream) 2 quarts cream; if thick, add 1 pint milk. 2 cups sugar. 2 tablespoonfuls vanilla. This is the simplest, and to many the most delicious, form of i...
-How To Make Ice-Cream. Part 2
Chocolate Ice-Cream Melt two bars of sweetened vanilla chocolate with one or two tablespoonfuls of water; add a little cream or custard, and when smooth stir it into the remainder of the custard. A...
-How To Make Ice-Cream. Part 3
Ice-Cream With Condensed Milk Mix one can of condensed milk with three pints of scalded milk, and use in making a rich custard, as directed in rule No. 2. Flavor highly, and add a pound of candied ...
-How To Make Frozen Pudding. (E. E. Squire.)
1 quart milk. 1 hpd. tbsp. arrowroot. 2 cups sugar. ½ level tsp. salt. 3 cups cream. 4 eggs, whites. 1 tbsp. vanilla. ½ lb. French fruit. 2 oz. pistachio nuts. Color and flavor...
-How To Make Sherbets, Or Water Ices
Sherbets, or water ices, are made with the juice of fruit, water, and sugar. With a supply of canned fruit, or fruit syrup always at hand, a variety of delicious desserts may be quickly prepared. A ta...
-General Directions For Making Cake
Study first the directions given under Measuring, Mixing, and Baking. Cake is a mixture of part or all of the following materials: eggs, sugar or molasses, flour, butter or cream, milk or water, fr...
-Sutter Cake Mixtures
Warm the bowl with hot water, then wipe dry. Put in the butter, and rub with a wooden or silver spoon until light and creamy. Be careful not to have the bowl so hot as to melt the butter. Add the suga...
-How To Make Sponge Cake
Sponge Cake Mixtures Beat the yolks until light or lemon-colored and thick. Add the sugar gradually, and beat again. Add the lemon juice or flavoring, and water, if that is to be used. Beat the whi...
-How To Make Cake
Roll Jelly Cake This is the simplest form of a butter cake. It is like a sponge cake, with the addition of a small amount of shortening. Three eggs, beaten separately till very light, then beaten t...
-How To Make Cake. Part 2
Macdonald Cake. (Mrs. A. A. Lincoln.) 1 cup butter, creamed. 1½ cup sugar. 1 eggs (yolks) 1 teaspoonful lemon or vanilla. ½ cup milk. ½ cup cornstarch. 1½ cup pastry flour. 1 t...
-How To Make Cake. Part 3
Cheese Cakes Line little patty pans with pastry, puff paste, or that which is quite rich. Make a cake after the recipe for Park Street cake, put a dessert spoonful of the cake batter on the paste, ...
-How To Make Cake. Part 4
Walnut Wafers Cream one-fourth of a cup (two ounces) of butter gradually, add half a cup of powdered sugar, and almost drop by drop four tablespoonfuls of milk. Next mix in a scant cupful of bread ...
-How To Make Cake. Part 5
Pink Coloring For Cake And Creams ½ ounce cochineal. ½ ounce alum. ½ ounce cream of tartar. ½ ounce salts of tartar. ½ pint boiling water. ½ pound sugar. To the first three ingredients ...
-How To Make Wedding Cake
1 pound butter. 1 pound sugar. 12 eggs. 1 pound flour. 2 teaspoonfuls each of cinnamon and mace. 1 teaspoonful each of nutmeg and allspice. ½ teaspoonful cloves. 2 pounds raisins. 2 pounds cu...
-How To Make Orange Cake
2 eggs. 1 cup sugar. 1 tablesp. melted butter. ½ cup milk. 1½ cup flour. ½ teaspoonful soda and 1 teaspoonful cream of tartar, or .3 level teasp. baking-powder. 1 tablespoonful orange j...
-How To Make Frosting
Plain Frostings White of one egg, one teaspoonful of lemon juice, and one scant cup of powdered sugar. Put the egg and lemon juice in a bowl, and stir the sugar in gradually. Then beat, not stir, a...
-How To Make Cookies
Plain Cookies. ½ cup butter. 1 cup sugar. ¼ cup milk. 1 egg. 3 level teasp. baking-powder. Flour to roll out thin. Fig. 50. Cookies. Richer Cookies ½ cup butter. 1 cup sugar. 1 ta...
-How To Make Eclairs
Bake the Cream Cake mixture in pieces four inches long and one and a half wide. When cool, split and fill with cream. Ice with chocolate or vanilla frosting. Cream For Cream Cakes And Eclairs 1 ...
-How To Make Kisses, Or Cream Meringues
Beat the whites of three eggs stiff and flaky; add three quarters of a cup of powdered sugar, sifting and cutting it in lightly. Drop by spoonfuls on paper placed on boards. Put in the hot closet or o...
-How To Make Gingerbread
Thin Sugar Gingerbread Add to the preceding receipt two teaspoonfuls of yellow ginger, instead of spice, and spread the mixture thin on a tin sheet. Mark in squares or oblongs, and bake. Sponge ...
-Fruits
It would be a great saving of time and work, give a pleasing variety to bills of fare, and be above all a great promoter of health, if people would use ripe fruit abundantly in its season at their tab...
-Stewed And Baked Fruits
The simplest forms of cooking fruit are stewing and baking. Only a small amount of sugar is needed, and it is not well to prepare a large quantity at a time, as stewed fruits do not keep long. In cook...
-How To Make Fruit Jellies
Jellies are made of equal parts of clear fruit juice and sugar. Apples, currants, quinces, grapes, and barberries are the fruits usually used. Low blackberries and swamp huckleberries make delicious j...
-How To Preserve Fruit
Marmalade This is made of the pulp of fruits with the juice, unless that has been used for jelly. When fruit is not abundant, it is well to make marmalade at the same time with jellies, especially ...
-How To Make Jams
Jams are made with whole small fruits, or large fruit cut fine, and cooked in an equal weight of sugar. Grape Jam Wash the grapes, and squeeze or pinch the pulp from the skins. Boil the pulp unt...
-How To Can Fruit
Canning differs from preserving in that the fruit is kept, either with or without sugar, by sealing in air-tight jars or cans, and is not cooked long enough to destroy its natural flavor. Some authori...
-How To Make Sweet Pickles
Eight pounds of fruit, four pounds of best brown sugar, one quart of vinegar, and one cup of mixed whole spices, - stick cinnamon, cassia buds, allspice, and cloves; less of the latter than of the for...
-How To Make Sweet Pickles. Continued
Pickled Cucumbers. (Miss Harriott Ward.) To one hundred and fifty small-sized cucumbers take one pint of salt, dissolved in boiling water to cover them. Let them remain in a covered vessel for fort...
-General Hints On Caring And Cooking For Invalids
Ventilation The first condition of comfort and recovery to the patient is that the room be perfectly ventilated, either directly or from fresh air in an adjoining room. * A sunny exposure and an op...
-How To Feed A Patient
When feeding the patient, do it gently and neatly. Anticipate his wants, and let the food be a surprise as far as practicable. In severe sickness give nourishment in a small quantity often, and never ...
-Diet For The Invalid
First Condition Sometimes the system from overtaxation, either mental or physical, needs a period of complete rest or comparative inaction; or, as in the commencement of many forms of sickness, the...
-Diet For The Invalid. Part 2
Oatmeal Gruel 2 tablespoonfuls oatmeal. ¼ teaspoonful salt. 1 quart boiling water. Boil one hour. Strain, and serve with milk or cream. No. 2. - Pound half a cup of coarse oatmeal until it...
-Diet For The Invalid. Part 3
Indian Meal Mush 1 cup corn meal. ½ teaspoonful salt. 1 cup cold milk. 1 pint boiling water. Mix the meal and salt with the cold milk. Stir this gradually into the boiling water. Cook half...
-Diet For The Invalid. Part 4
Mutton Broth To make it quickly for an invalid, chop one pound of lean juicy mutton very fine; pour over it one pint of cold water. Let it stand until the water is very red, then heat it slowly. Le...
-Diet For The Invalid. Part 5
Beef Jelly Or Broth Prepare the same as for Bouillon (page 131). If intended for jelly, clear it as directed for Clear Soup. Barley Water 1 tablespoonful pearl barley. 3 blocks sugar. ½ le...
-How To Make Herb Teas
Pour one cup of boiling water over one tablespoonful of the herbs. Cover the bowl, set it over the teakettle, and steep ten minutes. Sweeten if desired. Mullein tea is good for inflammation of the lun...
-How To Make Beef Essence And Beef Tea
Beef essence is the pure juice of the meat. This is given where a patient needs much nourishment in a small compass. Beef tea is the juice of the meat diluted with water. It is a mistake to think that...
-How To Make Beef Essence And Beef Tea. Continued
Stewed Beef Essence Cut half a pound of round steak into small pieces, season with one saltspoonful of salt, press it with a pestle or potato-masher, and let it stand in a covered bowl half an hour...
-Dishes For Convalescence
When the crisis of disease is past, the system needs gradual but complete nutrition, and the appetite is clamorous, fickle, or perhaps altogether wanting. Then is the time most critical for the patien...
-Broiling For The Invalid (Broiled Steak Or Venison)
Wipe with a clean wet cloth. Grease the gridiron with a bit of the fat. Broil over a clear fire, turning as often as you can count ten. Cook four minutes if the steak be about one inch thick; not long...
-Diet For Infants And Young Children
Let very young children have mother's milk above everything else; but if this be impossible, dissolve one ounce of sugar of milk or loaf sugar in three fourths of a pint of boiling water, and mix, as ...
-Prepared Flour (For Infants)
Tie one pint of flour in a stout cloth, put it into boiling water, and let it boil three hours. Turn out the flour ball, and scrape off the gluten which will be found in a mass on the outside of the b...
-Hints On Diet For Invalids
Vanilla should not be used as a flavoring in food for sick people. It is medicinal; and all medicines are more or less poisonous, and are not to be taken as food. Pepper is allowable when a slight ...
-Miscellaneous Hints
How To Chop Suet Cut into small pieces and remove the membrane. Sprinkle with flour, and chop in a cold place to prevent its becoming soft and sticky. How To Clean Currants Put them in a squa...
-Miscellaneous Hints. Continued
Corned Meat Fresh meat may be kept some time by corning it slightly. Wipe carefully, and remove any parts that are not sweet and fresh, then rub all over thickly with salt. Or make a brine with roc...
-How To Mould Ice Cream
Ice cream is more attractive, when served, if moulded, and if one has no fancy moulds, the freezer can will always give the round shape. If moulds are used, the cream should be packed into them closel...
-The Dining-Room
The subjects of The Arrangement of the Table,' Dinner-Giving, and Bills of Fare have been fully treated in other cook books, and it would be difficult to add to what has already been said. Hin...
-The Care Of Kitchen Utensils
A complete list of kitchen utensils is not given in this work, as the variety and number needed will be largely determined by circumstances. There are several utensils, which are not perhaps in genera...
-The Care Of Kitchen Utensils. Continued
Cremation is the most satisfactory way of disposing of kitchen refuse, both as a matter of convenience and for sanitary reasons. But if there must be other disposition made of it, keep two pails and u...
-An Outline Of Study For Teachers. Food: Its Uses, Classification, And Proportion
Webster defines food as anything that supports and nourishes life. The kingdom of nature is divided into organic and inorganic bodies. Organic bodies have life; inorganic bodies are without life....
-An Outline Of Study For Teachers. Continued
Motion Our bodies are constantly in motion. The heart and lungs move with every breath. Every thought causes some change in the brain. Whenever any part of the body loses its power of motion, it di...
-The Composition Of The Human Body
Our bodies are made up of different materials: skin, flesh, blood, bone, etc. These consist of a large number of substances, called compounds; the compounds contain two, three, or four elements, unite...
-Non-Combustible Compounds
Water And Salts Water forms more than two thirds of the whole body. It is especially abundant in the blood and secretions. It gives them the necessary fluidity, and enables them to dissolve the imp...
-Combustible Compounds. Carbonaceous Foods
The first division of combustible compounds is called carbonaceous because they all contain carbon; or heat-producing, because by their burning they generate heat. They consist of starch, sugar, fats ...
-Combustible Compounds. Carbonaceous Foods. Part 2
Sugar Sugar is composed of oxygen, hydrogen, and carbon. There are three kinds, - cane sugar, or sucrose; grape sugar, or glucose; milk sugar, or lactose. Cane sugar as an article of food closel...
-Combustible Compounds. Carbonaceous Foods. Part 3
Gum, Mucilage, Pectose, And Cellulose These are combustible compounds, but are neither starchy, saccharine, nor oily. Gum is found in apple and plum trees. Gum arabic is from a species of acacia, a...
-Nitrogenous Foods
The second division of the Combustible Compounds is called nitrogenous, or flesh-forming foods. Nitrogen is the flesh-forming element common to all foods. It enters largely into the composition of the...
-Nitrogenous Foods. Continued
Milk Milk consists of three distinct substances, which separate from one another after standing awhile, - the cream, curd, and whey. The cream is the carbonaceous part, and forms ten or twelve p...
-Condiments
There is another class of foods, called condiments, which should not pass unnoticed. Food that tastes good is digested more readily, and assimilated more perfectly, so that we really derive more ...
-Proper Proportion Of Food
These different kinds of food, water, salts, sugar, starch, fat, and albumen, must be combined in our diet; for a simple substance which fulfils only one of the purposes required in our food will not ...
-Adaptation Of Food To Climate, Age, Occupation, And State Of Health
In examining the foods adopted by different nations and classes of people, we find that many choose instinctively the kind best adapted to their individual needs. The climate, occupation, and water in...
-Adaptation Of Food To Climate, Age, Occupation, And State Of Health. Continued
State Of Health In selecting food with reference to health it must be remembered that there are certain general rules which have been established by the best authorities through many ages and in a ...
-Nourishing And Stimulating Food
There is another classification of food which it is well to consider briefly. In its effect upon the system food is nourishing and stimulating, or the reverse. Nourishing foods are those which serv...
-Digestion
In studying digestion, it is well to keep in mind the twofold division of food into nitrogenous, or flesh-forming, and carbonaceous, or heat-producing, elements. The process of digestion differs with ...
-Absorption Of Nutrients
The nutritive and perfectly digested portions of food are absorbed partly by the veins of the stomach, entering at once into the circulation, and partly by the intestines. The lining membrane of the i...
-Nutrition
Albumen is the basis of all animal nutrition. This is seen in the bird's egg during incubation. Under the influence of warmth and oxygen, all the tissues, membranes, and bones are developed from albu...
-Life And Motion. Circulation Of Water
As a plant grows, water from the soil or air unites chemically with carbon, and forms the woody fibre of the stem, the sugar of the sap, and the starch of the seed. When the plant dies, the water is a...
-Circulation Of Carbon
Vegetables, which are largely starch and carbon, absorb carbonic-acid gas from the atmosphere, which contains thirty-three grains of carbon in every square inch. If the world were all dry land, and co...
-Circulation Of Nitrogen
Gluten and fibrine are distinguished from starch and fat by containing nitrogen. The nitrogen forms four fifths of the air. It exists also in ammonia, and in aqua fortis, or nitric acid. These two com...
-Circulation Of Mineral Matter
Everything which the animal body contains is derived, directly or indirectly, from vegetable foods; and the mineral or ash it leaves, when burned, must have come from the soil through the plant. When ...
-Recapitulation
The Plant takes in, water, by its roots; carbonic acid, by its leaves; nitrogen, in the form of ammonia and nitric acid; minerals, in the form of phosphoric acid, lime, common and other salts, from th...
-Additional Recipes
Reception Chocolate 2 qts. milk. 1 lb. cocoa powder. 3 rounded tbsp. white sugar. 1 pt. cream. 2 eggs. 3 tsp. vanilla extract. Bring milk to boil, work the cocoa in a little of th...
-Additional Recipes. Continued
Cheese Canapes Allow the beaten white of one egg to each cup of finely crumbled or grated cheese, a speck of salt and cayenne. Remove the crust from inch-thick slices of bread, hollow out centre ma...
-How To Cook Quail And Squbs
Baked Quail Pick, draw, and wipe the birds outside and inside with a wet cloth. Be careful to remove any shot in the flesh. Cut the wings and neck off close to the body, but leave the feet on. Take...
-How To Cook Meat Chops
Veal Chops These are cut from the loin and ribs, and correspond to the sirloin and rib steaks in beef, and to the chops in mutton. They are generally more tender than the cutlets from the leg, just...
-Roast Mallard Or Teal Ducks
Singe, draw, and remove all the tiny pinfeathers. Then wash very quickly, both inside and out, with cool water and wipe perfectly dry. For the stuffing, take equal parts of chopped tart apples, of bre...
-Rabbit Fricassee With Curry
Select a fat, young, wild rabbit, which, if fresh, will have no unpleasant odor. Skin and clean it, and remove the head and neck, which are not to be used. Split it down the back, then disjoint it, or...
-How To Make Noodles
Beat two eggs slightly, add two tablespoon-fids of milk, and half a teaspoonful of salt. Stir in flour enough to make a very stiff dough. Knead it till stiff as possible. Roll it out into rectangular ...
-How To Make Quick Rolls
Dissolve three yeast cakes in one cup of water, add one pint of milk scalded and cooled, one tea-spoonful of salt, one tablespoonful of butter, and two teaspoonfuls of sugar. Stir in flour enough to m...
-How To Cook Shoulder Of Mutton
Remove the shoulder blade, back, and leg bones, any fine crumbs of bone or stringy membranes. Wipe with a wet cloth and rub slightly with salt. Roll or fold into shape and tie securely. Put it into bo...
-How To Cook Beef A La Russegue
Select a piece of beef from the under part of the round, or the vein, weighing about three pounds. Put it on in boiling water to nearly cover, skim as it boils, and let it cook slowly three or four ho...
-How To Make New-Fish Balls
1 cup raw salt fish. 1 pint potatoes. 1 teasp. butter. ¼ teasp. pepper. Salt if needed. Whites of 2 eggs. Wash the fish, pick in half-inch pieces, and free from bones. Pare the potatoes and cut ...
-How To Cook Bacon
Do not buy bacon by the pound, nor have it cut in thick slices, if cut at the market, but purchase it by the whole strip, freshly cured. It will keep well if the paper and burlap cover are replaced wh...
-How To Make Lobster Newberg
Remove the meat from a large lobster and cut it into half-inch pieces. Have ready the yolks of four eggs beaten with one pint of rich cream. Put two heaped tablespoons of butter into a hot chafing-dis...
-How To Make Oyster Cocktail
Use very small oysters, and allow from four to eight for each glass. Keep them on ice until wanted, and have the glasses thoroughly chilled before filling. Use the common claret glass if you have not ...
-How To Make Caviare
This is the roe of the sturgeon preserved in salt alone or in salt, pepper, and onions and left to ferment. The best caviare comes from the north of Europe; that made on the Volga, called caviare of A...
-On The Chafing-Dish
Scrambled Eggs Spread four slices of hot toast with a thin layer of potted ham. Beat four eggs slightly with a fork, season with salt and pepper, add half a cupful of milk. Turn into a hot buttered...
-On The Chafing-Dish. Part 2
Curry Of Scallops Put one teaspoonful of butter in the chafing-dish, and when melted add one tablespoonful of minced onion. After this is browned, stir in one tea-spoonful of curry powder. Cook for...
-On The Chafing-Dish. Part 3
Panocha. M. E. Johnston.) 4 cups brown sugar. 1 tsp. salt. 1 tbsp. butter. 2 tbsp. vanilla. 1 cup milk. 2 cups chopped walnuts. Boil the sugar, butter, salt, and milk until it drops har...
-On The Chafing-Dish. Part 4
Fried Squash Cut young tender squash in half-inch slices, dip in flour seasoned with salt and pepper. Cook slowly in hot butter or salt pork fat, until browned. Italian Chestnuts. (Lia Rand.) ...
-On The Chafing-Dish. Part 5
A Rice Course For A Green-And-White Luncheon Put one cup of rice and one cup and a half of boiling water in a small tightly covered stewpan over the fire, and let it boil rapidly without raising th...
-How To Cook Radishes
The small, smooth, round, or slightly oval red radishes are generally preferred, although occasionally we find the long pointed varieties both red and white. The red skin is sometimes nearly removed b...
-How To Cook Welsh Rarebit
Welsh Rarebit, With Ale Put into the blazer over hot-water pan, one tablespoon of butter, a little salt, a few grains of cayenne, and mustard, if liked, and one-half pound of rich cream cheese crum...
-How To Cook String Beans, German Style
1 qt. butter beaus. 1 hpd. tbsp. butter. 1 saltsp. pepper. 1 saltsp. nutmeg. 1 tsp. salt. Break off the ends and strings, and if the latter do not come off readily, take a thin sharp paring knif...
-How To Make Sandwiches
Sorrento Sandwiches Boil the liver from a pair of chickens until very tender, rub through a strainer, and mix it with an equal amount of olives chopped very fine. Moisten with mayonnaise dressing, ...
-How To Make Sandwiches. Continued
Cherry Sandwiches Chop candied cherries fine, and moisten slightly with orange juice, or maraschino. Spread them on rounds of thin, lightly buttered bread, cover with another round, and serve on a ...
-How To Make A Quick Dessert
When an emergency arises where a dessert must be prepared quickly, open a can of peaches, apricots, raspberries, or any available fruit. Put it in a rather large kettle with a close-fitting cover. Whi...
-How To Make A Quick Dessert. Part 2
Cherry Roly Poly Into one pint of flour mix one-half teaspoon of salt and three level teaspoons of baking-powder; rub in one tablespoon of butter and mix with milk into a stiff dough. Toss out on a...
-How To Make A Quick Dessert. Part 3
Apricot Pudding ½ lb. dried apricots. ½ lb. sugar. ¼ lb. fine white hominy. Wash the apricots in cold and then in hot water. Put them and the hominy in a scant quart of cold water and soak al...
-How To Make A Quick Dessert. Part 4
Coffee Cream With Junket Warm one pint of milk to blood heat. Dissolve in it one tablespoon of sugar and a saltspoon of salt. Flavor with one teaspoon of coffee extract or one tablespoon of black o...
-How To Make A Quick Dessert. Part 5
Bos-Well Cake. (Mrs. Gould.) 3 cups butter. 6 cups sugar. 8 eggs. 3 cups milk. 10 cups flour. 2 lbs. raisins. 1 nutmeg. 1 teasp. mace. 1 teasp. soda. 1 wine-glass St. Croix rum. Pick over and...
-How To Make A Quick Dessert. Part 6
Pistachio Cream Cake ½ cup butter. 2 cups sugar, scant. 1 cup milk. Whites of 3 eggs. 2¾ cups flour. 2 tsps. baking-powder. ½ tsp. almond. Cream the butter, add the sugar, milk, eggs be...
-How To Make A Quick Dessert. Part 7
Wild Unripe Grape Sauce Wash the grapes and remove the stems. Cut through the middle with a sharp knife and remove the seeds. Then weigh the fruit and allow an equal weight of sugar. Put the cut fr...
-How To Make Marshmallow Cake
½ cup butter. ½ cup sugar. ½ cup milk. 1 teaspoon vanilla. ½ cup cornstarch. ½ cup pastry flour. 3 level teaspoons baking-powder. ½ teaspoon cream of tartar. Whites of 6 eggs. Mix the star...
-Grandmother's Pound Cake
For many years I tried in vain to make a pound cake that would have the soft, velvety texture which I remembered in that eaten at the table of a dear friend in my girlhood. The recipes which I tried m...
-How To Make Fruit Mousse
Sprinkle strawberries or raspberries with sugar, and let them stand until the sugar is dissolved and the juice drawn out. Use enough berries to make a pint of juice. Mash them and strain through fine ...
-How To Make Cafe Parfait
Cafe Parfait, No. 1 Mix half a cup of strong clear coffee with one pint of medium cream. Sweeten to taste and stir until the sugar is dissolved. Place the bowl of cream in a pan of ice. When the cr...
-How To Make White Mountain Cake
The distinguishing feature of this cake is that it has a soft frosting, or cream, instead of jelly, between the layers. This cream is sometimes flavored and enriched with chopped nuts, or fruits. The ...
-How To Make Fruit Sauce
Claret Sauce Boil one cup of sugar with one-fourth of a cup of water; when slightly thickened, cool and add one-half of a cup of claret. Stewed Green Apple Sauce The first green apples that a...
-How To Make Frappe
Frappe is a term given to water ices which have been only partly frozen; that is, to the consistency of mush, rather than hard enough to mould. It is really an iced drink, therefore the name should no...
-Preserved Strawberries
Select the choicest berries and lay aside not necessarily very large ones, but perfect, firm, and of even size they must be. Press the remainder of the fruit for juice, taking only what drips easily. ...
-Preserved Citron
Cut the citron melon in halves each way, then cut each quarter in three quarter-inch slices from the stem and blossom ends to the middle. In this way you cut across the seeds, and they can be more eas...
-How To Preserve Mangoes
These are made from small, green water or muskmelons, green tomatoes, peppers, peaches, large cucumbers, or any fruit from which the seeds, stone, or inside portion can be removed, the cavity tilled w...
-Explanation Of Terms Used In Cookery
Abatis Giblets. Agneau Lamb. Ala, au, aux With; as huitres aux champignons, oysters with mushrooms. Dressed in a certain style; as Smelts a la Tartare, with Tartare sauce. A VAurore ...
-Explanation Of Terms Used In Cookery. Part 2
Cochineal Coloring matter made from the dried bodies of insects found in Mexico, where they feed on a species of the cactus. Cock-a-leekie A soup used in Wales, made from fowls and leeks. ...
-Explanation Of Terms Used In Cookery. Part 3
Manna Kroup A flour made from wheat and rice, sometimes mixed with saffron and yolk of egg. Maraschino A kind of brandy. Marinade A pickle for boiling meat or fish in. Marinate To...
-Other Publications By The Author
Carving And Serving By Mrs. MARY J. LINCOLN, AUTHOR OF THE BOSTON COOK BOOK. Square 12mo. Illuminated board covers. Price, 60 cents. Carving and Serving, by Mrs. D. A. Lincoln, author of ...
-Other Publications By The Author. Part 2
Boston School Kitchen Text-Book Lessons In Cooking, For The Use Of Classes In Public And Industrial Schools By MRS. MARY J. LINCOLN AUTHOR OF THE BOSTON COOK BOOK One Volume. 12mo. Price, $...
-Other Publications By The Author. Part 3
Mrs. Lincoln's Boston Cook-Book. What To Do And What Not To Do In Cooking By MRS. MARY J. LINCOLN, FIRST PRINCIPAL OF THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL NEW REVISED EDITION, including 250 additiona...







TOP
previous page: The Blue Grass Cook Book | by Minnie C. Fox
  
page up: Cook Books and Recipes
  
next page: Lessons In Cookery | by Thomas K. Chambers