The following Engraving represents the method of dividing an Ox for the table, in England, and in most of the southern cities of the United States. The method in Boston varies considerably, dividing into smaller pieces, and this plan we pursue in the following tables; but the manner of cooking each is nearly the same.

The method of dividing an Ox for the table, in England

1. Sirloin.

2. Rump.

3. Edge Bone.

4. Buttock.

5. Mouse Buttock.

6. Veiny Piece.

7. Thick Flank.

8. Thin Flank.

9. Leg.

10. Fore rib: Five ribs,

11. Middle rib: Four ribs.

12. Chuck: Three ribs.

13. Shoulder or leg-of-mutton piece

14. Brisket.

15. Clod.

16. Neck, or Sticking Piece.

17. Shin.

18. Cheek.

Beef. The Hind Quarter

Price per lb.

Method of cooking.

Sirloin 10 to 12 cents

Roasted.

Rump 10 to 12 „

Roasted, or Steak, or Stew.

Edge Bone 6 to 8 „

Boiled.

Round 8 to 10 „

Alamode, Boiled, or savory salt-ed Beef.

Veiny Piece 6 to 8 „

Steaks or Roast; or baked or salted

Thick Flank 6 to 8 „

Steaks, or corned.

Thin Flank 6 „

do.

Leg Ran 4 „

Boil; Soup, or Stew.

Leg 2 „

Soup or Stew.

The Fore Quarter.

First Cut, 2 Ribs 10 cents

Roast.

Second Cut, 2 Ribs 10 „

do.

Third Cut, 2 Ribs 8 „

do.

Fourth Cut, 2 Ribs 6 „

do.

Chuck Rib 5 „

Boil or Stew, or for making gravy

Shoulder of Mutton Piece 5 „

Steaks or Bouilli.

Shoulder Clod 3 „

Boil or Soup, or Beef Sausages.

Brisket 6 „

Boil, or Bouilli; or stewing, or Harricot, or Salted.

Rattleran 6 „

Boil.

Sticking Piece 3 „

Boil, or Soup.

Neck 2 „

Gravy.

Shin 2 „

Soup; excellent Scotch barley Broth, Stewed.

11 tad (20 cents)

Soup, Stewed.

Tail (2 cents)

Soup, Stewed.

Heels, given with the head

Boiled, Jelly, Soup.

Mutton.

Leg 8 to 10 cents

Boil, Roast.

Loin 6 to 8 „

Chops - Roast, Boil,

Rack, neck end 5 to 6 „

Boil, Roast, Irish Stew, Harricot, Stewed, Broth.

Rack, best end 6 to 8 „

Chops, or Broth.

Shoulder 6 „

Roast.

Breast 6 „

Broth, - Grilled.

Head 4 ,

Broth.

The Chine or the Saddle, two Loins. The Haunch" is a Leg and part of the Loin,

Roasted, Venisonified.

Veal.

Loin 8 to 10 cents

Roast.

Leg , „

Cutlets, Roast, Boil.

Fillet „ „

Roasted, Veal Olives, Scotch Collops.

Knuckle, or whole Leg 8 „

Broth, Ragout, Stew, Soup.

Breast 8 to 10 „

Roast,

Breast and Neck 6 „

Roast, Stew, Ragout, Curry-

Rack 6 „

Soup - Chops to fry.

Shoulder 6 „

Roast, or Bake.

Brisket 8 „

Stewed, Ragout.

Cutlets 10 „

Fried, Broiled.

Head, scalded, (50 to 60 cts. each}

Broiled plain, Hash.

Beef is plentiest and cheapest from October to January; and best from January to May.

Veal is best from, April to July.

Mutton is best from October to June.

Grass Lamb is best from June to October.

The Quality of Butcher Meat varies quite as much as the price of it - according to its age - how it has been fed - and especially how it has been treated the week before it has been killed.

Pork

Comes into Market.

Plentiest.

Roasting Pigs

May

June.

Quarter Pork

July

August.

Spare Ribs and Chine

Aug.

Nov. & Dec.

Middlings

salt, all the year.

Bacon Hams

November, and continue all the year.

Poultry

Poultry is in greatest perfection, when in greatest plenty.

The price of it varies as much as the size and quality of it, and the supply at market, and the demand for it.

It is generally dearest from March to July, and cheapest about Sep-lember, when the Game season commences, and the weather being colder, allows of its being brought from more distant parts.

Poultry.

Comes into Market.

Plentiest.

Chickens

July

Nov.

Fowls

All the year

do.

Ducks

July

October.

Geese

August

Nov.

Turkeys

September

Nov. & Dec.

Wild Ducks

do.

Oct. &. Apr.

Brants

April

May.

Partridges

September

October.

Quails

do.

January.

Woodcocks

July

August.

The above information will, we trust, he very acceptable to Economical Families, who, from hearing the very high price Poultry sometimes costs, are deterred from ever inquiring about it. In the cheap seasons we have noted, it is sometimes as cheap as Butcher-meat.

Those who pay the highest, do not always pay the dearest, price. In fact, the Best Meat is the cheapest; and those who treat a tradesman liberally, have a much better chance of being well served, than those who are forever bargaining for the Market Penny. In dividing the Joints, there is always an opportunity of apportioning the Bones, Fat, Flaps, etc. so as to make up a variation of much more than a penny per pound in most pieces; and a Butcher will be happy to give the turn of his knife in favor of that Customer who cheerfully pays the fair price of the article he purchases; have those who are unwilling to do so any reason to complain? Have they not invited such conduct.