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The Cook's Own Book, And Housekeeper's Register | by N. K. M Lee



Being receipts for cooking of every kind of meat, fish, and fowl; and making every sort of soup, gravy, pastry, preserves, and essences. With a complete system of confectionery; tables for marketing; a book of carving; and miss Leslie's seventy-five receipts for pastry, cakes, and sweetmeats.

TitleThe Cook's Own Book, And Housekeeper's Register
AuthorN. K. M Lee
PublisherC. S. Francis And Company
Year1854
Copyright1854, C. S. Francis And Company
AmazonLarousse Gastronomique

By A Boston Housekeeper

The Cook's Own Book, And Housekeeper's Register
-Preface
The cook exercises a greater power over the public health and welfare than the physician, and if he should be a charlatan in his art, alas! for his employers. Hitherto, or until of late years, the coo...
-Management Of Families
In domestic arrangement the table is entitled to no small share of attention, as a well conducted system of domestic management is the foundation of every comfort; and the respectability and welfare o...
-Cooking Utensils
The various utensils used for the preparation and keeping of food are made either of metal, glass, pottery ware, or wood; each of which is better suited to some particular purposes than the others. Me...
-Diet
That we require food, as vegetables require water, to support our existence, is the primary consideration upon which we should take it. But in our general practice of eating, it cannot be said, we ea...
-Boiling
This most simple of culinary processes is not often performed in perfection. It does not require quite so much nicety and attendance as roasting; to skim your pot well, and keep it really boiling (the...
-Baking
Baking is one of the cheapest and most convenient ways of dressing a dinner in small families; and, I may say, that the oven is often the only kitchen a poor man has, if he wishes to enjoy a joint of ...
-Roasting
Let the young cook never forget that cleanliness is the chief cardinal virtue of the kitchen; the first preparation for roasting is to take care that the spit be properly cleaned with sand and water; ...
-Frying
Frying is often a conyenient mode of cookery; it may be performed by a fire which will not do for roasting or boiling; and by the introduction of the pan between the meat and the fire, things get more...
-Broiling
Cleanliness is extremely essential in this mode of cookery. Keep your gridiron quite clean between the bars, and bright on the top: when it. is hot, wipe it well with a linen cloth: just before you u...
-Broths And Soups
The cook must pay continual attention to the condition of her stew-pans, soup-kettles, etc. which should be examined every time they are used. The prudent housewife will carefully examine the conditio...
-Broths And Soups. Continued
The art of composing a rich soup is so to proportion the several ingredients one to another, that no particular taste be stronger than the rest, but to produce such a fine harmonious relish that the w...
-Observations On Certain Articles
We shall conclude these Introductory Observations, with a few remarks on the qualities of certain Articles in common use. Spices Cayenne pepper, black pepper, and ginger, may be esteemed the best of...
-Meat Carving. Marketing Tables
The following Engraving represents the method of dividing an Ox for the table, in England, and in most of the southern cities of the United States. The method in Boston varies considerably, dividing i...
-Table Of Weights And Measures
By which persons not having scales and weights at hand may readily measure the articles wanted to form any receipt, without the trouble of weighing. Allowance to be made for any extraordinary dryness ...
-The Art Of Carving; With Hints On The Etiquette Of The Dinner Table
Without a perfect knowledge of the art of Carving, it is impossible to perform the honors of the table with propriety; and nothing can be more disagreeable to one of a sensitive disposition, than to b...
-Directions For Curing And Cooking Pickled Fish
The use of Pickled Fish, such as Mackerel, Salmon, Shad, etc. is becoming more general than formerly, and would be still more extensive if the proper mode of preparing them for the table was better un...
-How To Cook Mutton
In helping the more fleshy joints, such as a Sirloin of Beef, Leg of Mutton, Fillet of Veal, cut thin smooth slices, and let the knife pass through to the hones of Mutton and Beef. It would prevent m...
-How To Cook Beef
Aitch-Bone Of Beef Cut off and lay aside a thick slice from the entire surface, as marked 1-2, then help. There are two sorts of fat to this joint, and, as tastes differ, it is necessary to learn whi...
-How To Cook Veal
A Loin Of Veal A Loin Of Veal should be jointed previous to being sent to table, when each division may be easily cut through with a knife. The fat surrounds the kidney, and portions of each should b...
-How To Cook Pork
Hand Of Pork Cut thin slices from this delicate joint, either across near the knuckle, or from the blade bone, as directed for a shoulder of mutton. This forms a nice dish for a tete-a-tete dinner; t...
-How To Cook Poultry, Game, Etc
The carving-knife for poultry is smaller and lighter than the meat carver; the point is more peaked and the handle longer. In cutting up a Turkey, Goose, Duck, or Wild Fowl, more prime pieces may be ...
-How To Cook Hare
Insert the point of the knife inside the shoulder at 1, and divide all the way down to the rump, at 2: do the same on the other side, and you will have the hare in three pieces. Pass the knife under t...
-Almond Cheesecakes
Almond Cheesecakes. (1) Take half a pound of Jordan almonds, lay them in cold water all night; the next morning blanch them in cold water; then take them out and dry them in a clean cloth, beat them ...
-Almonds
Burnt Almond Conserve Blanch and cut six ounces of sweet almonds into small strips, lay them on paper and put them into an oven; when they are brown. Take them out, and throw them into two pounds of...
-American Gingerbread
Take half a pound of fresh butter melted, one pound and a half of dried and sifted flour, the same quantity of brown sugar, a quarter of a pound of pounded ginger, nine eggs, the yolks and whites sepa...
-American Snow Balls
Boil some rice in milk till it be swelled and soft; pare and carefully scoop out the core of five or six good-sized apples, put into each a little grated lemon-peel and cinnamon; place as much of the ...
-Anchovies
Wash half a dozen anchovies, and take the meat from the bones; cut them into four fillets, place them on a dish with some sweet herbs, cut small; and the yolks and whites of hard eggs, also cut small....
-Angelica To Candy
Cut the stalks when thick and tender, put them on in boiling water, and when very tender, drain it off, and throw them into cold water; peel off the skin, and scald them in a thin sirup, made with the...
-Apples
Cooks, in choosing apples for culinary purposes, should always be guided by the weight, the heaviest being always the best; and those are particularly to be taken, which, upon being pressed by the thu...
-Apples. Part 2
Apple Dumplings, Baked Make them in the same way, but instead of tieing them in cloths lay them in a buttered dish and bake them. Dried Or Baked Apples Always choose the clearest of baking apples, ...
-Apples. Part 3
Apple Poupeton Pare some good baking apples, take out the cores, and put them into a skillet; to a pound and a half of apples, put a quarter of a pound of sugar, and a wine glass of water. Do them ov...
-Apple Fritters
Apple Fritters (1) Beat the yolks of eight eggs, the whites of four, well together, strain them into a pan; then take a quart of cream, make it moderately hot, and add two glasses of sack, three-quar...
-Apple Marmalade
Apple Marmalade (1) Boil some pippins till they begin to get tender, then put them into cold water; pare and core them; squeeze the pulp through a sieve and put it over the fire, letting it remain ti...
-Apricots
Apricots In Brandy Weigh equal quantities of loaf sugar and of apricots; scald them, and take oft the skins. Clarify and boil the sugar, put the fruit into it, and let it remain for two or three day...
-Artichokes
Artichokes And Almonds Take half a pound of sweet almonds blanched and beat fine, with two tea spoonfuls of orange-tlower or rose water; then take a quart of cream, and boil it with a small quantity ...
-Jerusalem Artichokes
Jerusalem Artichokes (1) Are boiled and dressed in the various ways directed for potatoes. N. B - They should be covered with thick melted butter, or a nice white or brown sauce. Jerusalem Artichoke...
-Arrow-Root
Mix with two or three table-spoonfuls of arrow-root half a pint of cold water; let it stand for nearly a quarter of an hour, pour off the water, and stir in some pounded sugar: boil a pint of milk, an...
-Asparagus
Set a stew-pan with plenty of water in it on the fire; sprinkle a handful of salt in it; let it boil, and skim it; then put in your asparagus, prepared thus scrape all the stalks till they are perfect...
-Aspick
Take a knuckle of veal, a knuckle of ham, a thick slice of beef, and if they will not make your jelly stiff enough, add two calf's feet, or some swards of bacon rasped; put them into a sauce-pan with ...
-Bacon
Cover a pound of nice streaked bacon or salt pork with cold water, let it boil gently for three-quarters of an hour; take it up, scrape the under side well, and cut off the rind: grate a crust of brea...
-Bain Marie
A flat vessel, containing boiling water, meant to hold other saucepans, either for purposes of cookery or to keep dishes hot. The advantages of preserving the heat of dishes by the bain marie is this,...
-Barley Water
Take a couple of ounces of pearl barley, wash it clean with cold water, put it into half a pint of boiling water, and let it boil for five minutes; pour off this water, and add to it two quarts of boi...
-Barley Gruel
Take three ounces of pearl barley, of which make a quart of barley water; if it be not white, shift it once or twice; put in two ounces of currants clean picked and washed, and when they are plumped, ...
-Barberries
Barberry Conserve Put a pound of ripe barberries and half an ounce of powdered fennel seed into a silver vessel, with a glass of water; boil them three or four times, and press the juice through a si...
-Batter For Fish, Meat, Fritters, Etc
Prepare it with fine flour, salt, a little oil, beer, vinegar, or white wine and the whites of eggs beat up; when of a proper thickness it will drop out of the spoon about the size of a nutmeg at once...
-Beans
Cut, wash, and boil the beans, and then throw them into a cullender. Put a piece of butter into your table-dish, lay the Leans on it, and garnish them with chopped parsley laid round like a cord; heat...
-Bechamelle
Reduce some sauce tournee over a good fire, moisten with chicken broth or consomme, constantly stirring to prevent its catching; when of the proper consistence, add two glasses of boiling cream, conti...
-Bechamel Or White Sauce
Cut in square pieces, half an inch thick, two pounds of lean, veal, half a pound of lean ham; melt in a stewpan two ounces of butter; when melted, let the whole simmer until it is ready to catch at th...
-Beef
The names of the various pieces, according to the method of dividing the carcass, are as follows: - The hind quarter contains the Sirloin; Rump; Edge-bonr; Buttock, or Round; Mouse Buttock; Veiny Piec...
-Beef. Part 2
Beef Alanglaise Take a rump of beef, or any piece you like better of the same size; tie it up neatly with packthread, and put it into a stewpan with two or three carrots, a parsnip, three or four oni...
-Beef. Part 3
Cold Rump Steaks To Warm Beef Lay them in a stewpan, with one large onion cut in quarters, six berries of allspice, the same of black pepper, cover the steaks with boiling water, let them stew gently...
-Beef. Part 4
Beef Ham Rub a little common salt over a piece of beef of about twenty pounds weight; take out the bone, and in one or two days, rub well into the beef the following ingrethents, finely pounded and w...
-Beef. Part 5
Beef And Oyster Sausages Scald three-quarters of a pint of oysters in their own liquor; take them out and chop them finely; mince one pound of beef and mutton, and three-quarters of a pound of beef s...
-Beef. Part 6
Beef Rissoles Chop finely a pound of lean tender beef, and a quarter of a pound of beef suet; pound them in a marble mortar; mix with it a quarter of a pound of grated bread, a little onion, and a he...
-Beef. Part 7
Spring Garden Beef Cut a piece of lean beef into thin slices like Scotch collops, lard it thick with bacon, and put it into a pan with salt, pepper, mace, two or three bay leaves, and a bunch of swee...
-Beef Alamode
Beef Alamode (1) Take about eleven pounds of the mouse buttock, or clod of beef, or a blade-bone, or the sticking-piece, or the like weight of the breast of veal; cut it into pieces of three or four ...
-Beef Alabraise
Beef Alabraise (1) Bone a rump of beef; lard it very thickly with salt pork seasoned with pepper, salt, cloves, mace, and allspice, and season the beef with pepper and salt; put some slices of bacon ...
-Beef Bouilli
Beef Bouilli (1) In phin English, is understood to mean boiled beef; but its culinary acceptation, in the French kitchen, is fresh beef dressed without boiling, and only very gently simmered by a blo...
-Cold Beef Tenderloin
Cold Tenderloin. Beef (1) Cut off entire the inside of a large sirloin of beef, brown it all over in a stewpan, then add a quart of water, half apint of Port wine, a tea-cupful of strong beer, two ta...
-Beef Hashed
Beef Hashed (1) Take three or four onions, chop them very fine, and put them into a stewpan, with a piece of butter and a little flour; stir it over the fire till nearly done and well browned; then m...
-Beef Minced
Beef Minced (1) Take some cold roasted fillet of beef, cut out all the fat and suet, then chop the meat as fine as possible, and put it into a reduced Spanish sauce made boiling hot; when ready to se...
-Beef Rump To Stew
Beef Rump To Stew (1) Bind the beef tightly, stick in four cloves, and put it in a saucepan, with three quarts of water, a quarter of an ounce of black pepper half beaten, some salt, a bunch of sweet...
-Beef Steaks
Broiled Beef Steaks Cut the steaks off a rump or the ribs of a fore quarter; beat them well with a rolling-pin. Have the gridiron perfectly clean and heated over a clear quick fire; lay on the steaks...
-Beef Stewed
Beef Stewed (1) Stew in five quarts of water the middle part of a brisket of beef weighing ten pounds, add two onions stuck with two cloves, one head of celery, one large carrot, two turnips cut smal...
-Ginger Beer
Put into a kettle, two ounces of powdered ginger, (or more if it is not very strong,) half an ounce of cream of tartar, two large lemons cut in slices, two pounds of broken loaf-sugar, and one gallon ...
-Beer
Spruce Beer When ten gallons of water, six pounds of molasses, and three ounces of bruised ginger have boiled together for half an hour, two pounds of the outer sprigs of the spruce fir are to be add...
-Beet Root
May be either baked or boiled; it will take from an hour and a half to three hours, according to the size of the root, to cook properly. Beet Root Pickled Boil the roots tender, peel, and cut them i...
-Birds Potted. How To Preserve When They Begin To Grow Bad
When birds have come a great way they often smell so bad that they can scarcely be borne from the rankness of the butter, by managing them in the following manner they may be made as good as ever. Set...
-Biscuits
Biscuits (1) Weigh eight eggs, an equal weight of sugar, and the weight of four in flour; beat up the yolks of five, and put them in an earthen vessel with some rasped lemon-peel and the sugar, beat ...
-Biscuits. Part 2
Filbert Biscuits Take half a pound of filberts, an ounce of bitter almonds, the whites of six, and the yolks of three eggs, an ounce of flour, and half a pound of sugar; blanch and pound the filberts...
-Biscuits. Part 3
The Queen's Biscuits Take a pound and a half of flour, a pound and a half of fine sugar, the whites of twenty-four, and the yolks of eighteen eggs, put in coriander seeds beaten small at discretion; ...
-Biscuits. Part 4
Biscuits In Cases Prepare your mixture the same as for spoon biscuits, and fill some little round or square cases with it. T!en with the rolling pin crush some fine sugar, but not to a powder, an...
-Biscuits. Part 5
Millefruit Biscuits Take preserved orange and lemon-peel, a quarter of a pound of each, six ounces of angelica, the same of sweet, and one ounce of bitter almonds; entail the above ingredients into p...
-Biscuits. Part 6
Spoon Biscuits Break four eggs, put the yolks and whites into separate basins; add to the former a quarter of a pound of powder-sugar; having grated on it the zeste of a lemon, mix these together wel...
-Almond Biscuits
Almond Biscuits (1) Blanch and pound a quarter of a pound of sweet almonds, sprinkling them occasionally with fine sugar; then beat them up for a quarter of an hour with an ounce of flour, the yolks ...
-Drop Biscuits
Drop Biscuits (1) Pound and sift a pound of fine sugar, take the yolks of seven and the whites of ten eggs and beat well separately for an hour. Dry and sift a pound of fine flour, and when cold mix ...
-Potato Biscuits
Potato Biscuits (1) Beat the yolks of fifteen eggs with a pound of sifted sugar, grate the rind of a lemon on a piece of lump sugar; scrape off the yellow sugar with a knife, and having dried it well...
-Bishop
Roast four good-sized bitter oranges till they are of a pale brown color; lay them in a tureen, and put over them half a pound of pounded loaf sugar, and three glasses of claret; place the cover on th...
-Blanc
A mixture of butter, sal', water, and a slice of lemon; also as follows: - Cut a pound of beef suet, and the same of fat bacon into dice, half a pound of butter, the juice of a lemon, salt and pepper,...
-Black Cock, Moor Game, And Grouse
Are all to be dressed like partridges; the black cock will take as much as a pheasant, and moor game and grouse as the partridge. Send up with them currant-jelly and tried bread crumbs. ...
-Braising
This is a method of dressing meat, poultry, etc. etc. without its undergoing any evaporation. It is done by lining a braismg-pan with thin slices of bacon, beef, or veal, upon which place whatever you...
-Brawn
A Collar Of Brawn Wash, scrape, and clean very thoroughly a large pig's head, feet, and ears; lay them into salt and water, with a little saltpetre, for three hours. To make the collar larger, boil t...
-Bread
Bread (1) Put a quartern of flour into a large basin, with two tea-spoonfuls of salt; make a hole in the middle; then put in a basin four table-spoonfuls of good yeast; stir in a pint of milk, lukewa...
-Bread. Part 2
How To Serve With Coffee Bread Whip up the whites of ten eggs to a thick snow; add to them the yolks beaten with eight ounces of powder-sugar, place it over a charcoal fire, and whip it lor half an h...
-Bread. Part 3
Plain Short Bread The same proportions of flour and butter must be used as in the receipt for short bread; this must be mixed together, rolled out, but not made quite so thick as in the rich kind; bu...
-Common Spiced Bread
Boil three pounds of honey in a gallon of water for a quarter of an hour; then pour it on the Hour in the trough; mix them together well, until the flour will imbibe no move liquid; when a little cool...
-Brioche
Divide half a quartern of flour into three parts, and knead into one of them half an ounce of yeast and a little warm water, wrap it in a cloth and set it by, in summer time for a quarter of an hour, ...
-Broccoli
Set a pan of clean cold water on the table, and a saucepan on the fine with plenty of water, and a handful of salt in it. Broccoli is prepared by stripping off all the side shoots, leaving the top; pe...
-Broth
Barley Broth Chop a leg of beef in pieces, boil it in three gallons of water, with a carrot and a crust of bread, till reduced to half; then strain it oft and put it into the pot again with half a p...
-Broth. Continued
Mutton For The Sick Broth Have a pound and a half of a neck or loin of mutton; take off the skin and the fat, and put it into a saucepan; cover it with cold water, (it will take about a quart to a po...
-Browning
Is a convenient article to color those soups or sauces of which it is supposed their deep brown complexion denotes the strength and savouriness of the composition. Burned sugar is also a favorite ingr...
-Brussels Sprouts To Boil
Trim and wash them perfectly clean, and let them lie an horn' in cold water. Put them on in boiling water, with a little salt, and boil them till tender. Drain off the water, and serve them hot. ...
-Bubble And Squeak
Chop small some boiled white cabbage; season it with pepper and salt, and fry it with a little butter; pepper and broil some slices of cold boiled salted beef; put the fried cabbage into a dish, and l...
-Buns
Bath Buns Rub together, with the hand, one pound of fine flour and a half a pound of butter; beat six eggs, and add them to the flour with a table spoonful of good yeast. Mix them all together with h...
-Burdwan Stew
Cut into joints a cold fowl or duck, put it into a stewpan, with half a pint of gravy, a large wine-glass of ale, half a one of white wine, the juice of half a lemon, a tea-spoonful of soy and Cayenne...
-Butter
Burnt Butter Put two ounces of fresh butter into a small frying-pan; when it becomes a dark brown color, add to it a table-spoonful and a half of good vinegar, and a little pepper and salt. Observati...
-Melted Butter
Melted Butter (1) Dust a little flour over a quarter of a pound of butter, put it into a saucepan, with about a wine-glass of water; stir it one way constantly till it be melted, and let it just boil...
-Cabbage
How To Stew Cabbage Wash a cabbage well, slice it as for pickling, and put it into a stewpan, with half a tea-cupful of Port wine, and a bit of butter kneaded in flour, a little salt and pepper; stir...
-Cakes
Preparatory remarks. The currants and raisins should be prepared as directed under the article headed, Puddings and Pies, and the flour dried before the fire on a large sheet of white paper, then sift...
-Cakes. Part 2
Apple Cake Pare and core a d en apples, and make them into marmalade, with the zeste of a lemon and a little cinnamon, and pass them through a bolting; put them into a stewpan, with a spoonful of pot...
-Cakes. Part 3
Baba Cake Take the fourth part of two pounds of flour, lay it on your pasteboard or slab, and having made a hole in the middle of it, put in half an ounce of yeast, work it up with one hand, whilst w...
-Cakes. Part 4
Brie Cake Take some rich cheese, knead it with a pint and half of flour, three quarters of a pound of butter, and a little salt; moisten it with five or six eggs beaten up; when it is well kneaded, l...
-Cakes. Part 5
Curd Cakes Take a quart of curds, eight eggs, leaving out four whites; put in sugar, grated nutmeg, and a little flour; mix these well togetner, heat butter, in a frying-pan, drop them in, and fry li...
-Cakes. Part 6
Rich Gingerbread Cakes To one pound of dried and sifted flour, allow half a pound of pounded loaf sugar, three-quarters of a pound of fresh butter washed in rose water, one pound of treacle, one nutm...
-Cakes. Part 7
Little Cakes To a pound of flour dried, add a pound of lump sugar rolled very tine, the peel of two lemons chopped small, and five ounces of butter; mix them thoroughly; let it stand sometime before ...
-Cakes. Part 8
Plum Cake Three pounds of flour, three pounds of currants, three-quarters of a pound of almonds, blanched and beat grossly, about half an ounce of them bitter, four ounces of sugar, seven yolks and s...
-Cakes. Part 9
Shrewsbury Cakes Take a pound of butter, and put it in a little flat pan, rub it till it is as fine as cream, then take one pound of powdered sugar, a little cinnamon and mace pounded, and four eggs,...
-Cakes. Part 10
White Cake Take of dried and sifted flour,of fresh butter and of finely-pounded loaf sugar, one pound each; five well-beaten eggs, a quarter of a pint of cream, of candied orange and lemon peel, cut ...
-Almond Cakes
Almond Cake Blanch half a pound of sweet, and three ounces of bitter almonds; pound them to a paste in a mortar with orange-flower water; add half a pound of sifted loaf sugar, and a little brandy; w...
-Caraway Cakes
Caraway Cakes (1) Three quarters of a pound of flour, half a pound of butter well rubbed into it, a quarter of a pound of sifted loaf sugar, and some caraway seeds; make these into a stiff paste with...
-Currant Cakes
Currant Cakes (1) Take two pounds of fine flour, one pound and a half of butter, the yolks of five or six eggs, one pound and a half of sugar, six spoonfuls of white wine, three spoonfuls of caraway ...
-Common Cake
Common Cake (1) Take two quarts of flour, mix with it three-quarters of a pound of butter, a tea-cupful of fresh yeast, one pint of milk, nine well-beaten eggs two pounds of well-cleaned currant.-, o...
-Potato Cheese Cakes
Potato Cheese. Cakes (1) Boil and peel half a pound of good potatoes, bruise them in a mortar, and when nearly cold drop in the yolk and white of an egg at intervals, until four have been added, beat...
-Rice Cake
Rice Cake (1) Whisk ten eggs for half an hour, add to them half a pound of flour of rice, half a pound of pounded and sifted loaf sugar, and the grated peel of two lemons; mix this into half a pound ...
-Calf's Brains
Calf's Brains With Oysters Blanch and clean the brains, then wipe them dry, dip them into yolks of eggs, and roll them in bread crumbs; fry them in boiling lard till of a good color, drain them very ...
-Calf's Chitterlings, Heart
Calf's Chitterlings Cut them open with scissors, wash and cleanse them thoroughly, lay them for a night into salt-and-water, then wash them well, parboil and cut them into small pieces, dip them in t...
-Calf's Feet
Potted Calf's Feet Boil the feet as for jelly, pick all the meat from the bones, add to it half a pint of gravy, a little salt, pepper, and nutmeg, garlic, a shallot and some shred ham; simmer it for...
-Calf's Head
Hashed Calf's Head Boil the head almost enough, and take the meat of the best side neatly from the bone, and lay it in a small dish; wash it over with the yolks of two eggs, and cover it with crumbs,...
-Calf's Liver
Broiled Calf Liver Slice it, season with pepper and salt, and broil nicely: rub a bit of cold butter on it, and serve hot and hot. Larded And Roasted Calf's Liver Lard a fine calf's liver the same ...
-Capillaire
Take fourteen pounds of sugar, three pounds of coarse sugar, six eggs beat in with the shells, three quarts of water; boil it up twice; skim it well, then add to it a quarter of a pint of orange-flowe...
-Capilotade Italian
Cut up a cold roast fowl; then take a good slice of butter, and some shred mushrooms and potherbs; fry these till they are about to turn brown, with a tea-spoonful of flour; then add to them a large g...
-Capons Or Fowls
Must be killed a couple of days in moderate, and more in cold weather, before they are dressed, or they will eat tough: a good criterion of the ripeness of poultry for the spit, is the ease with which...
-How To Pickle Capsicums
Gather the pods, with the stalks on, before they turn red; cut a slit down the side with a penknife, and take out all the seeds, but as little of the meat as possible; lay them in a strong brine for t...
-Cardoons
Cardoons, With Cheese String and cut them an inch long, put them into a saucepan with red wine, seasoned with pepper and salt, stew them till they are tender, put in a piece of butter rolled in flour...
-Carrots
Let them be well washed and brushed, not scraped. An hour is enough for young spring carrots; grown carrots must be cut in half, and will take from an hour and a half to two hours and a half. When don...
-Caramel Or Boiled Sugar
Break into a small copper or brass pan, one pound of refined sugar, - put in a gill of spring water; - set it on a fire, and when it boils, skim it quite clean, and let it boil quick, till it comes to...
-Carp
Carp, Boiled Scale and clean a brace of carp, reserving the liver and roe; take half a pint of vinegar, or a quart of sharp cider, add as much water as will cover the fish, a piece of horse-radish, a...
-Cassile
Mix two table-spoonfuls of potato-flour with two or three of cream or good milk; boil for a few minutes with a quart of cream or milk, the peel of a lemon and a bit of cinnamon; suir it with the flour...
-Cauliflower
Choose those that are close and white, and of the middle size; trim off the outside leaves; cut the stalk off flat at the bottom; let them lie in salt and water an hour before you boil them. Put them ...
-Caudle
Caudle (1) Boil up half a pint of fine gruel, with a bit of butter the size of a large nutmeg, a large spoonful of brandy, the same of white wine, one of capillaire, a piece of lemon-peel, and nutmeg...
-Cecils
Mix over the fire for a few minutes the following ingredients: minced meat of whatever kind you please, bread crumbs, plenty of onion, lemon-peel, nutmeg, parsley chopped, pepper, salt, a little butte...
-How To Stew Celery
Wash and clean some heads of celery, cut them into pieces of two or three inches long, boil them in veal stock till tender. To half a pint of cream add the well-beaten yolks of two eggs, a bit of lemo...
-Charlotte
Charlotte (1) Cut a sufficient number of thin slices of white bread to cover the bottom and line the sides of a baking dish, first rubbing it thickly with butter. Put thin slices of apples into the d...
-Cheese Dishes
Cheese, Boiled Grate a quarter of a pound of good cheese, put it into a sauce pan, with a bit of butter the size of a nutmeg, and half a tea-cupful of milk, stir it over the fire till it boil, and th...
-Lemon Cheesecakes
Boil the peel of two large lemons till they are quite tender, and then pound it well in a mortar, with four or five ounces of loaf sugar, the yolks of six eggs, half a pound of fresh butter, and a lit...
-Cheesecakes
Cheesecakes (1) Put two quarts of new milk into a stewpan, set it near the fire, and stir in two table-spoonfuls of rennet: let it stand till it is set (this will take about an hour); break it well w...
-Cherry Brandy
Cherry Brandy (1) Pick and bruise eight pounds of black maroons, and the same quantity of small black cherries; let them stand for two months in a cask with six gallons of brandy, two pounds of crush...
-Brandy
Lemon Brandy Three quarts of brandy being put into an earthen jar that is fitted with a cover, a pound and three-quarters of fine loaf sugar, the thin parings of six lemons, and the juice of twelve, ...
-Chervil
Is principally used in soups and stuffing, and is generally preserved with other herbs as follows: take of sorrel, chervil, beet, purslain, and cucumbers, if in season, quantifies according to your li...
-Chestnuts
Should be placed on the fire in a pan with holes to roast; -first slitting or cutting a notch in the skins, to prevent their flying off. When done, serve them in dessert on a napkin, as hot as possibl...
-Chicken
Having picked the chickens, singe them well to remove all the hairs, etc, which may remain on the skin; then bruise the bone close to the foot, and draw the strings from the thigh. Take out the crop b...
-Chicken. Part 2
Chickens Chiringate Having taken off the feet, beat the breast bones of your chickens flat without breaking the skin, flour and fry them in butter; when of a nice brown take all the fat from the pan,...
-Chicken. Part 3
Chickens In A Minute Cut a chicken in pieces, and put it in a stewpan with a little butter; add to it some mushrooms, parsley, sprinkle flour over, and shake them; moisten it with stock or water, and...
-Chickens Creme
Chickens Creme (1) Parboil a couple of young chickens, cut them in pieces, and throw into warm water for half an hour; then do them over the fire in a little fresh butter, with salt, parsley, pepper,...
-Chicken Croquettes
Chicken Croquettes (1) Reduce two spoonfuls of veloute or sauce tour-nee, and add to it the yolks of four eggs; put to this the white meat of a chicken minced very small, and well mixed with the sauc...
-Pulled Chicken
Pulled Chicken (1) Half roast a chicken or fowl, skin and pull off in small flakes all the white meat and the meat of the legs, break the bones, and boil them in a little water till the strength be d...
-China Chilo
Mince a pint basin of undressed neck of mutton, or leg, and some of the fat; put two onions, a lettuce, a pint of green peas, a tea-spoonful of pepper, four spoonfuls of water, and two or three ounces...
-Chili Or Cayenne Wine
Pound and steep fifty fresh red Chilies, or a quar ter of an ounce of Cayenne pepper, in hal pint of brandy, white wine, or claret, for fourteen days. This is a bonne bouche for the lovers of Cayenn...
-Chocolate
Is rich, nutritious, and soothing, saponaceous, and cleansing; from which quality it often helps digestion, and excites the appetite. It is only proper for some of the leaner and stronger sort of phle...
-Chocolate Wine
Take a pint of Sherry, or a pint and a half of Port, four ounces and a half of chocolate, six ounces of fine sugar, and half an ounce of white starch, or fine flour; mix, dissolve, and boil all these ...
-Chops Or Steaks
Those who are nice about steaks, never attempt to have them, except in weather which permits the meat to be hung till it is tender, and give the butcher some days' notice of their wish for them. If, f...
-Chowder
Lay some slices cut from the fat part of a belly-piece of pork, in a deep stewpan, mix sliced onions with a variety of sweet herbs, and lay them on the pork. Bone and cut a fresh cod into thin slices,...
-Choux
Put a pint of water into a stewpan, with half a pound of fresh butter, the rinds of two lemons grated, a quarter of a pound of sugar, and a very little salt; as soon as the water begins to boil, add a...
-Cloves
Essence Of Clove Infuse a drachm of oil of cloves in two ounces of the strongest spirits of wine, apothecary's measure. Clove Water Mix a little cinnamon with the cloves, or the scent will be too s...
-Prepared Cochineal
Pound an ounce of cochineal to a very fine powder, pound also an ounce of cream of tartar, and two drachms of alum; put these ingredients into a saucepan with half a pint of water; when it boils take ...
-Cocoa
Is of the same nature as chocolate, but not so rich; and therefore lighter upon the stomach. Put into a saucepan one ounce of good cocoa and one quart of water; cover it, and when it boils, set it by...
-Cocoa-Nut Sweetmeat
Cocoa-Nut Sweetmeat. (1) Cut the nut out of the shell, pare it carefully, and throw it into cold water; then grate it, and boil it in clarified sugar, (a pound to each pound of the cocoa-nut) until q...
-Cod
A cod-fish should be firm and white, the gills red, and the eye lively; a fine fish is very thick about the neck; if the flesh is at all flabby it is not good. Cod is in its prime during the months of...
-Coffee
Coffee affords very little nourishment, and is apt to occasion heat, dryness, stimulation and tremors of the nerves, and for these reasons is thought to occasion palsies, watchfulness, and leanness. H...
-Coffee. Continued
Coffee The coffee-pot should be three parts full of boiling water; the coffee is to be added a spoonful at a time, and well stirred between each; then boil gently, still stirring to prevent the mixtu...
-Coffee Cream
Coffee Cream (1) Mix three cups of good coffee with one pint of cream, and sugar according to taste; boil them together, and reduce them about one-third; observe that the coffee must be done as if it...
-Collops
Cut some veal cutlets; fry them a good brown, but not too much; take some good gravy, thicken it with a little flour, boil it a few minutes; add Cayenne, catchup, truffles, morels, salt, mushrooms pic...
-Coloring For Jellies Cakes, Etc
For a beautiful red, boil fifteen grains of cochineal in the finest powder, with a drachm and a half of cream of tartar, in half a pint of water very slowly, half an hour. Add, in boiling, a bit of al...
-Consomme
Take eight or ten pounds of beef-steaks, eight old hens, two young ones, and four knuckles of veal; put these into a large pot, and fill it with strong broth; skim it well, cooling it three or four ti...
-Couglauffle
Couglauffle, German Take three pounds of flour, an ounce and a half of yeast, an ounce of fine salt, a quarter of a pound of sugar, twelve eggs, the yolks of twelve more, two pounds of fresh butler, ...
-Couques
Put into a saucepan the yolks of sixteen eggs, the rinds of two lemons, half an ounce of salt, and two ounces of sugar; on these pour a pint of boiling cream, stirring it quick; set it on the fire, bu...
-Court Bouillon
Cut a proper quantity of carrots, onions, celery, and turnips, and put them into a saucepan with butter, parsley, garlic, thyme, basil, salt, a mignonette and cloves; sweat them over a gentle fire; ad...
-Cow-Heel
In the hands of a skilful cook, will furnish several good meals; when boiled tender, cut it into handsome pieces, egg and bread-crumb them, and fry them a light brown; lay them round a dish, and put i...
-Cracknels
Mix a quart of flour, half a nutmeg grated, the yolks of four eggs beaten, with four spoonfuls of rosewater, into a stiff paste, with cold water; then rub in a pound of butter, and make into a crackne...
-Apple Cream
Apple Cream (1) Boil twelve large apples in water till soft, take off the peel, and press the pulp through a hair sieve upon half a pound of pounded loaf sugar; whip the whites of two eggs, add them ...
-Chocolate Cream
Chocolate Cream (1) Take a pint of milk, a gill of cream, the yolks of three eggs, and five ounces of powder sugar, mix these ingredients together, set them on the fire, stir it constantly, and let i...
-Creams
Arrow-Root Cream Mix a table-spoonful of arrow-root with a tea-cupful of cold water; let it settle, and pour the water off. Sweeten and boil a quart of milk with the peel of a lemon and some cinnamon...
-Creams. Part 2
Cream For Fruit Tarts Boil a stick of cinnamon, two or three peach leaves, or a few bruised bitter almonds, in a quart of milk; strain, sweeten, and mix it, when cool, with three or four well-beaten ...
-Creams. Part 3
Solid Cream Squeeze the juice of a large lemon upon three or four table-spoonfuls of pounded loaf sugar, add two table-spoonfuls of brandy, and one pint of cream; pour it from one cup into another, t...
-Creams. Part 4
Cream Biscuits Break six eggs, separate the yolks and whites, beat the former with six ounces of powder-sugar, and the same of flour; whisk the whites, and then mix them together; add to it whipped c...
-Italian Cream
Italian Cream (1) Boil a pint and a half of milk in a stewpan, then add to it the peel of a young lemon, some coriander seed, a bit of cinnamon, rather more than half a quarter of a pound of sugar, a...
-Orange Cream
Orange Cream (1) Squeeze and strain the juice of eleven oranges, sweeten it well with pounded loaf sugar, stir it over a slow fire till the sugar be dissolved, and take off the scum as it rises; when...
-Raspberry Cream
Raspberry Cream (1) Mix a little pounded loaf sugar with a pint and a half of good cream, about a tea-cupful of raspberry jelly, the grated rind of one, and the juice of half a lemon; beat it well to...
-Red Currant Cream
Red Currant Cream (1) Pick the currants from the stalks, put them into a jar closely covered, and stand it in a pan of cold water; let it boil for two hours, strain the juice through a sieve, and swe...
-Swiss Cream
Swiss Cream (1) Boil the grated peel of a large lemon, and three-quarters of a pound of pounded loaf sugar, in a pint of cream; squeeze the juice of the lemon upon a table-spoonful of flour, work it ...
-White Lemon Cream
White Lemon Cream (1) Rub, with some lumps of loaf sugar, the rinds of six lemons, and grate off the remainder; squeeze and strain the juice, and add the grated peel and sugar, with three-quarters of...
-Croquante Of Paste
Roll out paste, about the eighth of an inch thick; rub over a plain mould with a little fresh butter; lay on the paste very even, and equally thin on both sides; pare it round the rim; then with a sma...
-Croque
These are large pieces of ornamental confectionary, formed of various materials, as gimblettes, croquignoles,genoises, etc, or of oranges, cut into quarters, chestnuts, green nuts, etc, arranged withi...
-Crumpets
Crumpets (1) Make a pint of warm milk, a quarter of a pint of yeast broth, strained into a strong batter, with a sufficient quantity of flour; cover, and set it in a warm place to rise; then add a qu...
-Raised Crust
Raised Crust (1) Melt, in one pint of water, one pound of fresh lard; weigh four pounds of flour, put it into a basin, and when the water and lard is hut, with a horn spoon stir it by degrees amongst...
-Short Crust
Short Crust (1) Pound, sift, and dry two ounces of white sugar; then mix it with a pound of well dried Hour, rub-bing into it, so fine as not to be seen, three ounces of butter; then put the yolks of...
-Cucumbers
Stewed Cucumbers Peel and cut cucumbers in quarters, take out the seeds, and lay them on a cloth to drain off the water: when they are dry, flour and fry them in fresh butter; let the butter be quite...
-Cullis
Cullis (1) To a quart of gravy, put a table-spoonful of thickening, or from one to two table-spoonfuls of flour, according to the thickness you wish the gravy to be, into a basin, with a ladleful of ...
-Curacoa
Put five ounces of thin-cut Seville orange-peel, that has been dried and pounded, or, which is still better, of the fresh peel of a fresh shaddock, which may be bought at the orange and lemon shops in...
-Curds And Cream
Curds And Cream (1) With about half a table-spoonful of rennet, turn two quarts of milk just from the cow; drain off the whey, and fill a mould with the curd; when it has stood an hour or two, turn i...
-Currants
How To Candy Currants And Other Fruit Boil the fruit in clarified sugar as for preserving; take it out of the sirup and drain it upon sieves; sift over it through a lawn sieve, till quite white, poun...
-Curries
Cut fowls or rabbits into joints, and wash them clean; put two ounces of butter into a stewpan: when it is melted, put in the meat, and two middling-sized onions sliced, let them be over a smart fire ...
-Curry Powder
Curry Powder (1) Putthefollow-ing ingredients in a cool oven all night, and the next morning pound them in a marble mortar, and rub them through a fine sieve. Coriander-seed, three ounces, turmeric, ...
-Custard
Custard (1) Sweeten a quart of thin cream, or good milk, with pounded loaf sugar; boil it with a bit of cinnamon, and half the peel of a lemon; strain it, and when a little cooled, mix it gradually w...
-Custard. Continued
Common Custard Boil a pint of milk with a bit of cinnamon and two or three laurel leaves; mix with one table-spoonful of flour, or potato flour, two and a half of cold milk, put it into a lawn sieve,...
-Baked Custard
Baked Custard (1) Boil a pint of cream with mace and cinnamon; when cold, take four eggs, leaving out two of the whites, a little rose and orange-flower water, a little white wine, nutmeg, and sugar ...
-Boiled Custard
Boiled Custard (1) Boil in a pint of milk, five minutes, lemon-peel, corianders, and cinnamon, a small quantity of each, half a dozen of hitter almonds, blanched and pounded, and four ounces of loaf ...
-Lemon Custard
Lemon Custard (1) Boil two glasses of white wine, half a pint of water, and two table-spoonfuls of brandy; when nearly cold, add the grated peel and juice of two lemons, with half a pound of pounded ...
-Damsons
Damsons Bottled Gather them on a dry day before they are ripe, when they have just turned their color. Put them in wide-mouthed bottles, cork them close, and let them stand a fortnight; then carefull...
-Deer Horns
Beat one white, and six yolks of eggs; mix them with five table spoonfuls of pounded and sifted loaf sugar, the same quantity of sweet cream, ten sweet almonds, blanched and pounded, the grated peel o...
-Devil
Devil (1) Score the leg of a roasted turkey, goose, or fowl; pepper and salt it well, broil it, and pour over it the following sauce made quite hot: three table-spoonfuls of gravy, one of melted butt...
-Devonshire Junket
Devonshire Junket (1) Turn some new milk from the cow with a little rennet; sweeten some thick cream, add a little pounded cinnamon, make it scalding hot, and when cold pour it over the curd, and put...
-How To Clarify Drippings
Put your dripping into a clean saucepan over a stove or slow fire; when it is just going to boil, skim it well, let it boil, and then let it stand till it is a little cooled; then pour it through a si...
-Duck
Mind your duck is well cleaned, and wiped out with a clean cloth: for the stuffing, take an ounce of onion and half an ounce of green sage; chop them very fine, and mix them with two ounces, i. e. abo...
-How To Stew Duck
How To Stew (1) Duck Cut one or two ducks into quarters; fry them a light brown in butter; put them into a saucepan, with pint of gravy, a tea-cupful of Port wine, our onions whole, pepper and some s...
-Dumplings
Dumplings, Hard Mix as for a paste, some flour with small beer or water, and a little salt; roll them in balls rather larger than an egg; when the water boils put them in: half an hour will boil them...
-Dutch Flummery
Dutch Flummery (1) Boil, with a pint of white wine, some sugar, the juice of two, and the pee) of one lemon, a stick of cinnamon, and half an ounce of dissolved isinglass; strain, and mix it with the...
-Echaude's
Lay a quartern of flour on a pasteboard or slab, make a hole in the centre, in which put an ounce of salt, and a little water to dissolve it, a pound of butter, twenty eggs; mix the two latter well to...
-Eels
Eels And Soles Stewed Wig-Sy's Way Take two pounds of fine silver eels: the best are those that are rather more than a half-crown piece in circumference, quite-fresh, full of life, and as brisk as a...
-Stewed Eels
Stewed Eels (1) Cut the eels into pieces about four inches long; take two onions, two shallots, a bunch of parsley, thyme, two bay leaves, a little mace, black and Jamaica pepper, a pint of good grav...
-Eggs
Eggs (1) Eggs may be preserved for twelve months, in a sweet and palatable state for eating in the shell, or using for salads, by boiling them for one minute; and when wanted for use let them be boil...
-Eggs. Part 2
Eggs Boiled To Eat In The Shell, Or For Salads The fresher laid the better: put them into boiling water; if you like the white just set, about two minutes boiling is enough; a new-laid egg will take ...
-Eggs. Part 3
Egg Fritters Pound a dozen hard boiled eggs with a little cream, and a quarter of a pound of beef marrow; then pound half a dozen macaroons, some bitter almonds, a little sugar, and lemon-peel; mix t...
-Egg Marmalade
Egg Marmalade (1) Blanch and pound with a little rose water, two ounces of sweet almonds, the same of orange marmalade, and four of citron; add two spoonfuls of brandy, and when quite smooth, the bea...
-How To Poach Eggs
The cook who wishes to display her skill in poaching, must endeavour to procure eggs that have been laid a couple of days - those that are quite new-laid are so milky that, take all the care you can, ...
-Elder
Elder Flower Fritters They are made whilst the elder flowers are in bloom; and they should marinate three or four hours in brandy, sugar, orange-flower water, and lemon-peel; when drained, dip them i...
-Elderberries
Can be made to produce excellent wine, allowing to a ten-gallon cask forty pounds of fruit, forty pounds of sugar, and a quarter of a pound of tartar. When elderberry wine is desired for a warm cordia...
-Empotage
Put into a large saucepan, three or four pounds of beef-steaks, a knuckle of veal, and four old hens; moisten this quantity of meat with two ladlesful of broth; set it on a stove, and let it boil till...
-Endive In Veloute
Take off all the outer leaves of your endive, and having opened the hearts, put them into cold water to wash them. In the meanwhile heat a kettle of water, put in it a handful of salt, then throw in t...
-Entree
There is no word precisely equivalent to this in English. Any dish of butcher's meat, fowl, game, or fish, dressed for the first course, is called an entree. Entresiet There is no word equivalent to...
-Eschalot Wine
Peel, mince, and pound in a mortar, three ounces of eschalots, and infuse them in a pint of Sherry for ten days; then pour oft the clear liquor on three ounces more eschalots, and let the wine stand o...
-Espagnole
Take an old fowl, and about fourteen pounds of leg or shoulder of veal; chop the latter into pieces, and put it, with very little water, into a large saucepan, with two carrots, three onions, a pound ...
-Essence
Take half a bottle of white wine, half a glass of the best vinegar, the juice of two lemons, three ounces of salt, half an ounce of whole pepper, a- little nutmeg and mace, four cloves, four bay-leave...
-Fanchonettes
Put into a saucepan, two ounces of flour, three of sugar, one of butter, two of pounded almonds, some green lemon-peel, two yolks, and one whole egg, a little salt, and half a pint of milk; put these ...
-Fawn
Like a sucking pig, should be dressed almost as soon as killed. When very young, it is trussed, stuffed, and spitted the same way as a hare: but they are better eating when of the size of a house iamb...
-Filbert Rolls
Having peeled half a pound of filberts, put them into a preserving pan over a moderate fire, and stir them constantly with a spatula until they become equally colored of a light vel-Jow: then set them...
-Fish
We insert all the best remarks that various culinary authors have made on Fish. There is a general rule in choosing most kinds of fish; if their gills are red, their eyes plump, and the whole fish st...
-Fish Gravy
Fish Gravy (1) Cut two or three little fish of any kind into small pieces; put them into a saucepan, with rather more water than will cover them, a bit of toasted bread, a blade of mace, some lemon-p...
-Fish Rechauffe
Fish Rechauffe (1) After pike, cod, skate, turbot, soles, or any other white fish has been dressed, pick it from the bones into small bits; add to a pound of fish, or in the same proportion, half a p...
-Flounders Boiled
Flounders Boiled (1) Put on a stewpan with a sufficient quantity of water to cover the flounders which are to be dressed; put in some vinegar and horse-radish; when the water boils put in the fish, h...
-Flummery
Steep three large hand-fuls of very small white oatmeal a day and night in cold water; then pour it off clear; then add as much more water, and let it stand another day and a night. Then strain it thr...
-Fondus
Put some grated cheese into a basin, with pepper and a little melted butter, and the yolks of eggs; stir them together; whip the whites of the eggs to a firm froth, and add them, a little at a time, t...
-Forcemeat Stuffing
Forcemeat is now considered an indispensable accompaniment to most made dishes, and when composed with good taste, gives additional spirit and relish to even that sovereign of savouriness, turtle so...
-Forcemeat
Take an equal quantity of lean veal scraped, and beef suet shred; beat them in a marble mortar; add pepper, salt, cloves, pounded lemon-peel, and nutmeg grated, parsley and sweet herbs, chopped fine, ...
-Fowls
When a cock is young, his spurs are short; take care that you are not deceived by their having been cut or pared, a trick that is often practised. If fresh their vent will be close and dark. Hens are ...
-Fowls. Part 2
Fowl Broiled Split them down the back, well salt and pepper them; then broil them. Serve with mushroom sauce. Fowl Capilotade Take the remains of a ready dressed fowl, and put them into a stewpan; ...
-Fowls. Part 3
Fowl Pulled Skin a cold chicken, fowl, or turkey; take off the fillets from the breasts, and put them into a stewpan with the rest of the white meat and wings, side-bones, and merry-thought, with a p...
-Frangipane
Take a saucepan, and put into it five spoonfuls of flour, five eggs, a pint of milk, an ounce of butter and a little salt; set it on the fire, stirring constantly until it has boiled ten minutes, taki...
-French Beans
Cut off the stalk end first, and then turn to the point and strip off the strings. If not quite fresh, have a bowl of spring-water, with a little salt dissolved in it, standing before you, and as the ...
-French Supper Dish
Pare off the crust, and cut one or two slices of bread into bits of two or three inches square; fry them in butter; put them upon a hot dish, and lay upon each bit some warmed preserve, or stew for a ...
-Fricandellans
Mince about two pounds of tender lean beef, and three-quarters of a pound of fresh suet, then pound it till it be as smooth as a paste, and carefully pick out all the threads and sinews; add four well...
-Fricassee
Fricassee Brown Take two or three young rabbits, cut them in pieces, and stew them in gravy made of beef, some whole pepper, two shallots, one or two anchovies, a bit of horse-radish, and a little sw...
-Fritters
Fritters (1) Make them of any of the battel's directed for pancakes, by dropping a small quantity into the pan, or make the plainer sort, and put pared apples sliced and cored in the batter, and fry ...
-Fritters. Continued
Fritters En Surprise Take eight middling-sized apples, pare, and leave on the stalks; cut off about a fourth part of the stalk end of each apple, and scoop out the inside of each piece, so as to form...
-Candied Fruit
Candied Fruit (1) It must first be preserved, then dipped in warm water, dried with a cloth, and strewed all over with sifted sugar, and dried in a stove or oven, turning as occasion requires. Candi...
-Fruit
Fruits are of different degrees of digestibility. Those of a hard texture, as some kinds of apples, melons, apricots, several sorts of fleshy plums, and all immature fruits, are difficult of digestion...
-Game
In choosing venison, the fat of that which is good is thick, clear, and bright; the clift part smooth and close. When the venison is perfectly fresh, it is hung in a cool place, and carefully wiped dr...
-Garlic
Garlic Butter Sauce Pound half a dozen cloves of garlic; rub them through a silk sieve, with a wooden spoon; put this into a mortar with some butter, and beat it until thoroughly incorporated; then p...
-Gateau De Compiegne
Take three pounds of flour, two pounds of butter, an ounce and four drachms of yeast, an ounce of salt, a quarter of a pound of sugar, a glass of cream, twelve yolks and twelve whole eggs, and five or...
-Giblets Stewed
Clean two sets of giblets, put them into a saucepan, just cover them with cold water, and set them on the fire; when they boil, lake off the scum, and put in an onion, three cloves, or two blades of m...
-Gingerbread
Rub one pound of butter well into three pounds of flour; then add one pound of powder-sugar, one pound of treacle, and two ounces of ginger pounded and sifted very fine; one nutmeg grated very fine; t...
-Glaze
Glaze (1) Take the remains of any liquor in which meat has been cooked, and strain it through a silk sieve until quite clear; then put it into a saucepan and reduce it over a brisk fire: as soon as i...
-Godiveau
Take fillet of veal or breasts of fowl or game, fresh pork or sausage meat, beef-marrow or suet, equal quantities of each, veal sweetbreads, truffles, and mushrooms; season these articles with pepper,...
-Goose
How To Choose Goose Be careful in choosing a goose, that the bill and feet are yellow, as it will be young: when old the feet and bill are red. When they are fresh the feet are pliable; if stale they...
-Gooseberry
Gooseberry Cream Boil one quart of gooseberries very quick, in as much water as will cover them: stir in about half an ounce of good butter; when they are soft, pulp them through a sieve; sweeten the...
-Fried Gourds
Gourds Fried (1) Cut five or six gourds in quarters; take off the skin and pulp; stew them in the same manner as for table: when done, drain them quite dry; beat up an egg, and dip the gourds in it. ...
-Grapes
Grapes, Compote Boil a quarter of a pound of sugar with half a glass of water, till it is reduced to a strong sirup; skim, and then put into it a pound of grapes, picked from the stalks, and the seed...
-Gratin
Cut half a pound of fillet of veal into dice, and put it into a stewpan with a piece of butter, a few mushrooms, parsley, shallots chopped small, salt, pepper, and spices; stir them up with a wooden s...
-Gravies
The skirts of beef and the kidney, will make quite as good gravy as any other meat, if prepared in the same manner. The kidney of an ox, or the milt, makes excellent gravy, cut all to pieces, and pre...
-Gravies And Sauces
It is of as much importance that the cook should know how to make a boat of good gravy for poultry, etc. as that it should be sent up of proper complexion, and nicely frothed. We shall endeavor to in...
-Gravies And Sauces. Continued
Gravies, Essence Of Ham For Pick off all the bits of meat from a ham-bone, pound them, break the bone, and put all into a saucepan, together with nearly half a pint of water, and a bunch of sweet her...
-Gravy Made Without Meat
Gravy Made Without Meat (1) Slice three onions, and fry them brown in a little butter; add them to half a pint of water, and the same of beer, put in some peppercorns, salt, a little lemon peel, thre...
-Gravy For Roast Meat
Gravy For Roast Meat. (1) Most joints will afford sufficient trimmings, etc. to make half a pint of plain gravy, which you may color with a few drops of browning: for those that do not, about half an...
-Gravy And Sauce Ingredients
Browning for made dishes Put into a saucepan one pound of good brown sugar, stir it constantly over a slow fire, boil it till it is as thick as treacle, and resembles it in color; take the pan off th...
-Ham
If it is a very dry Westphalia ham, it must be soaked, according to its age and thickness, from twelve to twenty-four hours; for a green ham, from four to eight hours will be suffcient. Lukewarm water...
-Ham. Continued
Ham Omelet Take a slice of boiled ham, mince it as small as possible, and mix it with a dozen eggs beaten with a little veal gravy; fry it (keeping it of an equal thickness) in the usual manner. Ham...
-Hare
As soon as the cook receives a hare, she should take out the liver, etc, wipe it well, put in a little pepper, and hang it up. When wanted for dressing, cut off the four legs at the first joint, raise...
-Haricot Mutton
Cut the best end of a neck or loin of mutton, that has been kept till tender, into chops of equal thickness, one rib to each; trim off some of the fat, and the lower end of the chine bone, and scrape ...
-Hattered Kit
Hattered Kit (1) Make two quarts of new milk scalding hot, and pour it quickly upon four quarts of fresh-made butter milk, after which it must not be stirred; let it remain till cold and firm, then t...
-Hawthorn Liquor
The full blossoms of the white thorn are to be picked dry and clean from the leaves and stalks, and as much put into a large bottle as it will hold lightly without pressing down; it is then to be fill...
-How To Make Hedgehog
Blanch two pounds of sweet almonds, beat them to a paste in a mortar, moistening occasionally with Canary and orange-flower water; beat the yolks of twelve, and the whites of seven eggs with a pint of...
-Herbs
A Bunch Of Sweet Herbs Is made up of parsley, sweet marjoram, winter savory, orange and lemon thyme; the greatest proportion of parsley. Sweet Herbs These in cookery are parsley, chibbol, rocambole...
-Herrings
There are three sorts of herrings, fresh, salted, and dried or red herrings. They are emptied and cleaned like any other fish; when fresh, they are broiled, and served with melted butler, white sauce,...
-Hibbocras
Take one ounce of cinnamon, two drachms of ginger, two penny-weights of cloves, nutmeg, and galangal a penny-weight of each. Bound these together well, and infuse them in a pint of red or white wine, ...
-Hog's Head
But a head into some pickle, and when it has lain sufficiently long, take it out and boil it till the bones will come out with ease; then skin, bone, and chop the meat, whilst hot; season it with pepp...
-Honey
Honey is nourishing and wholesome, particularly for persons with coughs, weak lungs, and short breath. It is balsamic, cleansing, and makes the body soluble. Great care should be taken to get it fres...
-Horseradish Powder
The time to make this is during November and December; slice it the thickness of a shilling, and lay it to dry very gradually in a Dutch oven (a strong heat soon evaporates its flavor); when dry enoug...
-Hot Pickle
Boil, in two quarts of vinegar, a quarter of a pound of salt, two ounces of shallots or garlic, and two of ginger, one ounce of pepper, one of yellow mustard seed, and a quarter of an ounce of cayenne...
-Ice
Sorbetieres or moulds for cream or fruit-ices, are made of two sorts of materials, block-tin and pewter; of these, the latter is the best, the substance to be iced congealing more gradually in it than...
-Icing
Ice For Icing (How To Prepare) Take a few pounds of ice, break it almost to powder, and throw in among it a large handful and a half of salt; you must prepare in the coolest part of the house, that a...
-India Pickle
India Pickle (1) Take one pound of ginger, put it into a pan with salt and wa-ter, and let it lay all night, then scrape it, and cut it into thin slices; put it into a pan with half a pound of bay sa...
-Irish Rock
Blanch a pound of sweet ami and ounce of bitter almonds, pick out a few of the sweet almonds, and cut them like straws, and blanch them in rose water; pound the rest in a mortar with a table-spoonful ...
-Irish Stew Or Hunter's Pie
Take part of a neck of mutton, cut it into chops, season it well, put it into a stewpan, let it brase for half an hour, take two dozen of potatoes, boil them, mash them, and season them, butter your m...
-How To Clarify Isinglass
Take an ounce and quarter of the best isinglass, cut it into small pieces, and wash them several times in warm water. Put the isinglass into a preserving pan, with five glasses of filtered water, set ...
-Italian Cheese
Mix with nearly half a pound of pounded loaf sugar, the juice of three lemons, two table-spoonfuls of white wine, and a quart of cream; beat it with a whisk till quite thick, which may be in half an h...
-Italian Macaroons
Take one pound of Valentia or Jordan almonds, blanched, pound them quite fine with the whites of four eggs; add two pounds and a half of sifted loaf sugar, and rub them well together with the pestle; ...
-Apricot Jam
Apricot Jam (1) Weigh equal quantities of pounded loaf sugar and of apricots; pare and cut them quite small; as they are done, strew over half of the sugar. The following day boil the remainder, and ...
-Jams
Black Currant Jam Gather your currants on a dry day, when they are full ripe, pick them from the stalks, wash them well in a basin, and to every pound of currants, put a pound of double refined sugar...
-Jaune Mange
Boil an ounce of isinglass in three-quarters of a pint of water till melted; strain it, then add the juice of two Seville oranges, a quarter of a pint of white wine, the yolks of four eggs, beaten and...
-Jelly
To a quart of the stock jelly put half a pound of loaf sugar pounded, a stick or two of cinnamon broken into small bits, the peel of a lemon, a pint of currant wine, and one of Sherry or Tererift'e, a...
-Jelly. Part 2
Jelly For Entremets Hartshorn, calf's feet, and isinglass, are the usual materials used to coagulate sweet jellies; of these three, the latter is the best, as, when properly clarified, (for which see...
-Jelly. Part 3
Quince Jelly Quinces for jelly ought not to be quite ripe, they should, however, be of a fine yellow color; take off the down which covers them, quarter, core, put them into a saucepan, with water en...
-Barberry Jelly
Barberry Jelly (1) Pick a pint of barberries, and put them into a stew-pan with boiling water, cover it close and let it stand till nearly cold. Set on the fire some clarified sugar with a little wat...
-Jelly Of Currants, Grape, Raspberry
Are all made precisely in the same manner. When the fruit is full ripe, gather it on a dry day: as soon as it is nicely picked, put it into a jar, and cover it down very close. Set the jar in a sauce...
-Damson Jelly
To eight pounds of damsons, put eight pounds of fine sugar, and half a pint of water; boil them for half an hour over a gentle fire, till the skins break; then take them oft', and set them by for an h...
-Orange Jelly
Orange Jelly (1) Squeeze the juice of eight oranges and six lemons, grate the peel of half the fruit, and steep it in a pint of cold water; mix it with the juice, three-quarters of a pound of loaf su...
-Juice
The proportion of oranges should be double that of lemons; the fruit being selected free from decay, and wiped dry, they are to be squeezed, and the juice strained through a sieve into an earthen pan;...
-Julienne
This soup is composed of carrots, turnips, leeks, onions, celery, lettuce, sorrel and chervil; the roots are cut in thin slips, about an inch long, the onions are halved and then sliced; the lettuce a...
-Justice's Orange Sirup For Punch Or Puddings
Squeeze the oranges, and strain the juice from the pulp into a large pot; boil it up with a pound and a half of fine sugar to each pint of juice; skim it well; let it stand till cold; then bottle it, ...
-Kavia
Take the hard roes of several sturgeon, and lay them in a tub of water; take away ail the fibres as you would from a calf's brains, then, with a whisk, beat the roes in the water, shaking off from the...
-Kerry Butter Milk
Put six quarts of butter-milk into a cheese cloth, hang it in a cool place, and let the whey drip from it for two or three days; when it is rather thick, put it into a basin, sweeten it with pounded l...
-Kew Mince
Cut a pound of meat from a. leg of cold roasted mutton, and mince it very finely, together with six ounces of suet, mix with it three or four table-spoonfuls of crumbs of bread, the beaten yolks of fo...
-Kid
Kid is good eating when it is but three or four months old, its flesh is then delicate and tender, but is not used after it has done sucking. To be good, it ought to be fat and white. It is dressed in...
-Kidneys
Cut them through the long way, score them, and sprinkle them over with a little pepper and salt; in order to broil all over alike, and to keep them from curling on the gridiron, run a wire skewer righ...
-Lamb
The fore quarter of lamb consists of the shoulder, the neck, and the breast together; the hind quarter is the leg and loin. There are also the head and pluck, the fry or sweetbreads, skirts, lamb-ston...
-Lamb. Continued
Lamb Chops Broiled Cut a loin or best end of the neck into chops, flatten them, and cut off the fat and skin; rub the gridiron with a little fat, and broil them on a clear fire. Turn them with steak ...
-Larks
These delicate little birds are in high season in November. When they are thoroughly picked, gutted, and cleansed. Miss them; do them over with the yolk of egg, and then roll them in bread-crumbs; 6p...
-Lavender Drops
Fill a quart bottle with the blossoms of lavender, and pour on it as much brandy as it will contain; let it stand ten days, then strain it, and add of nutmeg bruised, cloves, mace, and cochineal, a qu...
-How To Green, For Ornamenting Fruit Leaves
Take small leaves of a pear-tree, keep them close stopped in a pan of verjuice and water, give them a boil in some sirup of apricots; put them between two pieces of glass to dry; smooth and cut them i...
-Leeks
Leeks are most generally used for soups, ragouts, and other made dishes, they are very rarely brought to table; in which case dress them as follows: - Put them into the stock-pot till about three part...
-Leipzeger Pancakes
Beat well the whites of four, and the yolks of eight fresh eggs, and add, by degrees, half a pound of pounded loaf sugar, a pint and a half of sweet cream just warmed, half a pound of clarified fresh ...
-Lemonade
To a gallon of spring water add some cinnamon and cloves, plenty of orange and plenty of lemon-juice, and a bit of the peel of each; sweeten well with loaf sugar, and whisk it with the whites of six e...
-Lemon Bonbons
Take two pounds of the best lump sugar, clarify and boil it to caramel; but just before it reaches that point, grate the rind of a lemon and put in it; in the meanwhile melt a little butter; skim, and...
-Lemon Chips
Take large smooth-rinded Malaga lemons; race or cut off their peel into chips with a small knife (this will require some practice to do it properly); throw them into salt and water till next day; have...
-Lemon Essence
Rasp your lemons all round, very thin, and for every quarter of a pound of rind, allow one pound of sugar; mix it well with a large spaddle till you find it is all of the same color, and that the rind...
-Lemon Marmalade
Allow to a pound of lemons eighteen ounces of fine loaf sugar: grate the rind of a few; cut them into half; squeeze and strain the juice; boil the skins in the same way as those of the orange skins ar...
-Lemon Pickle
Lemon Pickle (1) Grate off a little of the outer rind of two dozen of lemons, divide them into four rather more than half way down, leaving the bottom part whole; rub on them equally half a pound of ...
-Lemon Dishes
Lemon Mince Pies Squeeze out the juice from a large lemon; boil the outside ti!i sufficiently tender to beat to a mash, add to it three large apples chopped, and four ounces of suet, half a pound of ...
-Lobster
Buy these alive; the lobster merchants sometimes keep them till they are starved, before they boil them; they are then watery, have not half their flavor, and like other persons that die of a consumpt...
-Lobster Patties
Lobster Patties (1) Pick the meat and red berries out of a lobster, mince them finely, add grated bread, chopped parsley, and butter; season with grated nutmeg, white pepper, and salt; add a little w...
-Lobster Pie
Lobster Pie (1) Boil the lobsters, and cut the meat of the tail into four bits; take out the meat from the claws and bothes, pound it in a mortar, add the soft part of one lobster, and season with pe...
-Luncheon For An Invalid
Put bread crumbs and red currant, or any other jelly, alternately into a tumbler, and when nearly half full, fill it up with milk. ...
-Macaroni
How To Make Macaroni Beat four eggs for eight or ten minutes, strain them, and stir in flour till stiff enough to work into a paste upon a marble, or stone slab; add flour till it be a stiff paste, a...
-How To Serve Macaroni
How To Serve (1) Macaroni Simmer it in a little stock, with pounded mace and salt. When quite tender, take it out of the liquor, lay it in a dish, grate over it a good deal of cheese, then over that ...
-Mackerel
How To Choose Mackerel Their gills should be of a fine red, their eyes full, and the whole fish stiff and bright; if the gills are of a faint color, the fish limber and wrinkled, they are not fresh. ...
-Made Dishes
Be careful to trim off all the skin, gristle, etc. that will not be eaten; and shape handsomely, and of even thickness, the various articles which compose your made dishes: this is sadly neglected by ...
-Madelaines
Take nine ounces of powder-sugar, eight of flour, the yolks of four and six whole eggs, two spoonfuls of brandy, and a grain of salt; put these into a saucepan, stirring continually, until the paste t...
-Maitre D'Hotel
Cold Maitre D'Hotel Put a quarter of a pound of butter into a saucepan, with some paisley and shallots, minced small salt, whole pepper, and lemon-juice; mix the whole together with a wooden spoon. P...
-Marchpane Royal
Take a pound of sweet almonds, blanch and throw them into cold water, drain and pound them, moistening with orange-flower and plain water, but take care not to put too much at once. The almonds being ...
-How To Preserve Sweet Marjoram
Beat up very well the white of an egg, then beat very fine and sift some double-refined sugar; take some marjoram and rub it on a glass that is quite clean, and lay ii in the form of the glass; so do ...
-Marmalade
Marmalade may be composed of almost any fruits; the best, however, for this purpose are, apricots, peaches, oranges, quinces, egg-plums, apples, etc. They are usually made by boiling the fruit and sug...
-Marrow Bones
Chop the bones at each end so as to stand steady, then wash them clean, saw them in halves, cover the top with a floured cloth: boil them, and serve with dry toast. ...
-Matelote Meat
Take beef, veal, mutton, and pork, a large slice of each, and a small one of leg of lamb; cut them in small pieces, which put into a saucepan with equal quantities of stock and champaign, salt and spi...
-Mead
Mead (1) To every gallon of water put four pounds of honey, boil it an hour. Then put it into a tub with some yeast on a toast; cover it over. If it ferments well after three or four days, draw it of...
-Meat Cakes
Take whatever meat, game, or poultry, you may chance to have, (it is the better for being under-done); mince it fine, adding a little fat bacon or ham, or anchovy; season with a little pepper and salt...
-How To Keep Hot Meat
If your meat is done before you are ready to serve, take it up, set the dish over a pan of boiling water, put a deep cover over it, so as not to touch the meat, and then put a cloth over that. This wa...
-Milk Punch
Milk Punch (1) Beat up two eggs well, mix them in a quart of milk, sugar, nutmeg, and lemon-peel to your taste; boil it gently, stirring it all the time till thick enough; take it off the (ire a very...
-Minced Collops
This is a favorite Scotch dish; few families are without it: it keeps well, and is always ready to make an extra dish. Take beef, and chop and mince it very small; to which add some salt and pepper. P...
-Mince Meat
Two pounds of beef suet, picked and chopped fine; two pounds of apple, pared, cored, and minced; three pounds of currants, washed and picked; one pound of raisins, stoned and chopped fine; one pound o...
-Minuten Fleish
Cut from off a leg of veal some slices as thin as the blade of a knife, and about four inches long; season them with pepper and salt, lay them into a deep dish, pour over them nearly half a pint of wh...
-Mock Arrack
Dissolve two scruples of flowers of benjamin in a quart of good rum, and it will immediately impart to it the inviting fragrance of Vauxhall nectar. ...
-Mock Goose Or Leg Of Pork Roasted Without The Skin
Parboil it; take off the skin, and then put it down to roast; baste it with butter, and make a savory powder of finely minced, or dried and powdered sage, ground black pepper, sah, and some bread-crum...
-Mock Ice
Of preserved strawberries, raspberries, and red currant jelly, a table-spoonful each; rub it through a sieve, with as much cream as will fill a shape; dissolve three-quarters of an ounce of isinglass ...
-How To Stew Moorfowl
Truss them, keeping on their heads, but draw the legs within the body; mix well some salt and pepper with flour and a piece of butter, and put a small bit into each bird; fry them all over of a nice b...
-Muffins
Muffins (1) Take one pint of milk quite warm, and a quarter of a pint of thick small-beer yeast; strain them into a pan, and add sufficient flour to make it like a batter; cover it over, and let it s...
-Mullagatawny
Boil slowly in two quarts of water one pound of split peas, half an ounce of butter, two onions sliced, a little salt, cayenne, and two blades of mace. When the peas are tender, put in a large fowl, c...
-Mulled Wine
Put into a pint of Port wine two or three cloves and a bit of cinnamon; boil it for a few moments; lake out the spice, sweeten it with loaf sugar, and grate in a little nutmeg. Serve with a slice of t...
-Mushrooms
How To Choose Mushrooms The mushrooms proper to be used in cookery grow in the open pasture land, for those that grow near or under trees, are poisonous. The eatable mushrooms first appear very small...
-Mustard
Mustard quickens the appetite, warms the stomach, assists in digesting hard meats, and dries up surpertiuous moisture. It seldom agrees with weak stomachs. Mix (by degrees, by rub bing together in a ...
-Mutton
Mutton (1) The pipe that runs along the bone of the inside of a chine of mutton ought to be taken away; and if it is to be kept any length of lime, the part close round the tail should be rubbed with...
-Mutton. Part 2
Mutton Breast Collared Bone it and take out all the gristles, make a forcemeat with crumbs of bread, chopped parsley, a little lemon thyme, and one anchovy minced; season with salt and white pepper, ...
-Mutton. Part 3
Mutton Cutlets Cut into cutlets a pound and a half of the thick part of a leg of mutton, and beat them; mix with grated bread crumbs, some pepper, salt, and finely chopped parsley, lemon thyme, and s...
-Mutton. Part 4
Mutton Pasty To Eat As Nice Mut As Venison Take a fat loin of mutton, and let it hang for several days, then bone il-Beat it well with a rolling pin; then rub en pounds of meat with a quarter of a po...
-Mutton Leg
Mutton Leg (1) If your leg of mutton is roasted, serve with onion or currant-jelly sauce; if it is boiled, serve with caper-sauce and vegetables. In roasting or boiling, a quarter of an hour is usual...
-Mutton Loin
Roast it; some people think it eats much better if cut lengthways like a saddle. It may also be used for steaks, pies, or broth, only taking care to cut off as much fat as possible. Stewed Mutton Loi...
-Mutton Haunch
Like Venison Mutton Haunch Take a fat haunch of large fine mutton, let it hang a week, then pound one ounce of black, and one ounce of Jamaica pepper, and rub them over the mutton, pour a bottle of P...
-Mutton Neck
Mutton Neck (1) This joint is particularly useful, as so many dishes may be made of it. The bone ought to be cut short. The best end of the neck may be boiled, and served with turnips; or if you thi...
-Stewed Mutton Shoulder
Stewed Mutton Shoulder (1) Bone a shoulder of mutton with a sharp knife, and fill the space with the following stuffing: - grated bread, minced suet, parsley, pepper, salt, and nutmeg; bind with the ...
-Naples Curd
Put into a quart of new milk a stick of cinnamon, boil it a few minutes, take out the cinnamon, and stir in eight well-beaten eggs, and a table-spoonful of white wine; when it boils again, strain it t...
-Nasturtiums Pickled
As soon as the blossoms are off, gather the little knobs; put them into cold water with some salt; shift them once a day for three successive days; make a cold pickle of white wine vinegar, a little w...
-Fresh Neat's Tongue
Fresh Neat's Tongue, In A Plain Way Lard a tongue with tolerable-sized lardons, and boil it in broth, or in water, with a few onions and roots; when it is done, peel it, and serve it with broth, spri...
-Nougat
Blanch and wash a pound of sweet almonds, and having drained them well, cut each into five slips, which place in a gentle oven to dry; let them be all equally colored of a clear yellow; in the meantim...
-Noyau
Noyau (1) Peaches and nectarines, in equal quantities, are to be bruised, the stones broken, and the kernels blanched and bruised; they are then to be put into a jar in layers, one of fruit, one of k...
-Oat Cakes
Oat Cakes are made in the same manner as muffins, using sifted oatmeal instead of flour, and three gallons of water instead of two: pull the dough into pieces, roll and finish the cakes as directed fo...
-Oatmeal Porridge
Boil some water in a saucepan with a little salt, and stir oatmeal into it with a thevil; when of a proper thickness, let it boil for four or five minutes, stirring it all the time; then pour it into ...
-Olive Royals
Boil one pound of potatoes, and when nearly cold rub them perfectly smooth with four ounces of flour and one ounce of butter, and knead it together till it become a paste; roll it out about a quarter ...
-Olives
Olives that have been gathered immature or unripe, and put into a pickle to keep them sound, are apt, especially if frequently eaten, to obstruct the stomach and passages. The best way of eating them ...
-Omelets And Various Ways Of Dressing Eggs
There is no dish which may be considered as coming under the denomination of a made dish of the second order, which is so generally eaten, if good, as an omelet; and no one is so often badly dressed: ...
-Omelet
Omelet (1) Five or six eggs will make a good-sized omelet: break them into a basin, and beat them well with a fork; and add a salt-spoonful of salt; have ready chopped two drachms of onion, or three ...
-Onions
The small round silver button onions, about as big as a nutmeg, make a very nice pickle. Take off their top coats, have ready a stewpan, three parts filled with boiling water, into which put as many o...
-Stewed Onions
Stewed Onions (1) Take a dozen of good-sized onions, peel and put them on in the following sauce: - A pint of veal stock, a bit of butler rolled in flour, a little pepper, and salt. Stew them gently ...
-Orange Dishes
Orange Biscuits Take the grated rind of an orange, six fresh eggs, a quarter of a pound of flour, and three-quarters of a pound of powder sugar; put these into a mortar, beat them to a paste, which p...
-Orangeade
Orangeade (1) Squeeze the juice; pour some boiling water on the peel, and cover it closely; boil water and sugar to a thin sirup, and skim it; when all are cold, mix the juice, the infusion, and the ...
-Orgeat
Orgeat (1) Pound very fine one pound of Jordan, and one ounce of bitter, almonds, in a marble mortar, with half a gill of orange-flower water to keep them from oiling; then mix with, them one pint o...
-Directions For The Oven
Be very careful to keep your oven clean, and that there are no remains of sugar or fat that may have run over from any thing that has been bailing. Puff-pastes require a moderately hoi oven, but not t...
-Ox-Cheeks
Ox-Cheek Stewed Prepare this the day before it is to be eaten; clean it, and put it into soft water just warm; let it lie three or four hours, then put it into cold water, and let it soak all night; ...
-How To Feed Oysters
Some piscivorous gourmands think that oysters are not best when quite fresh from their beds, and that their flavor is too brackish and harsh, and is much ameliorated by giving them a feed. Cover them...
-Fried Oysters
Fried Oysters (1) Make a batter as for pancakes, seasoned with grated nutmeg, white pepper, and salt, and add some finely grated bread crumbs; dip in the oysters, and fly them of a light brown in bee...
-Oyster Ketchup
Oyster Ketchup (1) Take fine fresh oysters; wash them in their own liquor; skim it; pound them in a marble mortar; to a pint of oysters add a pint of Sherry; boil them up, and add an ounce of salt, t...
-Oysters
Oyster Attelets Cut into small pieces a sweetbread and a slice or two of bacon, beard some large oysters, and season all highly with chopped parsley, shallot, a little thyme, pepper and salt. Then fa...
-Oyster Patties
Make some rich puff-paste, and bake it in very small tin patty pans. When cool, turn them out upon a large dish. Stew some large fresh oysters with a few cloves, a little mace and nutmeg, some yolk o...
-Preserved Oysters
Open the oysters carefully, so as not to cut them except in dividing the gristle which attaches the shells; put them into a mortar, and when you have got as many as you can conveniently pound at once,...
-Oysters Scalloped
Oysters Scalloped (1) Put them, with their liquor strained, two or three blades of mace, a few peppercorns, a little cayenne, and a piece of butter the size of a walnut, kneaded with flour, into a st...
-Palates And Sweetbreads
Boil the palates till the black skin can be easily peeled off; parboil the sweetbreads with them; skin and cut the palates into pieces, and if the sweetbreads are large, cut them in two the long way; ...
-Panada
Panada (1) Boil some pieces of stale bread in a sufficient quantity of cold water to cover them, with a little cinnamon, lemon-peel, and caraways; when the bread is quite . soft, press out all the wa...
-Pancakes
Break three eggs in a basin; beat them up with a little nutmeg and salt; then put to them four ounces and a half of flour, and a little milk; beat it of a smooth batter; then add by degrees as much mi...
-Pannequets
Put into a pan, two ounces of sifted flour, four of powder-sugar, the same of bitter macaroons, and a spoonful of dried orange-flowers; break up all these articles, and mix with them the yolks often e...
-Parsley
To preserve parsley through the winter: - in May, June, or July, take fine fresh-gathered sprigs; pick, and wash them clean; set on a stewpan half full of water; put a little salt in it; boil, and ski...
-How To Boil Parsnips
Scrape and wash them nicely; when large, divide them; boil them in milk and water till quite tender; they will take nearly as long to boil as carrots. They may also be mashed like turnips. ...
-Partridges
How To Choose Partridges When they are young the bill is of a dark color, and their legs are of a yellowish color; and when fresh, the vent is firm, but this part will look greenish when stale. The p...
-Paste
Be very particular that your slab or paste table, rolling-pin and cutters are clean, and free from all old paste, and be very careful that both the flour and butter are extremely good. Have a dry siev...
-Paste. Continued
Paste For A Common Dumpling Rub into a pound of flour six ounces of butter, then work it into a paste with two well-beaten eggs and a little water. This paste may be baked, a large table-spoonful of ...
-Rice Paste
Rice Paste (1) Mix together half a pound of sifted ground rice and a quarter of a pound of fresh butter, work it into a paste with cold water, dredge flour over the paste-board and rolling-pin, roll ...
-Baked Pears
Baked Pears (1) Take twelve large baking pears; pare and cut them into halves, leaving the stem about half an inch long; take out the core with the point of a knife, and place them close together in ...
-Pears
Pears Compote Choose your fruit carefully, take off the tops, and trim the tails, wash and drain them well; then put them into a skillet with sugar, cinnamon, two or three cloves, a little red wine, ...
-Stewed Pears
Stewed Pears (1) Wash and prick some large stewing pears, and set them on the fire in a large stewing-pan of water to scald; when scalded, take them out, and put them on the fire in a pan with a suff...
-Peas
Peas, Green Young green peas, well dressed, are among the most delicious delicacies of the vegetable kingdom. They must be young; it is equally indispensable that they be fresh gathered, and cooked a...
-Pepper Pot
Take as much spinach as will fill a good sized dish, put it in a saucepan without any water, set it on the fire, and let it boil; then drain off all the liquor, chop the spinach very fine, and return ...
-Perch
Perch Boiled Put them into cold water, and let them boil carefully; serve with melted butter and soy. Perch Broiled Scrape, gut, and wash them; dry them in a cloth, dust them with flour, and broil ...
-Perlingo
Take a pound and a half of sifted flour, and having placed it on your slab, make a hole in the middle of it, into which put three-quarters of a pound of brown sugar, half a pound of fresh butter, the ...
-Perry
Perry is a pleasant and wholesome liquor, made from the juice of pears, by means of fermentation, somewhat in the same manner as cider is made from apples. ...
-Pettitoes
Boil the feet, the liver, and the heart, of a sucking pig, in a little water, very gently, then split the feet, and cut the meat very small, and simmer it with a little of the water till the feet are ...
-Pickle For Meat
Six pounds of salt, one pound of sugar, and four ounces of saltpetre, boiled with four gallons of water, skimmed, and allowed to cool, forms a very strong pickle, which will preserve any meat complete...
-Pickles
Pickles ought to be stored in a dry place and the vessels most approved of for keeping them in, are wide-mouthed glass bottles, or strong stone-ware jars, having corks or bungs, which must be fitted i...
-Apple Pie
Apple Pie (1) Take eight russe-tings, or lemon pippin apples; pare, core, and cut not smaller than quarters; place them as close as possible together into a pie-dish, with four cloves; rub together i...
-Meat Pies
Beef Kidney Pie Cut some kidneys into thin slices, and place them in the bottom of your pie-dish, then sweet herbs chopped, such as parsley, thyme, shallots, mushrooms, pepper, and salt; continue thi...
-Meat Pies. Part 2
Goose Pie Prepare a very strong raised crust, and make the sides thick and stiff. Take the bones out of a goose, turkey, and fowl, cutting each down the back; season them highly with pepper, salt, ma...
-Meat Pies. Part 3
Raised French Pie Make about two pounds of flour into a paste; knead it well, and into the shape of a ball; press your thumb into the centre, and work it by degrees into any shape (oval or round is t...
-Fish Pies
Cod Pie Lay a fine piece of fresh cod in salt for several hours, then wash it well, season it with pepper, salt, nutmeg and mace; place it in a dish, with a little butter and some good stock. Lay a c...
-Pies
Anglo-Francais Pie Take a deep dish, line the edge with puff paste like a common pie; stew a quarter of a pound of rice with some sugar until quite soft and sweet; take a pound of ripe juicy cherries...
-Mince Pies
Mince Pies (1) Carefully stone and cut, but not too small, one pound and a half of bloom raisins; cut small half a pound of orange-peel, mince finely half a dozen of middling-sized good apples, a qua...
-Vegetable Pies
Potato Pie Peel and slice your potatoes very thin into a pie-dish; between each layer of potatoes put a little chopped onion (three-quarters of an ounce of onion is sufficient for a pound of potatoes...
-Pig
Is in prime order for the spit when about three weeks old. It loses part of its goodness every hour after it is killed; if not quite fresh, no art can make the crackling crisp. To be in perfection, ...
-Pig. Continued
Barbicued Pig Scald, etc, a pig, of about nine or ten weeks old, the same as for roasting; make a stuffing with a few sage-leaves, the liver of the pig, and two anchovies boned, washed, and cut extre...
-Pig's Harslet
(1) Parboil the liver and lights, slice and fry them along with thin bits of bacon. Garnish with fried parsley. Pig's Harslet (2) Wash and dry some livers, sweetbreads, and some fat and lean pieces ...
-Pig's Head
Pig's Head Collared Very nicely scour the head and ears; take off the hair and snout, and take out the eyes and brain; let it lay for one night in water; then drain it; salt it extremely well, with c...
-Pig's Feet
Pig's Feet And Ears Pickled Wash the feet and ears very clean, and between every foot put a bay-leaf; when they are well soaked, add some cloves, mace, co riander-seed, and ginger; put a bottle of wh...
-Pigeons
Pigeons should be extremely fresh; when so, and in good order, they are plump and fat at the vent, and their feet pliable; but when they are stale, the vent is open, green, and withered. Tame pigeons ...
-Pigeon Stew
Stew Pigeons (1) Clean them nicely, truss them as for boiling, put into their in-sidesome pepper and salt; brown in a saucepan three ounces of butter with a table-spoonful of flour, add as much gravy...
-Pike
Baked Pike Scrape the scales off a large pike, take out the gills, and clean it, without breaking the skin; stuff the fish with a forcemeat made of two handfuls of grated bread, one of finely-minced ...
-How To Make Pillau
Wash very clean two pounds of rice, stew it till perfectly tender with a little water, half a pound of butter, some salt, whole pepper, cloves and mace, and keep the stewpan closely covered; boil two ...
-Plovers
How To Choose Plovers Choose them by the hardness of the vent, which shows that they are fat; and when new, they are limber-footed. In other respects, choose them by the same marks as other fowls. Th...
-Point De Jour Fritters
Mix with two handfuls of flour a glass of sweet wine, a table-spoonful of brand}', and warm milk, sufficient to make it into a paste; add the well-beaten whites of four eggs, a little minced citron, c...
-Poivrade
Put into a stewpan a large bunch of parsley-leaves, some scalRons, two bay-leaves, a little thyme, a dessertspoonful of fine white pepper, a glass of vinegar, and a small quantity of butter; set the p...
-Pork
Dairy-fed pork is the best; the flesh should look white and smooth, and the fat be white and fine. In preparing a hog for bacon, the ribs are cut, with a very little flesh on them, from the side, whic...
-Pork Spare Rib
Usually weighs about eight or nine pounds, and will take from two to three hours to roast it thoroughly; not exactly according to its weight, but the thickness of the meat upon it which varies very mu...
-Pork Cheese
Choose the head of a small pig which may weigh about twelve pounds the quarter. Sprinkle over it and the tongues of four pigs, a little common salt and a very little saltpetre. Let them lie four days,...
-Potatoes
The vegetable kingdom affords no food more wholesome, more easily procured, easily prepared, or less expensive, than the potato: yet, although this most useful vegetable is dressed almost every day, ...
-Potatoes. Continued
Potato Balls Ragout Are made by adding to a pound of potatoes a quarter of a pound of grated ham, or some sweet herbs, or chopped parsley, an onion or eschalot, salt, pepper, and a little grated nutm...
-Mashed Potatoes
Mashed Potatoes (1) When your potatoes are thoroughly boiled, drain them quite dry, pick out every speck, etc. and while hot, rub them through a colander into a clean stewpan. To a pound of potatoes ...
-Pot Pourri
Gather, when perfectly dry, a peck of roses; pick off the leaves, and strew over them three-quarters of a pound of common salt; let them remain two or three days, and if any fresh flowers are added, s...
-Potting Beef, Veal, Game, Or Poultry
Take three pounds of lean gravy beef, rub it well with an ounce of saltpetre, and then a handful of common salt; let it lie in salt for a couple of days, rubbing it well each day; then put it into an ...
-Poultry
In choosing a turkey, the young cock bird is to be preferred; the best have black legs, and if young, the toes and bill are pliable and feel soft. A hen turkey is chosen by the same rules. Fowls with...
-Sweetmeats, Preserves
All sweetmeats should be preserved in a brass pan, which must be well scoured with sand and vinegar, washed with hot water, and wiped perfectly dry before it is used. An iron plate or stove is prefer...
-How To Preserve Apples Without Sugar
Apples (1) Pare, cove, and quarter six pounds of good hard baking apples; finely pound four pounds of loaf sugar; put a layer of each alternately, with half a pound of the best white ginger, into a j...
-How To Preserve Fruit Without Sugar
Take damsons when not too ripe; pick off the stalks, and put them into wide-mouthed glass bottles, taking care not to put in any but what are whole, and without blemish; shake them well down (otherwis...
-How To Preserve Cucumbers Without Sugar
Take large and fresh-gathered cucumbers; split them down and take out all the seeds; lay them in salt and water that will bear an egg, three days; set them on a fire with cold water, and a small lump ...
-How To Preserve Damsons Without Sugar
Damsons (1) To every pound of damsons allow three-quarters of a pound of pounded loaf sugar; put into jars alternately a layer of damsons, and one of sugar tie them over with bladder or strong paper ...
-How To Preserve Gooseberries Without Sugar
Large Sweet Green Gooseberries (1) Weigh equal proportions of sugar and of fruit; with a penknife slit the gooseberries on one side, and take out all the seeds; put them into a preserving pan with co...
-How To Preserve Pears Without Sugar
Preserved Jargonelle Pears Gather pears with stalks before they are quite ripe; allow equal quantities of fine loaf sugar and of fruit. Pare the pears as thinly as possible, keeping on the stalks; ca...
-Pies, Tarts, Puddings
Great nicety is to be observed in preparing every material used for boiled or baked puddings. The eggs require to be well beaten, for which purpose, if many are to be done, a whisk is used; if tew, a...
-Apple Puddings
Apple (1) Weigh one pound and three-quarters of apples, pare, core, and cut them into thin bits; weigh also ten ounces of brown sugar; make a suet paste, rolled thinner towards the edges than in the ...
-Apple Pudding A La Francaise
To make the entremets properly, it is necessary to have a mould in the form of a dome four inches deep and six in diameter; this mould and its lid should be pierced all over, the same as a skimmer. Th...
-Beef-Steak Puddings
Beef-Steak Get rump-steaks, not too thick, beat them with a chopper, cut them into pieces about half the size of your hand, and trim off all the skin, sinews, etc.; have ready an onion peeled and cha...
-Lemon Puddings
Lemon (1) Peel four lemons thin; boil them till they are tender; rub them through a hair sieve, and preserve the fine pulp. Take a pound of Naples biscuits, a little grated nutmeg, and two ounces of ...
-Macaroni Puddings
Macaroni (1) Simmer half a pound of macaroni in plenty of water, and a table-spoonful of salt, till it is tender; but take care not to have it too soft; though tender, it should be firm, and the form...
-Plum Puddings
Plum (1) One pound of fresh beef suet, finely minced, one pound of raisins stoned, five table-spoonfuls of flour, five of brown sugar, five well-beaten yolks, and three whites of eggs, a tea-spoonful...
-Potato Puddings
Potato Pudding (1) Boil three large mealy potatoes,mash them very smoothly, with one ounce of butter, and two or three table-spoonfuls of thick cream; add three well-beaten eggs, a little salt, grate...
-Almond Puddings
Baked Almond Pudding Steep four ounces of crumbs of bread sliced in a pint and half of cream, or grate the bread; then beat half a pound of blanched almonds very fine, till they become a paste, with ...
-Puddings
Sweeten a pint and a half of cream, and boil it with the peel of a small lemon; cut the crumb of a twopenny roll, an put it into the cream, and boil it for eignt minutes, stirring constantly; when thi...
-Puddings. Part 2
Camp Pudding Put into a saucepan half a pint of water, a quarter of a pound of butter, a table-spoonful of brown sugar, add the peel of half a lemon or orange. Let it just come to a boil, take it off...
-Puddings. Part 3
Cranberry Pudding Stir into a quart of batter, made suffer than for batter pudding, about a pint of cranberries, and boil as usual. Or, make a paste as for apple pudding, and put in the cranberries, ...
-Puddings. Part 4
Boiled Gooseberry Pudding This pudding is made in the same manner as Apple pudding. Jelly Pudding Beat to a light cream ten ounces of fresh butter, then add by de- grees six well-beaten yolks of eg...
-Puddings. Part 5
Nassau Pudding Put into a saucepan the whole yolks of eight, and the whites of four eggs, half a pound of pounded loaf sugar, and one pound of fresh butter; stir it over a slow fire for nearly half a...
-Puddings. Part 6
Peas Put a quart of split peas to soak for two hours into warm water; boil them in soft water, with a bit of butter, till sufficiently tender to press through a sieve; pulp them, and add the beaten y...
-Puddings. Part 7
Tansy Pudding Pour over a thick slice of the crumb of bread a quart of boiling milk; cover it till cold. Beat the yolks of four and the whites of two eggs. Pound some tansy with two or three leaves o...
-Puddings. Part 8
Yorkshire Under Roast Meat Pudding This pudding is an especially excellent accompaniment to a sirloin of beef, - loin of veal, - or any fat and juicy joint. Six table-spoonfuls of flour, three eggs, ...
-Rich Ground Rice Puddings
Rich. Ground Rice (1) Stir into a quarter of a pound of ground rice, a pint and a half of new milk; put it into a saucepan, and keep stirring it till it boils; then add three ounces of melted butter,...
-Rice Puddings
Baked Or Boiled Rice Wash in cold water and pick very clean six ounces of rice, put it in a quart stewpan three parts filled with cold water, set it on the fire, and let it boil five minutes; pour aw...
-Sago Puddings
Sago (1) Boil five table-spoonfuls of sago, well picked and washed, in a quart of water, also half the peel of a lemon, and a stick of cinnamon; when it is rather thick, add half a pint of white wine...
-Salt Pudding
Salt, moderately used, especially with flesh, fish, butter, and cheese, is very beneficial, as it naturally stimulates weak or disordered stomachs, and checks fermentations. But if it be immoderately ...
-Suet Puddings
Suet, Wiggy's Way Suet, a quarter of a pound; flour, three table-spoonfuls; eggs, two; and a little grated ginger; milk, half a pint. Mince the suet as fine as possible, roll it with the rolling-pin ...
-Suet Or Dumplings
Chop six ounces of suet very fine; put it in a basin with six ounces of flour, two ounces of bread crumbs, and a tea-spoonful of salt stir it all well together: beat two eggs on a plate, add to them s...
-Puffs
Puffs (1) Roll out puff paste nearly a quarter of an inch thick, and, with a small saucer, or tin cutter of that size, cut it into round pieces: place upon one side raspberry or strawberry jam, or an...
-Quails
Hunters Quails Put the quails in a saucepan, with a little butter, a bay-leaf, sweet herbs, salt and pepper; set them on a fierce fire, and keep shaking them until they are tender, when add a dessert...
-Queer's Potage
Draw, wash, and clean three chickens, or young fowls, put them into a stewpan, with a bunch of parsley and some well-seasoned boiling veal stock; let it stew for an hour; take out the fowls, and pound...
-Queen Or Heart Cakes
One pound of sifted sugar, one pound of butter, eight eggs, one pound and a quarter of flour, two ounces of currants, and half a nutmeg grated. Cream the butter, and mix it well with the sugar and spi...
-Queen's Drops
Leave out four ounces of flour from the last receipt, and add two ounces more of currants, and two ounces of candied peel, cut small - work it the same as in the last receipt, and when ready put the m...
-Quince
Quince Compote Take six quinces, cut them in halves, and core them; scald and pare them neatly. Put some clear sirup into a preserving-pan, with the juice of a lemon; when hot, add the quinces, and g...
-Quintessence Of Anchovy
The goodness of this preparation depends almost entirely on having fine mellow fish, that have been in pickle long enough (i. e. about twelve months) to dissolve easily, yet are not at all rusty. Cho...
-Rabbits
Rabbits (1) Truss your rabbits short, lay them in a basin of warm water for ten minutes, then put them into plenty of water, and boil them about half an hour; if large ones, three-quarters; if very o...
-Rabbits. Part 2
Minced Rabbit Take the remains of a roasted rabbit, cut off all the meat, and mince it with a little roast mutton. Then break the bones of the rabbit into small pieces, and put them into a stewpan, w...
-Rabbits. Part 3
Roasted Rabbits Truss them for roasting, and stuff them with the liver minced raw, grated bread, and ham, butter or suet, and chopped parsley, seasoned with a little lemon thyme, grated nutmeg, salt,...
-Rabbit Pie
Cut a couple of young rabbits into quarters, and bruise a quarter of a pound of bacon in a mortar, with the livers, some pepper, salt, a little mace, pars-lev, cut small, and a few leaves of sweet bas...
-Ragout Of Snipes
Pick six or eight snipes very nicely, but do not wash them; take out the inside. Roast the birds, and cut off all the meat from the breasts, in thin slices; pound the bones, legs, and backs, in a mort...
-Ragout Of Cold Veal
Either a neck, loin, or fillet of veal, will furnish this excellent ragout with a very little expense or trouble. Cut the veal into handsome cutlets; put a piece of butter or clean dripping into a fry...
-Ramequins
Take a quarter of a pound of Cheshire cheese, scraped, the same quantity of Gloucester cheese, and beat them in a mortar, with a quarter of a pound of fresh butter, the yolks of four eggs, and the ins...
-Raspberry Dishes
Raspberry Dumplings Take some good puff paste, roll it out, and spread raspberry jam over it; roll it up, and boil it rather more than an hour; cut it into five slices; pour melted butter into the di...
-Red Mullet
Scrape and wash them, fold them in buttered paper, lay them into a dish, and bake them gently. The liquor that comes from them, boil with a piece of butter, dusted with flour, a tea-spoonful of soy, t...
-Relish For Chops, Etc
Pound fine an ounce of black pepper, and half an ounce of allspice, with an ounce of salt, and half an ounce of scraped horseradish, and the same of eschalots, peeled and quartered; put these ingredie...
-Indian Remoulade
Pound the yolks often hard eggs to a paste, dilute it with eight spoonfuls of oil, put in one at a time, and continue pounding all the time; then add about a dozen allspice, a tea-spoonful of saffron,...
-Rennet
Rennet (1) As soon as the calf is killed, take out the stomach, and scour it inside and out with salt, after it is cleared of the curd always found in it. Let it drain for a few hours, after which se...
-Spring Fruit Dishes
A Mock Gooseberry Sauce for Mackerel, etc. Make a marmalade of three dozen sticks of rhubarb, sweetened with moist sugar; pass it through a hair sieve, and serve up in a sauce-boat. Spring Fruit Tart...
-Rice Casserole
Take a pound and a half of rice, wash it thoroughly in several waters (warm), and then put it into a saucepan, at least eight inches in diameter; moisten it with stock, in this proportion; if the rice...
-Rice Dishes
How To Boil Rice Wash the rice perfectly clean, and put on one pound in two quarts of cold water; let it boil twenty minutes, strain it through a sieve, and put it before the fire; shake it up with a...
-Rice Dishes. Continued
Rice Custards Without Cream One tea-spoonfu-I of rice-flour, a pint of new milk, the yolks of three eggs, a table-spoonful of ratafia (or two or three laurel leaves boiled in), sugar to your taste; m...
-Rice Flummery
Rice Flummery (1) Boil a pint of new milk, with a bit of lemon-peel and cinnamon: then mix just sufficient rice-flour, with a little cold milk as will make the whole of a good consistence, sweeten ac...
-Rice Soup
Rice Soup (1) Carefully blanch some well picked rice, then drain it on a sieve; put about a tea-cupful in the soup-pot, with one head of celery, and a quart of consomme, and let it simmer by the side...
-Rissoles
Rissoles (1) Cut puff paste with a round tin cutter, about three inches wide; have ready some cold fowl or veal, very finely minced, and seasoned with a little pounded garlic, grated lemon-peel, pepp...
-French Rolls
French Rolls (1) Mix rather more than an ounce of coarse salt with eight pounds of sifted flour; make a hole in the middle, and pour in about half a pint of good yeast, the well-beaten whites of four...
-Rolls
Three pints of flour, sifted. Two tea-spoonfuls of salt. Four table-spoonfuls of the best brewer's yeast, or six of home-made yeast. A pint of hike-warm water. Half a pint more of warm water, and a ...
-Rose-Water
Rose-Water Double-Distilled The rose generally chosen for this purpose, is the common pale (single or double) rose, but the white rose is best of all. Gather the flowers in fine weather, two hours af...
-Roux
Put a pound of butter into a saucepan, shake it about til! dissolved, when add a sufficient quantity of sifted flour, to make it the consistence of thick bouilli; then set it over a fierce stove, and ...
-Sage Gargle
Boil quickly in a pint of water, a large handful of sage leaves; cover the pan closely, and when reduced to one-half, strain it; when cold, mix it with the same quantity of Port wine and of vinegar; s...
-Sago
Let it soak for an hour in cold water, to take off the earthy taste; pour that off, and wash it well; then add more water, and simmer gently until the berries are clear, with lemon-peel and spice. Add...
-Salad Mixture
Endeavor to have your salad herbs as fresh as possible; if you suspect they are not morning gathered, they will be much refreshed by lying an hour or two in spring water; then carefully wash and pic...
-Saline Draught
Salt of wormwood, twenty grains; lemon-juice, a table-spoonful; water, two table-spoonfuls; magnesia, twenty grains; mix it in a tumbler, together with a little pounded sugar, and take two or three of...
-Sally Lunns
Take three quarts of dried flour, half a cupful of yeast, a quarter of a pound of butter, melted in a sufficient quantity of milk to dissolve it, the yolks of three eggs, and a little salt: make these...
-Salmon
When salmon is fresh and good, the gills and flesh are of a bright red, the scales clear, and the whole fish is stiff. When just killed, there is a whiteness between the flakes, which gives great firm...
-Salmon. Continued
Boiled Receipt By An Aberdeen Fisherman Salmon When the water is hot, put salt into it, and stir it well; taste it; when strong enough to force you to cast it from your mouth, it will do; when the wa...
-Pickled Salmon
Pickled Salmon (1) Cut a salmon into two or three pieces, put it in a fish-kettle, and set it on the fire with a sufficient quantity of water to cover it, and plenty of salt; as soon as it begins to ...
-Pickled Salmon, Mackerel, Sprats, Herrings
Cut the fish into proper pieces; do not take off the scales; make a brine strong enough to bear an egg, in which boil the fish; it must be boiled in only just liquor enough to cover it; do not overboi...
-Salpicon
This is a mixture composed of various articles, such as sweetbreads, fat livers, tongue, ham, champignons, truffles, etc, previously dressed, cut into dice, and cooked in some rich sauce, and seasoned...
-Salt
Is as Plutarch calls it, sauce for sauce. Common salt is more relishing than basket salt; it should be prepared for the table by diving it in a Dutch oven before the fire; then put it on a clean pape...
-Samphire
How To Dry, Or Preserve Samphire Take it in bunches as it grows; set a large deep stewpan full of water on the fire; as soon as it boils, throw in a little salt, and put in the samphire; when it look...
-Sandwiches
Sandwiches (1) Cut some bread into thin slices, pare off the crust, and spread a little butter on them; cut them nicely into oblong pieces, put between each some bits of fowl, and then thin bits of h...
-Apple Sauce
Apple (1) Pare, core, and slice some apples; boil them in water, with a bit of lemon-peel; when tender, mash them, add to them a bit of butter the size of a walnut, and some brown sugar. Heat, and se...
-Beef-Gravy Or Brown Sauce For Ragout, Game, Poultry, Fish, Etc
If you want gravy immediately, see Potato Soup, or Glaze. If you have time enough, furnish a thick and well-tinned stewpan with a thin slice of sail pork, or an ounce of butter, and a middling-sized o...
-Bread Sauce
Bread Sauce (1) Boil, in a pint of water, the crumb of a French roll or of a slice of bread, a minced onion, and some whole pepper. When the onion is tender, drain off the water, pick out the pepperc...
-Egg Sauce
Egg Sauce (1) This agreeable accompaniment to roasted poultry, or salted fish, is made by putting three eggs into boiling water, and boiling them for about twelve minutes, when the}' will be hard; pu...
-Sauce For Fish
Sauce For Fish (1) The melted butter for fish, should be thick enough to adhere to the fish, and, therefore, must be of the thickness of light batter, as it is to be diluted with essence of anchovy, ...
-Onion Sauces
White Onion Sauce The following is a more mild and delicate preparation: take half a dozen of the largest and whitest onions (the Spanish are the mildest, but these can only be had from August to De-...
-Mushroom Sauce
Pick and peel lialf a pint of mushrooms (the smaller the better); wash them very clean, and put them into a saucepan, with half a pint of veal gravy or milk, a little pepper and salt, and an ounce of ...
-Lobster Sauce
Lobster Sauce (1) Bruise the body, add it. to some thick melted butter; pull the flesh into small bits, and mix all together with some rich beef gravy; boil it up, and before serving add a little sal...
-Salad Sauces
Salad Sauce (1) Bruise the yolk of a hard-boiled egg with a small tea-spoonful of salt, then add a dessert-spoonful of mustard, and stir in gradually a large table-spoonful of olive oil, oiled butter...
-Shallots Sauce
Shallot Sauce (1) Boil a few minced shallots in a little clear gravy and nearly as much vinegar, add a few peppercorns and a little salt. Strain, and serve it in a sauce-tureen. Shallot Sauce (2) T...
-Shrimp Sauce
Shrimp Sauce (1) Pick some shrimps nicely from the shell, put them into melted butter, add a table-spoonful of lemon pickle and vinegar; heat it. Shrimp Sauce (2) Shell a pint of shrimps; pick them...
-Sauce For Hashes Of Mutton Or Beef
Unless you are quite sure you perfectly understand the palate of those you are working for, show those who are to eat the hash this receipt, and beg of them to direct you how they wish it seasoned. H...
-Lemon And Liver Sauce
Lemon Sauce Pare a lemon, and cut it into slices twice as thick as a half-crown piece; divide these into dice, and put them into a quarter of a pint of melted butter. Some cooks mince a bit of the le...
-Sauce For Roast Beef
Sauce For Roast Beef (1) Mix well together a large table-spoonful of finely-grated horseradish, a dessert-spoonful of made mustard, and half a one of brown sugar, then add vinegar till little as thic...
-Piquant Sauce For Cold Meat, Game, Poultry, Fish, Etc. Or Salads
Piquant Sauce Put a little chopped shallot and a few spoonfuls of gravy into a saucepan; let it boil till the gravy be nearly boiled away, but not burned to the bottom of the saucepan; add as much br...
-Sorrel Sauce
Sorrel Sauce (1) Pick and wash some sorrel, put it into a stewpan with a little water, stir it, to prevent its burning, and when it is tender, drain and mince it finely; fry it for half an hour in a ...
-Claret or Superlative Sauce
Port wine, and mushroom ketchup, a pint of each. Haifa pint of walnut or other pickle liquor. Pounded anchovies, four ounces. Fresh lemon-peel, pared very thin, an ounce. Peeled and sliced eschalots, ...
-Sauce
Sauce (1) Few things require more care than making sauces, as most of them should be stirred constantly, the whole attention should be directed to them; the better way therefore, is to prepare the sa...
-Sauce. Continued
Sauce For Boiled Meat Game, And Poultry Bruise the yolks of two hard-boiled eggs with a little water and salt; bone one anchovy, and mince it, a small onion, two shallots, a little parsley and tarrag...
-Dutch Sauce
Dutch Sauce (1) Beat up the yolks of six eggs, mix in a little flour, cream, salt, and lemon vinegar. Strain it through a sieve, add a small piece of fresh butter, two blades of pounded mace, and a l...
-Dutch Sauce. Part 2
Grande Sauce Take three or four slices from the under part of a knuckle of veal, and put them into a large stewpan with two ladlefuls of consomme, set it on a fierce fire, taking care to skim it as m...
-Dutch Sauce. Part 3
Kelly's Piquante Sauce Pound a table-spoonful of capers, and one of minced parsley, as fine as possible; then add the yolks of three hard eggs, rub them well together with a table-spoonful of mustard...
-Dutch Sauce. Part 4
Pudding Sauce Mix with half a pint of melted butter two wine-glasses of sherry, and a table-spoonful of pounded loaf sugar; make it quite hot, and serve in a sauce-tureen, with grated nutmeg on the t...
-White Sauces
Thicken half a pint of cream with a little flour and butter, four shallots minced, a little mace and lemon-peel; let it boil, and a little before serving, add a spoonful of white wine, the well-beaten...
-Wow Wow Sauce For Stewed Or Bouilli Beef
Chop some parsley-leaves very fine; quarter two or three pickled cucumbers, or walnuts, and divide them into small squares, and set them by ready: put into a saucepan a bit of butter as big as an egg;...
-Sausages
Sausages (1) Are composed of va-'rious kinds of meat, chopped exceedingly small, with pounded spices, and aromatic herbs, shred fine; these ingredients are put into skins, or guts (thoroughly washed)...
-Sausages. Continued
Bologna Sausages Take the legs and shoulders of a pig, from which cut all the lean, scrape it well, remove all the sinews, and rub the meat well with a seasoning made of salt, pepper, coriander, clov...
-Scotch
Scotch Barley Broth Agood and substantial dinner for sixpence per head. Wash three-quarters of a pound of Scotch barley in a little cold water; put it in a soup-pot with a shin or leg of. beef, of ab...
-Boiled Sea Cale
Let it lie sometime in cold water, then clean and trim it nicely, cutting oil any part that may be at all green, and parting it as little as possible. Put it on in boiling water, with a little salt. L...
-Seed Cake
Sift two and a half pounds of flour, with half a pound of good white or loaf sugar, pounded into a pan or bowl; make a cavity in the centre, and pour in half a pint of lukewarm milk, and a table-spoon...
-Sheep's Tongues
Broiled Sheep's Tongues Having parboiled the tongues in a little stock, split each, give them a few turns in some melted bacon, strewing over them salt, pepper, shred parsley, and bread crumbs; when ...
-Sheep
Broiled Sheep's Kidneys Wash and dry some nice kidneys, cut them in half and with a small skewer keep them open in imitation of two shells, season them with salt and pepper, and dip them into a littl...
-Sheep's Trotters
Sheep's Trotters Stuffed Boil the feet in good stock till the bones will come out with ease; fill the space left by them with a good fowl or chicken farce; dip them in lard, bread them well, and bake...
-Sherbet
This is a delicious beverage, composed of cream, mixed with various articles, such as almonds, tea, pistachios, coffee, chocolate, etc, and sugar, and then iced. Sherbet may also be made with the juic...
-Shrubs
Shrub (1) One measure of lemon-juice is allowed to five of rum, and to every gallon of the mixture, six. pounds of loaf sugar, which is to be melted in water, and the whole strained through flannel. ...
-Sirups
Sirup Of Currants, Raspberries Or Mulberries Pick the fruit from the stalks; squeeze the juice, and let it stand ten days or a fortnight, or till the fermentation ceases, which may be known by the sc...
-Skates
Fried Skate After you have cleaned the fish, divide it into fillets; dry them on a clean cloth; beat the yolk and white of an egg thoroughly together, dip the fish in this, and then in fine bread-cru...
-Skirrets
Wash and scrape them, put them on in boiling water, and boil them for ten minutes; dry them in a cullender, and fry them brown in a little butter. They are sometimes plain boiled, and a little melted ...
-Smelts
How To Fry Smelts This delicate little fish, when perfectly fresh, must not be washed, but wiped with a clean cloth, and dredged with flour, or brushed over with a feather, dipped into the yolk of an...
-Snipes
When the snipes have been picked, they must be singed over a charcoal fire; in trussing them press the legs close to the side, and pierce the beak through them; tie a slice of bacon over each bird, ru...
-Snow-Balls, Boiled In Butter
Mix with six well-beaten eggs one pint and a half of sour cream, and add by degrees as much flour as will make the batter thick enough for the spoon to stand in it; sweeten it with brown sugar, and pu...
-Snow Cheese
Sweeten, with pounded loaf sugar, a quart of good cream; add the strained juice of three lemons, and one ounce and a half of blanched sweet almonds pounded, and two table-spoonfuls of rose-water, and ...
-Soda Water
Tartaric acid half an ounce, arated soda, half an ounce. Have two tumblers about one-third full of water, put a tea-spoonful of the soda into one glass, and the same of the acid into the other; when d...
-How To Fry Soles Or Other Fish
An hour before you intend to dress them, wash them dioroughly, and wrap them in a clean cloth, to make them perfectly dry, or the bread-crumbs will not stick to them. Prepare some bread-crumbs, by ru...
-Soles
How To Boil Soles A fine, fresh, thick sole is almost as good eating as a turbot. Wash and clean it nicely; put it into a fish-kettle with a handful of salt, and as much cold water as will cover it; ...
-Sorrel
How To Stew Sorrel Strip the leaves from the stalks, wash them well, scald them in boiling water in a silver saucepan, or in an earthern pipkin; strain and stew them in a little gravy till tender. Se...
-Soufflet
Apple Soufflet Prepare apples as for baking in a pudding, put them into a deep dish, and lay upon the top, about an inch' and a half thick, rice boiled in new milk with sugar; beat to a stiff froth t...
-Clear Gravy Soup
Cut half a pound of ham into slices, and lay them at the bottom of a large stewpan or stockpot, with two or three pounds of lean beef, and as much veal; break the bones, and lay them on the meat; take...
-Lobster Soups
Lobster Soup (1) Cut small a dozen of common-sized onions, put them into a stewpan with a small bit of butter, a slice or two of lean ham, and a slice of lean beef; when the onions are quite soft, mi...
-Macaroni Soups
Macaroni Soup (1) Boil for three hours very quickly, in five quails of water, seven pounds of veal, a little salt, a dessertspoonful of white pepper, and three or four blades of mace; strain it oft',...
-Mock Turtle Soup
Endeavor to have the head and the broth ready for the soup, the day before it is to be eaten. It will take eight hours to prepare it properly. hours. Cleaning and soaking the head...
-Mock Mock Turtle
Line the bottom of a stewpan that will hold five pints, with an ounce of nice lean bacon or ham, a pound and a half of lean gravy beef, a cow-heel, the inner rind of a carrot, a sprig of lemon thyme, ...
-Mullagatawny Soups
Mullagatawny Soup (1) Put half a pound of fresh butter, with six large onions sliced, three cloves of garlic, some chopped parsley, and sweet marjoram, into a stewpan, let it stew over a slow fire ti...
-Cressy Soups
Cressy Soup (1) Wash clean, and cut small, eight carrots, eight turnips, three heads of celery, and six onions; put them in a stewpan with a quarter of a pound of butter and a slice of ham, stew them...
-Mock Turtle Or Calf's Head Soups
Or Mock Turtle Soup Calf's Head (1) Parboil a calf's head, take off the skin and cut it in bits about an inch and a half square, cut the fleshy parts in bits, take out the black part of the eyes, and...
-Brown Gravy Soup
Brown Gravy Soup (1) Take fifteen pounds of a leg or shin of beef, cut off the meat in bits, rub the bottom of the pot with butter, put in the meat, let it brown for nearly an hour, turning it consta...
-Maigre Or Vegetable Gravy Soup
Put into a gallon stewpan three ounces of butter; set it over a slow fire; while it is melting, slice four ounces of onion; cut in small pieces one turnip, one carrot, and a head of celery; put them i...
-Beef Soups
Beef Soup, Thick In eight quarts of water boil gently for seven hours, skimming it well, a shin, or a leg of beef, and a bunch of sweet herbs; strain it the next day, take off the fat, and cut all th...
-Fish Soups
Eel Soup To make a tureenful, take a couple of middling-sized onions, cut them in half, and cross your knife over them two or three times; put two ounces of butter into a stewpan, when it is melted p...
-Ox-Head Soup
Should be prepared the day before it is to be eaten, as you cannot cut the meat off the head into neat mouthfuls unless it is cold: therefore, the day before you want this soup, put half an ox-cheek i...
-Vegetable Soups
Asparagus Soup This is made with the points of asparagus, in the same manner as the green pease soup is with pease: let half the asparagus be rubbed through a sieve, and the other cut in pieces about...
-Vegetable Soups. Continued
Herb Soup Wash and cut small twelve cabbage lettuces, a handful of chervil, one of purslane, one of parsley, eight large green onions, and three handfuls of sorrel; when pease are in season omit half...
-Bouilli
The best parts for this purpose, are the leg or shin, or a piece of the middle of a brisket of beef, of about seven or eight pounds' weight; lay it on a fish drainer, or when you take it up, put a sli...
-Ox-Heel Soup
Must be made the day before it is to be eaten. Procure an by-heel undressed, or only scalded, and two that have been boiled as they usually are a the tripe shops. Cut the meat off the boiled heels in...
-Ox-Tail Soup
Three tails, costing about 2d. each, will make a tureen of soup (desire the butcher to divide them at the joints); lay them to soak in warm water, while you get ready the vegetables. Put. into a gall...
-Green Peas Soups
Green Peas Soup (1) A peck of peas will make you a good tureen of soup. In shelling them, put the old ones in one basin, and the young ones in another, and keep out a pint of them, and boil them sepa...
-Old Peas Soups
Old Peas Soup (1) Put a pound and a half of split peas on in four quarts of water, with roast beef or mutton bones, and a ham bone, two heads of celery, and four onions, let them boil till the peas b...
-Pigeon Soups
Pigeon Soup (1) Have a strong beef stock, highly seasoned, and if for rich soup, take six or eight pigeons according to their size, wash them clean, cut off the necks, pinions, livers and gizzards, a...
-Soups
Every utensil employed in a kitchen must be kept scrupulously clean, and a cook ought to take especial care that all her saucepans be in good older. Brass pans are preferable for preserving in, and do...
-Soups. Part 2
Giblet Soup Clean very nicely two sets of giblets, parboil them. Take the skin off the feet; cut the gizzards in quarters, the necks in three bits, the feet, pinions, and livers, in two, the head in ...
-Soups. Part 3
Moor-Fowl Soup It may be made with or without brown gravy soup; when with the former, six birds are suffi-cient, when with moor-fowl only, boil five in four quarts of water, pound the breasts in a mo...
-Sante Soups
Sante Soup (1) Peel four large onions, cut them small, with four white lettuces, a handful of spinach, and a slice of grated bread. Stew all these ingredients for an hour in a quart of broth and a qu...
-Winter Vegetable Soups
Winter Vegetable Soup (1) Peel and slice six large onions, six potatoes, and four turnips; fry them in half a pound of butter or very fresh dripping; toast a crust of bread brown and hard, put it, wi...
-Venison Soups
Boil down in five quarts of water two pounds of a shank of veal, or fowl, and five pounds of the breast of venison cut small; two or three onions chopped, some whole white pepper and salt, with a quar...
-White Soups
White Soup (1) Boil together a knuckle of veal, a fowl, or two chickens skinned, a carrot, a turnip, an onion, some salt, and a little whole white pepper; take out the chickens when tender, cut them ...
-Sour Krout With Pike
When the krout is boiled, clean a large pike, scrape and cut it into neat pieces, dip them into the beaten yolk of an egg, then into bread crumbs, and fry them of a nice brown; rub some butter upon a ...
-Spinach
How To Dress Spinach Pick the spinach with great care; strip the leaves from the stalks, and wash it in several waters, till perfectly clean; boil the spinach in salt and water; drain it well; pound ...
-Sprats
How To Bake Sprats Clean them; take off the heads; put them into a deep dish, and cover them with vinegar and water, equal quantities of each. To a quart of liquid, put half an ounce of whole black p...
-Soup Stock
Stock For Brown Or White Soups Take a pound of scate, five flounders, and two pounds of eels; cut them in pieces, put them into a stewpan, with as much water as will cover them, a little mace, an oni...
-Stomachic Tincture
Peruvian bark, bruised, one ounce and a half, orange-peel, do. one ounce, brandy, or proof spirit, one pint. Let these ingredients steep for ten days, shaking the bottle every day; let it remain quiet...
-Strawberry Dishes
Strawberry Cream Put six ounces of strawberry jam to a pint of cream, pulp it through a sieve; add to it the juice! of a lemon, whisk it fast at the edge of a dish, lay the froth on a sieve, add a li...
-Stuffing
Stuffing Without Meat Season a quarter of a pound of finely-minced beef suet, and an equal quantity of grated bread, with grated nutmeg, lemon-peel, lemon thyme, and parsley, salt, and pepper; mix it...
-Sturgeon
Baked Sturgeon Clean, and take the skin from a small sturgeon; split it along the belly, without separating it. Lay it in a large baking dish, season it with salt, pepper, pounded sweet herbs; moiste...
-Sugar
Sugar used in moderation is nourishing and good, but much of it destroys the appetite, and injures the digestion. Moist sugar is the sweetest, and most opening; refined sugar, of a binding nature. The...
-Sweetbreads
Sweetbreads, Italian Attelets Blanch some nice sweetbreads, and stew them in a well-seasoned gravy, made of meat and vegetables; when cold, cut them into pieces of nearly an inch square, put them int...
-Syllabub
Syllabubs Take the juice of a large lemon, the,peel (pared very thin), a glass of brandy, two of white wine, and a quarter of a pound of powder-sugar; put these ingredients into a pan, and leave them...
-Tartlets
Tartlets (1) Butter some small tartlet pans; line them with a nice thin puff paste, mark it neatly round the edges, bake them; when they are cold, till them with custard, preserve, or any sweetmeat y...
-Tarts
Royal Berlin Tarte Take half a pound of sweet almonds, and having blanched, pound them with six eggs, in a marble mortar to a very fine paste, add to it a pound of broken sugar, a pound of fresh butt...
-Tea Cream
Infuse an ounce of the best green tea in half a pint of boiling milk, simmer it five minutes, then strain it through a tammy, pressing the leaves well. Boil a pint of rich cream, add to it the yolks ...
-Roasted Teal
Shred a little lemon-peel, and mix it with a bit of butter, salt, pepper, and lemon-juice; stuff your birds with this, cover them first with slices of lemon, then bacon, and lastly, buttered paper spr...
-Tench
They are a fine-flavored fresh water fish; when good, the eyes are bright, the body stiff, and the outside free from slime; tench should be dressed as soon as caught. Tench, Fried Take a couple of l...
-Tewahdiddle
A pint of table beer (or ale, if you intend it for a supplement to your night cap), a table-spoonful of brandy, and a tea-spoonful of brown sugar, or clarified sirup; a little grated nutmeg or ginge...
-Thickening
Clarified butter is best for this purpose; but if you have none ready, put some fresh butter into a stewpan over a slow, clear fire; when it is melted, add fine flour sufficient to make it the thickne...
-Timbale
Put a pound of flour on the slab, make a hole in the middle of it, into which pour a little water, three or four spoonfuls of oil, a quarter of a pound of butter, the yolks of two eggs, and a pinch of...
-Tincture Of Allspice
Of allspice bruised, three ounces, apothecaries' weight; brandy, a quart. Let it steep a fortnight, occasionally shaking it up; then pour off' the clear liquor: it is a most grateful addition in all c...
-Tipsy Cake
Pour over a sponge cake, made in the form of a porcupine, as much white wine as it will absorb, and stick it all over with blanched sweet almonds, cut like straws; or pour wine in the same manner over...
-Toasts
With Butter Toast Spread butter over some slices of fried bread; lav on them sweet herbs, tossed up in melted butter, and serve. Genoa Toasts Lard a French roll with partly anchovies, and partly ha...
-Tomato Sauces
Tomato Sauce Bake six tomatoe in an oven till quite soft; with a tea-spoor take out the pulp, add salt, cayenne, and vinegar, till of the consistence of thick cream, French Tomato Sauce Cut ten or ...
-Method Of Preserving Tomatoes
Method Of Preserving Tomatoes (1) A sufficient quantity of salt is dissolved in spring or river water to make it strong enough to bear an egg; select perfectly ripe tomatoes, and place them well and ...
-Tongue
Tongue (1) A tongue which has not been dried will require very little soak-ing, but if dried, it should be soaked as water for three or four hours; then put a into cold water, and let it boil gently ...
-Trifle
Trifle (1) Add to a pint of rich cream a tea-cupful of white wine, sweeten it with pounded loaf sugar, whisk it well, and as the froth rises lay it upon a sieve placed over a deep dish; as it drains,...
-Tripe
Take care to have fresh tripe; cleanse it well from the fat, and cut it into pieces about two inches broad and four long; put it into a stewpan, and cover it with milk and water, and let it boil gentl...
-Trout
This fish is held in great estimation, it is a fresh water fish, and when good, of a flesh color, and the spots upon it are very bright; the female is considered the best, and is known by the head bei...
-Truffles
The truffle, like the mushroom, is a species of fungus common in France and Italy; it generally grows about eight or ten inches below the surface of the ground; as it imparts a most delicious flavor, ...
-Tunbridge Cakes
Rub two ounces of butter into half a pound of dried flour; add a few caraway seeds, and a quarter of a pound of pounded loaf sugar; mix it to a stiff paste with a little water, roll out very thin, cut...
-How To Boil Turbot
How To Boil (1) Turbot This excellent fish is in season the greatest part of the summer; when good, it is at once firm and tender, and abounds with rich gelatinous nutriment. Being drawn,.and washed...
-Turbot
Turbot, when good, should be thick and full, and the belly of a yellowish while or cream color. Baked Turbot Wash your fish in several waters, dry it well, and soak it in melted butter, with sweet h...
-Turkey, Turkey Poults, And Other Poultry
A fowl and a turkey require the same management at the fire, only the latter will take longer time. Many a Christmas dinner has been spoiled by the turkey having been hung up in a cold larder, and be...
-Turkey
Boiled Turkey Make a stuffing of bread, herbs, salt, pepper, nutmeg, lemon-peel, a few oysters, or an anchovy, a bit of butter, some suet, and an egg; put this into the crop, fasten up the skin, and ...
-Hashed Turkey
Hashed Turkey (1) Cut up the remains of a roasted turkey, put it into a stewpan, with a glass of white wine, chopped parsley, shallots, mushrooms, truffles, salt and pepper, two spoonfuls of cullis, ...
-Turnips
How To Dress Young White Turnips Wash, peel, and boil them till tender in water with a little salt; serve them with melted butter poured over them. Or, They may be stewed in a pint of milk thickened ...
-Turtle Soup
Turtle Soup (1) To dress a Turtle weighing one hundred and twenty pounds. Having cut off the head close to the shell, hang up the turtle till the next day, then open it, bearing the knife heavily on ...
-Stewed Veal Breast
Stewed Veal Breast (1) Half roast the veal till of a light brown, then stew it over a stove for two hours, in a rich gravy, with a shallot, three cloves, a blade of mace, a little walnut pickle, some...
-Veal
The names of the joints are as follows: Loin, best end - Loin, chump end - Fillet - Hind Knuckle - Fore knuckle - Neck, best end - Neck, scrag end - Blade bone - Breast, best end - Brisket end. Veal ...
-Veal. Part 2
Broiled Veal Breast Half roast and then score it; season it with parsley, a few finely-minced sweet herbs, a little pepper and salt, and broil it. Make a sauce with some gravy seasoned with onion, gr...
-Veal. Part 3
Veal Cake To Be Eaten Cold Pound in a mortar as much cold roasted lean veal as will fill a small mould, together with a slice of ham, or bacon, a piece of the crumb of bread soaked in cold milk, two ...
-Veal. Part 4
Fillet, Stewed Veal Bone, lard, and stuff a fillet of veal; half roast, and then stew it with two quarts of white stock, a tea-spoonful of lemon pickle and one of mushroom ketchup. Before serving, st...
-Veal. Part 5
Minced Veal Cut thin slices of lean cold veal; mince them very finely with a knife, and season with pepper, salt, grated lemon-peel and nutmeg; put it into a saucepan, with a little white stock or wa...
-Veal. Part 6
Veal Roll Bone a small breast of veal, and spread over it a rich and highly-seasoned forcemeat. Cut four hard-boiled eggs the long way into four pieces, and lay them in rows, with green pickles betwe...
-Veal Cutlets
Veal Cutlets (1) Let your cutlets be about half an inch thick; trim them, and flatten them with a cleaver; you may fry them in fresh butler, or good drippings; when brown on one side, turn them and d...
-Fricandeau Veal
Fricandeau Veal (1) Cut a piece of veal from the leg, the same in width and depth, and about eight inches in length. Make a hole in the under part, and fill it with forcemeat; sew it up, lard the top...
-Veal Knuckle
Veal Knuckle Ragout Cut a knuckle of veal into slices about half an inch thick; pepper, salt, and flour them; fry them a light brown; put the trimmings into a stewpan, with the bone broke in several ...
-Veal Pie
Veal Pie (1) Cut a neck of veal into neat steaks, season them well with white pepper, salt, mace, and grated nutmeg mixed; pack them closely into a dish, and put in half a pint of white stock; five h...
-Vegetables
There is nothing in which the difference between an elegant and an ordinary table is more seen than in the dressing of vegetables, more especially greens. They may be equally as fine at first, at one ...
-Velocte
Take the cintings and remains of any joints of veal and fowl you may bare in the house, of which take four pounds, and put into a large stewpan, with some carrots, onions, parsley, scallions, three ba...
-Venison
The choice of venison should be regulated by the appearance the tat, which, when the venison is looks thick, clear, and close; as it begins to change first towards the haunches, run a knife into that ...
-Hashed Venison
Hashed Venison (1) If you have enough of its won gravy left, it is preferable to any to warm it up in: if not, take some of the mutton gravy, or the bones and trimmings of the joint (after you have c...
-Venison Pie Or Venison Pasty
Venison Pasty (1) Cut a neck or breast into small steaks, rub them over with a seasoning of sweet herbs, grated nutmeg, pepper, and salt: fry them slightly in butter; line the sides and edges of a di...
-Vermicelli
Vermicelli, Queen's Blanch about a quarter of a pound of vermicelli in boiling water, drain it, and throw it into some rich well-seasoned stock; when tender, take it out of the soup, and put it into ...
-Vermicelli Puddings
Vermicelli Pudding (1) Boil a quarter of a pound of vermicelli with a little cinnamon, in a quart of milk; in the meantime mix a quarter of a pound melt-ed butter with a pint of cream, and the yolks ...
-Vinegar
Vinegar is cooling, opening, excites the appetite, assists digestion, is good for hot stomachs, resists putrefaction, and therefore very good against pestilential diseases. Too much use of it injures ...
-Vinegar. Part 2
Basil Vinegar Sweet basil is in full perfection about the middle of August. Fill a wide-mouthed bottle with the fresh green leaves of basil (these give much finer and more flavor than the dried,) and...
-Vinegar. Part 3
Garlic Vinegar Cut small one ounce and a half of garlic, bruise one nutmeg and three cloves, steep them in a quart of vinegar for a week, shaking it daily; then strain and bottle it. Shallot vinegar ...
-Vol-Au-Vent
(1) Cut some cold turkey or veal into small thin slices, season it with dried lemon-peel grated, pepper, pounded mace, and salt; add one anchovy, some garlic and onion pounded, also a little good grav...
-Voldron
Melt eleven ounces of fresh butter in a brass pan, and when quite hot, add the same quantity of pounded loaf sugar, and eight well-bealen eggs; stir constantly for six or eight minutes, and put it int...
-Wafers
Take a pint of good cream, half a pound of sifted flour, half a pound of powder sugar, and two drachms of orange-flower water. Beat the cream with the flour, a little at a time, until both are mixed p...
-Walnuts
Make a brine of salt and water, in the proportion of a quarter of a pound of salt to a quart of water; put the walnuts into this to soak for a week; or if you wish to soften them so that they may be s...
-Walnut Ketchup
Walnut Ketchup (1) Thoroughly' well bruise one hundred and twenty young walnuts; put to them three quarters of a pound of salt, and a quart of good wine vinegar; stir them every day for a fortnight; ...
-Walnut Pickle
Put any quantity of the outside shells or green rinds of ripe walnuts into a tub in which there is a tap-hole; sprinkle them with water, raise the tub on one side, that it may stand in a sloping direc...
-Water Souchy
Make a stock with three or four flounders, boiled in three quarts of water, two onions, and a bunch of parsley, till they are soft enough to pulp through a sieve with the liquor they were boiled in; t...
-Welsh Rabbit
Pare the crust off a slice of bread, toast it nicely, divide it in two, butter it, and lay upon each half a thin slice of cheese which has been toasted in a Dutch oven; if, when put upon the toast, it...
-Whey
Whey (1) Make a pint of milk boil; put to it a glass or two of white wine; put it on the fire till it just boils again; then set it on one side till the curd has settled; pour off the clear whey, and...
-Whey White Wine
Boil a pint of milk, and when it rises in the pan, pour in one glass of sherry and one of currant wine; let it again boil up, take it off the fire, and, when it has stood a few minutes, remove the cur...
-White Beet Leaves
Pick and wash them clean, put them on in boiling water with a little salt, cover the saucepan, and boil them longer than spinach; drain off' the water, and beat them as spinach, with a bit of butter a...
-Whitings
In choosing whitings, be careful that the skin has a silvery appearance, that the body is firm, and the fins stiff; these are sure proofs of its freshness. Whitings, English Way Put into a saucepan ...
-Fried Whitings
Fried Whitings (1) Take as many whitings as you may require; cleanse, scale, and wipe them dry; then run them through the eyes with a skewer, soak them well in milk; flour, and fry them of a nice col...
-White Fish And Sauce
Make a rich gravy with, a bit of veal, the heads and fins of four or five haddocks, three or four onions, some parsley, a little cayenne, black pepper and salt, the juice of a lemon, half the peel, a ...
-White Pot
Beat up the yorks of eight, and the whites of four eggs, with two quarts of new milk, a little rose water, a nutmeg, grated, and a quarter of a pound of sugar; cut a small roll into very thin slices, ...
-White Roux Or White Thickening For Sauces And Made Dishes
Ielt gradually, over a slow fire, a good piece of butter, and dredge in a sufficiency of flour to make it like a thin paste; keep stirring it for a quarter of an hour, and then put it into a small jar...
-Wild Ducks
For roasting a wild duck, you must have a clear, brisk fire, and a hot spit; it must be browned upon the outside, without being sodden within. To have it well frothed and full of gravy is the nicety. ...
-Wine (Madeira) Sauce
Take a tea-spoon(ul of flour, and a preserved green lemon, cut into dice, mix them with a glass of Madeira wine, and a little consomme, add an ounce of butter, some salt and nutmeg; set these on a ver...
-Winter Hotch-Potch
Take the best end of a neck or loin of mutton; cut it into neat chops; cut four carrots, and as many turnips into slices; put on four quarts of water, with half the carrots and turnips, and a whole on...
-Woodcocks
Woodcocks (1) The greatest possible care should be taken, in picking of these birds, to handle them as little as possible, on account of the skin being so particularly tender, that when broken it spo...
-Yeast
Beer yeast, which is the best for bread, should be strained through a hah sieve, and two or three quarts of cold spring water poured over it; when it has stood for twenty-four hours the water should b...
-Zests
Zest (a term of art, used by confectioners) is the peel of oranges, lemons, or citrons, cut from top to bottom, in smaill slips or zests, as thin as possible. ...
-Almond Dragees
Take of the best and largest almonds what quantity you please, and haying washed them in cold water, let them drain and dry on a sieve for twenty-four hours. The next day weigh them, and for each poun...
-Marbled Biscuits
Make twenty-four eggs, a pound of powder-sugar, and three-quarters of a pound of dried and sifted flour, into a biscuit paste, as directed for Spoon Biscuits; then beat four ounces of dissolved chocol...
-Savoy Biscuits
Take fiftv-six eggs, four pounds of sugar, the zes-tes of four oranges, a pound and three-quarters of potatoe-flour sifted; and make your biscuit as follows: grate the zestes of the oranges on a piece...
-Wines
Balm Wine Boil twenty pounds of lump sugar in four gallons and a half of water gently for an hour, and put it in a tub to cool. Bruise two pounds of the tops of green balm, and put them into a barrel...
-Confectionery
Badhne, Indian Take a pound of starred anise, pound and infuse it in six quarts of good brandy for a week, when add to it a pint and a half of water, and distil it. Dissolve seven pounds and a half o...
-Confectionery. Part 2
Flowers In Sugar Clarify sugar to a caramel height, which may be known by dipping in a fork, and if it throws the sugar as fine as threads, put in the flowers. Have ready some tea-cups, with the insi...
-Confectionery. Part 3
Sirup Of Mulberries Take as many mulberries as will yield three pints of juice, which put into a preserving pan with three pints of water; boil until this quantity is reduced to one pint; then lay th...
-Almond Confectionery
Blown Almonds Scald a few almonds, and pound them to about half as fine as for biscuits, heat them with lemon-juice, whites of eggs and powder-sugar; drop them on paper, about the size of almonds, an...
-Almond Confectionery. Part 2
Almond Candy Blanch a pound of the best almonds, and cut them very thin, lengthways, put them into a pound of clarified sugar to crisp them, stir them over the fire till boiled to souffle; then take ...
-Almond Confectionery. Part 3
Almonds Chocolate Colored Are dyed with chocolate dissolved in water and strained. The almonds may be cut in slips, dice. etc. according to fancy. Observe that the color of your almonds should be li...
-Almond Confectionery. Part 4
Bitter Almond Cheese Peel, wash, and drain, three ounces of sweet, and one ounce of bitter almonds, pound them to a paste, moistening with two spoonfuls of water. Put them into an earthen pan, with t...
-Almond Confectionery. Part 5
Grillage Almond Blanch half a pound of almonds, cut them into four or five slips, lengthways, pralinez them with three-eighths of a pound of sugar, sand them when they begin to crackle; then put them...
-Almond Confectionery. Part 6
Almond Paste Blanch two pounds of sweet almonds, and soak them in cold water for twelve hours, then dry them in a napkin, and pound a quarter of them to a very fine paste with a little water and lemo...
-Almond Confectionery. Part 7
Rock Of Alicante, Spanish Almonds Clarify honey, and stir into it as many blanched almonds as you can entangle. Leave it to cool. This makes a pretty crystaline ornament for the dessert; it is also c...
-Angelica Confectionery
Angelica Cakes Take four ounces of angelica powder, and two pounds of fine sugar. Beat up the white of an egg with a little sifted sugar, until it is of the consistence of cream cheese; dissolve the ...
-Aniseed Confectionery
Oil Of Aniseed Is made like aniseed water, the only difference is, that an additional pound of sugar is necessary to make the sirup. Anise Petit Pains Put two glasses of water and two ounces of fre...
-Apple Confectionery
Apple Fritters Turn twelve small apples, cut them into halves, an 1 boil them in simp, then leave them to cool. When they are cold, make an extremely ihin crust with brioche paste. Make a fritter lor...
-Apricot Confectionery
Apricots Bottled Press the quantity of ripe apricots you may require through a horse-hair sieve; put the pulp into bottles, cork them very close, and tie them over; place these bottles upright in a l...
-Barbadoes Confectionery
Barbadoes Cream Take the zests of three fine cedrats, two drachms of cinnamon, and two of mace, and put them into three quarts of brandy; close the vessel hermetically, and let it infuse for a week, ...
-Barberry Confectionery
Barberry Biscuits Press the juice through a sieve from two pounds of barberries, and mix with it five pounds of sifted sugar; whisk the whites of four eggs and add them to the fruit; prepare some squ...
-Barley Confectionery
Barley Sugar Clarify two pounds of sugar, and boil it to caramel height, in 9. deep copper vessel with a lip; pour it in straight lines about an inch thick, on a marble slab previously rubbed with bu...
-Bergamot Confectionery
Bergamot Drops Mix the juice of four or five lemons, and some sifted sugar, with a wooden spoon; add to this twenty drops of essence of bergamot; mix it well in, and having stirred it over the fire t...
-Bouchees
Bouchees De Dames Mix with six eggs, a quarter of a pound of sugar, three ounces of potato-flour, a little salt, and a pinch of dried orange-flowers: beat them together well, and having buttered a ti...
-Sirup Of Buckthorn
Sirup Of Buckthorn (1) Gather the berries in the heat of the day, and set in an earthen vessel in the oven; squeeze out the juice, and for each peck of berries put two pounds of white sugar, and boil...
-Butter Confectionery
Well made pure butter is lenient and nourishing, eaten cold, in moderation, with bread. But upon hot new bread, or hot toast, or used as sauce to animal food, it is not wholesome. In the two first ins...
-Liquorice Deserts
Liquorice Cakes Take hyssop and red rose water, of each half a pint, half a pound of green liquorice, the outside scraped off, and then beat with a pestle; put to it half a pound of aniseeds, and ste...
-Candies
Candying Fruit intended for candying must be first preserved, and dried in a stove before the fire, that none of the sirup may remain in it. Sugar intended for the use of candying must be thus prepar...
-Canellons
Make a stiff paste, with a little melted butter, a spoonful or two of water, some rasped lemon-peel, an egg, a quarter of a pound of flour, and half that quantity of sugar; roll it very thin; make a l...
-Sirup Of Capillaire
The capillaire of Canada, although that of Mont-pelier is equally good, is a very odoriferous vegetable, light and agreeable, but so extremely volatile, that the greatest part of it is dissipated duri...
-Caramel
Break into a small copper or brass pan one pound of refined sugar; put in a gill of spring-water; set it on a fire; when it boils skim it quite clean, and let it boil quick, till it comes to the degre...
-Caraway Confectionery
Caraway Cake Dry a quarter of a peck of fine flour in an oven; rub a pound and a half of fresh butter in it, till it is crumbled so small that none of it is to be seen; then take six spoonfuls of ros...
-Cassia Confectionery
Cassia Candied Pound a little musk and ambergris with as much of the powder of cassia as will lie on two shillings. Having pounded them well together, take a quarter of a pound of fine sugar, and as ...
-Cedrat Confectionery
Blancmange Of Cedrats Grate the rind of a cedrat upon some sugar in the usual way, until six ounces of sugar have been used; blanch and pound a pound of sweet almonds, moistening them with water; whe...
-Cherry Confectionery
Cherries, Dried Take large cherries, not too ripe; pick off the stalks, and take out the stones with a quill cut nearly as for a pen: to three pounds of which take three pounds or pints of clarified ...
-Chestnuts In Caramel
Chestnuts In Caramel. (1) Roast chestnuts as for the table; take off the skins; dip each in the whites of eggs beaten, and then roll them in powder-sugar; lay them separately on paper to dry, in a mo...
-Chestnut Compote
Chestnut Compote (1) Take the outer skin from about a hundred chestnuts, and then put them into a saucepan with water, a lemon cut in pieces, and three handfuls of bran; put them on the (ire and blan...
-Chestnut Cream
Chestnut Cream (1) Pound twenty-five roasted chestnuts in a mortar, with a little milk: then put the paste so made into a stewpan, with the yolks of two eggs, half a pint of milk, two ounces of butte...
-Chocolate Confectionery
Chocolate Almonds Take a pound of chocolate finely grated, and a pound and a half of the best sugar, finely sifted; soak some guin-dragon in orange-flower water, and work them into what form you plea...
-Chocolate Confectionery. Continued
Chocolate Ice Water Take three ounces of chocolate, warm it, and mix with it half a gill of sirup, and half a pint of water; mix it well, and freeze it thick. Chocolate Macaroons Put a quarter of a...
-Chocolate Ice Cream
Chocolate Ice Cream. (1) Take any quantity of chocolate, melt it over the fire in a small pan; when melted pour it into that in which you are to make your cream; break your yolks of eggs into it, (fo...
-Candied Cinnamon
Candied Cinnamon (1) Soak cinnamon in water for four and twenty hours, and then cut it into pieces about an inch long; prepare some sugar to grand lisse, and give the cinnamon a boil in it; drain and...
-Cinnamon Confectionery
Cinnamon Cakes Whisk up half a dozen eggs with three table-spoonfuls of rose water; add to it a pound of sifted sugar, a dessert-spoonful of powdered cinnamon, and a sufficient quantity of flour to m...
-Citron Confectionery
Citron, Candied Pare the citrons very thin and narrow, and throw them into water; these are called faggots; then cut the citron into slices of any thickness you think proper; take out the inner part ...
-Ratafia
Ratafia Of Four Fruits Take ten pounds of very ripe cherries, two pounds and a half of raspberries, five pounds and a half of red and two pounds of black currants; pick, and mix these fruits together...
-Sirup Of Citron
Sirup Of Citron (1) Put into a china bowl alternate layers of fine powder- sugar, and citron, pared, and cut in very thin slices, and let them stand till the next day; then strain off the sirup, and ...
-Clove Confectionery
Oil Of Cloves This is made in the same manner as cinnamonum; the quantities are, an ounce of cloves to three quarts of brandy, and four pounds of sugar dissolved in four pints of water. Clove Pastil...
-Coffee Confectionery
Coffee Bonbons Take about a pint of coffee made with water; put in it a pound of loaf-sugar; set it on the fire and boil it to a high degree; then add a full pint of double cream, and let it boil aga...
-Sirup Of Coltsfoot
Take of coltsfoot six ounces, maidenhair two ounces, hyssop one ounce, liquorice-root one ounce; boil them in two quarts of spring water till one fourth is consumed; then strain it, and put to the liq...
-Conserves
Conserves, Dried For all sorts of conserves, the sugar should be prepared to the ninth degree, according to the quantity wanted; they are all made much after the same manner, the only difference bein...
-Coriander Confectionery
Coriander Dragees Take any quantity of coriander seeds, put them in the tossing-pan over the fire, and let them warm; when they are warm throw in about half a glass of vinegar, stir them well till th...
-Croquettes
Croquettes Of Destrees Use the best puff paste; roll it pretty thin, and cut it into different shapes, as fancy leads; bake it, and dress each piece upon a dish, in a handsome manner; rub them with a...
-Curacao
This is a species of bitter or wild orange, of which the rind is dried, and may be had at the druggists. To make the liqueur called by this name, wash a pound of curacao several times in warm water; t...
-Currant Confectionery
Currant Cakes Pick and wash the currants, either white or red; to two quarts of currants, put one pint of water; when boiled, run the juice through a jelly bag, do not press the bag; to one quart of ...
-Currant Ices
Currant Ices (1) Boil two pounds of red currants a moment with a quarter of a pound of raspberries; rub them through a sieve, adding a pint of water, and then the sugar, which must be very well disso...
-Dragees
Dragees En Pastillage These dragees are made of the same materials as the superfine dragees; the only difference consists in their forms, which resemble the bonbons: to make them, it is necessary to ...
-Egg Deserts
Eggs Caramel Take the yolks of a dozen hard eggs, bruise them in a saucepan, with some powder-sugar, three almond biscuits, and half a glass of cream; make these into a paste, of which form little eg...
-Filbert Confectionery
Filbert Biscuits Take some Barcelona filbert nuts, and put them in a mor-tar to break their shells; pick all the shells from them clean, pound them in a mortal very fine, and mix whites of eggs with ...
-Gooseberry Confectionery
Gooseberry Cakes Break the gooseberries, press out the juice, and strain it through a muslin; to one pint of juice a pound of sugar; boil up the juice; strew in the sugar;. stir it well; simmer it we...
-Green-Gage Confectionery
Green-Gages To Candy When finished in the sirup, (see green-gages to preserve,) put a layer into a new sieve, and dip it suddenly into hot water, to take off the sirup that hangs about it; then put ...
-Gum Paste
Put a pound of gum-dragon in a basin, with warm water enough to cover one inch above the gum; set this in a warm closet for four and twenty hours; have a new tammy ready laid over a dish; spread it on...
-Juniper Berry Confectionery
Ices Of Juniper Berries Infuse some juniper berries in warm water, or take about a handful of the berries, and boil them a moment with a pint of water, half a pound of sugar, and a bit of cinnamon, a...
-Lemon Confectionery
Lemon Cakes Quarter as many lemons as you think proper, they must have good rinds, and boil them in two or three waters, till they are tender, and have lost their bitterness; then skin them, and put ...
-Lemon Peel Confectionery
Lemon Peel Candied Take some thick-rinded lemons, pare off the yellow peel, and throw it into boiling water till soft, when it must be put into cold water. Clarify some fine sugar, and boil it au pet...
-Macedoine Of Fruit
The macedoine is an ornamental dish, composed of transparent jelly, with various fruits enclosed in it; for this purpose it should be done as follows: Have a dome-shaped mould six inches and a half in...
-Maraschino
Take sixteen pounds of fine sharp cherries, stone and take off the stalks; put them into five quarts of brandy to infuse, covered close for three days, then distil the infusion; distil also a pound of...
-Marchpane
Take four pounds of sweet almonds, throw them into boiling Mater, let them lay till the skin loosens, then put them into cold water, after a few minutes blanch and throw them again into cold water to ...
-Marseilles
Marseilles, Or Ginger Take a pound and a half of double-refined sugar, and boil it to fort souffle, add to it an ounce of ginger in powder, remove the pan from the fire, and with a round stick (like ...
-Meringues
Meringues (1) Whisk the whiles of nine eggs to a solid froth; then add the rind of six lemons, grated extremely fine, and a spoonful of sifted sugar; after which, lay a sheet of wet paper on a tin, a...
-Nuts And Almonds
Most kinds of nuts, and almonds, from their milky or oily nature, contain a good deal of nourishment; but they require to be well chewed, as they are difficult of digestion. Persons with weak stomachs...
-Oils
Oil Of Jupiter Take three quarts of spirits of wine, flavored with essential oil of lemon, the same quantity flavored with spirit of cedrat; make a sirup with seven pounds of sugar, a gallon of water...
-Oranges
Oranges In Brandy Choose the oranges very round and smooth, pare, prick them in the middle, and put them into cold water; then blanch them in boiling water; when they are tender, throw them again int...
-Oranges. Continued
Oranges, Green Scrape out the insides of the oranges quite clean, then let them lie for three days in cold water, chang-inaj the water daily, then boil them very slowly till the water is bitter; then...
-Pastilles
To make these articles, it is necessary to have a small copper stew-pan that will hold about a pint, rather deep than wide, with a pointed lip on the right side, and a tolerably 1ong handle, also two ...
-Pear Confectionery
Pears In Brandy Take some beurre pears, not too ripe, put them into a saucepan with a sufficient quantity of water to cover them, set them on the tire, and let them simmer, but not boil, until the pe...
-Pine Apple Confectionery
Pine Apple Chips Pare and trim a pine-apple, divide, and slice each half into pieces a quarter of an inch thick; lake half the weight of the fruit in powder-sugar: lay the slices in a basin, with sug...
-Plum Confectionery
Plums, In Brandy Take twelve pounds of fine magnum bonum plums, and three pounds of sugar; the fruit should be turned in color, but not ripe; prick, and put them into a saucepan with cold water, set ...
-Pomegranate Confectionery
Pomegranate Clear Cakes Pare some good boiling apples, and put them into a saucepan with as much water as will . cover them, set them on the fire, and when perfectly soft, press the pulp through a si...
-Poupelin
Put into a saucepan four glasses of water, a quarter of a pound of butter, the zeste of a lemon, and a pinch of fine salt; set it on the fire, and as soon as it begins to boil, take it off, and put in...
-Raspberry Confectionery
Raspberry Cakes Gather some raspberries before they are quite ripe, pick, and lay them in a stove to dry; then beat them in a mortar. Take a pound and quarter of fine sugar, clarify and boil it to ca...
-Roses Confectionery
Roses, Can Died Crisp two handfuls of rose-leaves in some clarified sugar, boil them to fort souffle, then take the pan from the fire, pour it on a sieve, let the sirup run from the leaves, rubbing t...
-Sugared Seeds
These are done in the same manner as sugared almonds. The seeds most generally used for this purpose are anise, cummin, and fennel. The best method of proceeding is as follows: place a small preservi...
-Sottfle Francais
Make a croustade eleven inches in diameter, and three and three-quarters in height; put round it three sheets of buttered paper, and bake it. Take twelve glasses of boiling milk, in which infuse what...
-Strawberry Confectionery
Compote Of Strawberry This is made in the same manner as Raspberries, only that the strawberries do not require being mixed with any other fruit. Strawberry Conserve Take some very ripe fresh straw...
-Sugar Confectionery
How To Clarify Sugar Take four pounds of sugar, and break it into pieces; put into a preserving-pan the white of an egg, and a glass of pure spring water; mix them well with a whisk, add another glas...
-Trifles
Trifle (1) Sweeten three pints of cream; add to it half a pint of mountain wine, grate in the rind of a lemon, squeeze in the juice, and grate in half a nutmeg; whisk this up, lay the froth on a larg...
-Vanilla Cream
Take two drachms of vanilla, a quart of milk, the yolks of three eggs, five ounces of sugar, and a pint of cream; beat up the eggs well with the milk, and then add the other ingredients; set the whole...
-Verde
Infuse the rind of three lemons and four oranges in two quarts of rum or brandy, for four-and-twenty hours, closely stopped; then squeeze the juice through a strainer; if the fruit is good, there ...
-Verjuice
Verjuice (1) Verjuice is the young, unripe, and sour grape; it is frequently used in French cookery, but very rarely put into English dishes. Verjuice (2) Take some crab apples when the kernels tur...
-Violets Confectionery
Violets Candied Pick off the green stalks from some double violets; boil some sugar to souffle; put in the violets, and keep them in till the sugar again boils to souffle; then rub the sugar against ...
-Violet Drops
Violet Drops (1) Take a certain quantity of sirup of violets, which mix with an equal portion of water; use this mixture, and make your drops precisely as directed. You may, if you please, perfume it...
-Liqueurs
Angelica Liqueur Wash, scrape, and cut in small pieces, twelve ounces of fresh, or half the quantity of Bohemian angelica roots, and infuse them for a week in six pints of brandy and one of water, wi...
-Explanation Of Some Of The Terms Made Use Of In The Foregoing Pages
Atelets Small silver skewers. Baba A French sweet yeast cake. Bain-Marie See the word in its place. Bouquet A bunch of parsley and scallions tied up to put in soups, etc. Bouquet Garni, Or Ass...
-Seventy-Five Receipts - Pastry, Cakes And Sweetmeats
By Miss Leslie, Of Philadelphia The following Receipts for Pastry, Cakes, and Sweetmeats, are original, and have been used by the author and many of her friends with uniform success. They are drawn u...
-Pastry. Preliminary Remarks
In making pastry or cakes, it is best to begin by weighing out the ingredients, sifting the flour, pounding and sifting the sugar and spice, washing the butter, and preparing the fruit. Sugar can be ...
-Puff Paste
Half a pound and two ounces of sifted flour. Half pound of best fresh butter, washed. A little cold water. This will make puff-paste for two Puddings, or for one soup-plate Pie, or for four small She...
-Common Paste For Pies
A pound and a half of sifted flour. Three quarters of a pound of butter, washed. This will make one large pie or two small ones. Sift the flour into a pan. Cut the butter into two equal parts. Cut ...
-Pies And Tarts. Mince Pies
Two pounds of boiled beef's heart, or fresh tongue, or lean fresh beef - chopped when cold. Two pounds of beef suet, chopped fine. Four pounds of pippin apples, chopped. Two pounds of raisins, ston...
-Oyster Pie
A hundred large fresh oysters, or more if small. The yolks of six eggs boiled hard. A large slice of stale-bread, grated. A tea-spoonful of salt. A table-spoonful of pepper. A table-spoonful of mixed ...
-Fruit Pies
Fruit pies for family use, are generally made with common paste, allowing three quarters of a pound of butter to a pound and a half of flour. Peaches and plums, for pies, should be cut in half, and t...
-Pine-Apple Tart
One large pine-apple, or two small ones. Half a pound of powdered white sugar, Half a pint of cream. Pare your pine-apple, cut it in small pieces, and leave out the core. Mix the pine-apple with the ...
-Peach Tart
Take ripe juicy free-stone peaches, pare them, and cut them into small pieces; of course leave out the stones, half of which must be cracked, and the kernels blanched and mixed with the peaches. Mix i...
-Beef-Steak Pie
Butter a deep dish, and spread a sheet of paste all over the bottom, sides, and edge. Cut away from your beef-steak all the bone, fat, gristle, and skin. Cut the lean in small thin pieces, about as l...
-Puddings. Plum Pudding
One pound of raisins, stoned and cut in half. One pound of currants, picked, washed and dried. One pound of beef suet chopped fine. One pound of grated stale bread, or, half a pound of flour and half ...
-Lemon Pudding
One small lemon, with a smooth thin rind. Three eggs. A quarter pound of powdered white sugar. A quarter pound of fresh butter - washed. A table-spoonful of white wine and brandy, mixed. A tea-spoonf...
-Almond Pudding
Half a pound of sweet almonds, which will be reduced to a quarter of a pound, when shelled and blanched. An ounce of blanched bitter almonds or peach-kernels. The whites only, of six eggs. A quarter o...
-Orange Pudding
One large orange, of a deep color, and smooth thin rind. One lime. A quarter pound of powdered white sugar. A quarter of a pound of fresh butter. Three eggs. A table-spoonful of mixed wine and brand...
-Cocoa-Nut Pudding
A quarter of a pound of cocoa-nut, grated. A quarter pound of powdered white sugar. Three ounces and a half of fresh butter. The whites only of six eggs. A table-spoonful of wine and brandy mixed. Hal...
-Sweet Potato Pudding
A quarter of a pound of boiled sweet potato. Three eggs. A quarter pound of powdered white sugar A quarter of a pound of fresh butter. A glass of mixed wine and brandy. A half-glass of rose-water. A ...
-Pumpkin Pudding
Half a pound of stewed pumpkin. Three eggs. A quarter of a pound of fresh butter, or a pint of cream. A quarter pound of powdered white sugar Half a glass of wine and brandy mixed. Half a glass of r...
-Gooseberry Pudding
A pint of stewed gooseberries, with all their juice. A quarter of a pound of powdered sugar. Two ounces of fresh butter. Two ounces of grated bread. Three eggs. Stew the gooseberries till quite soft....
-Baked Apple Pudding
A pint of stewed apples. Half a pint of cream, or two ounces of butter. A quarter of a pound of powdered sugar. A nutmeg, grated. A table-spoonful of rose-water. A tea-spoonful of grated lemon-pe...
-Batter Pudding
Six eggs One pound of sifted flour. One quart of milk. A salt-spoonful of salt. Stir the flour, gradually, into the milk, carefully dissolving all the lumps. Beat the eggs very light, and add them b...
-Indian Pudding
A pound of beef-suet, chopped very fine. A pint of molasses. A pint of rich milk. Four eggs. A large tea-spoonful of powdered nutmeg and cinnamon. A little grated or chipped lemon-peel. Indian mea...
-Cheese Puddings
Cheese (1) Grate one pound of mild cheese; beat well four eggs, oil one ounce of butter; mix these ingredients together with one gill of cream, and two table-spoonfuls of grated and sifted bread, and...
-Citron Puddings
Citron Pudding (1) Mix together a pint of cream and the yolks of six eggs; add to this four ounces of fine sugar, the same of citron, shred fine, two spoonfuls of flour, and a little nutmeg; place ti...
-Bread Pudding
A quarter pound of grated stale bread. A quart of milk, boiled with two or three sticks of cinnamon, slightly broken Eight eggs. A quarter of a pound of sugar. A little grated lemon-peel. Two ounces ...
-Rice Pudding
A quarter of a pound of rice. A quarter of a pound of butter. A quarter of a pound of sugar. A pint and a half of milk, or cream and milk. Six eggs. A tea-spoonful of mixed spice, mace, nutmeg an...
-Ground Rice Pudding
Take five table-spoonfuls of ground rice and boil it in a quart of new milk, with a grated nutmeg or a tea-spoonful of powdered cinnamon, stirring it all the time. When it has boiled, pour it into a p...
-Chicken Pudding
Cut up a pair of young chickens, and season them with pepper and salt and a little mace and nutmeg. Put them into a pot with two large spoonfuls of butter, and water enough to cover them. Stew them ge...
-Boston Pudding
Make a good common paste with a pound and a half of flour, and three quarters of a pound of butter.* When you roll it out the last time, cut off the edges, till you get the sheet of paste of an even s...
-A Cheese-Cake
Four eggs. Half a pint of milk. A quarter of a pound of butter. A quarter of a pound of powdered sugar. Two ounces of grated bread. A table-spoonful of mixed brandy and wine. A tea-spoonful of r...
-Fine Custards Custards, Curds And Creams
A quart of milk or cream. The yolks only, of sixteen eggs. Six ounces of powdered white sugar. Half an ounce of cinnamon, broken in small pieces. A large handful of peach-leaves, or half an ounce of p...
-Plain Custards
A quart of rich milk. Eight eggs. A quarter of a pound of powdered sugar. A handful of peach-leaves, or half an ounce of peach-kernels, broken in pieces. A nutmeg. Boil the peach-leaves or kernels...
-Cold Custards
A quart of new milk, and a half a pint of cream, mixed. A quarter pound of powdered white sugar. A large glass of white wine, in which an inch of washed rennet has been soaked. A nutmeg. Mix together...
-Almond Custard
One pint of cream. One pint of rich milk. Half a pound of shelled sweet almonds. Two ounces of shelled bitter almonds. Four table-spoonfuls of rose-water. A quarter of a pound of white sugar. The yolk...
-Rice Custards
Half a pound of rice. Half a pound of raisins or currants. Eight yolks of eggs or six whole eggs. Six ounces of powdered sugar. A quart of rich milk. A handful of peach-leaves, or half an ounce o...
-Curds And Whey
Take a small piece of rennet about two inches square. Wash it very clean in cold water, to get all the salt off, and wipe it dry. Put it in a tea-cup, and pour on it just enough of lukewarm water to c...
-A Trifle
A quart of cream. A quarter pound of loaf-sugar, powdered. Half a pint of white wine Half a gill of brandy mixed. Eight maccaroons, or more if you choose. Four small sponge-cakes or Naples biscuit....
-Whipt Cream
A quart of cream. The whites of four eggs. Half a pint of white wine. A quarter pound of powdered loaf-sugar. Ten drops of strong essence of lemon, of two lemons cut in thin slices, or the juice o...
-Ice Cream
A quart of rich cream, boiled and set away till cold. Half a pound of powdered loaf-sugar. The juice of two large lemons, or a pint of strawberries or raspberries; or an ounce of bitter almonds, bla...
-Another Kind Of Ice-Cream
A pint and a half of rich cream. A (mart and a half-pint of morning's milk. One pound of loaf-sugar. Two eggs. One table-spoonful of flour. Two lemons. Or half a Vanilla bean, split into small p...
-Floating Island
Six whites of eggs. Six large table-spoonfuls of jelly. A pint of cream, sweetened with loaf-sugar. Put the jelly and white of egg into a pan, and beat it together with a whisk, till it becomes a s...
-Cakes, Nuts And Gingerbread
In making cakes, it is particularly necessary that the eggs should be well beaten. They are not sufficiently light till the surface looks smooth and level, and till they get so thick as to be of the c...
-Queen Cake
One pound of powdered white sugar. One pound of fresh butter - washed. Fourteen ounces of sifted flour. Ten eggs. One wine-glass of wine and brandy, mixed. Half a glass of rose-water, or twelve d...
-Almond Cake
Two ounces of blanched bitter almonds, pounded very fine. Seven ounces of dour, sifted and dried. Ten eggs. One pound loaf-sugar, powdered and sifted. Two table-spoonfuls of rose-water. Take two oun...
-Pound Cake
One pound of flour, sifted. One pound of white sugar, powdered and sifted. One pound of fresh butter. Ten eggs. Half a glass of wine Half a glass of brandy Half a glass of rose-water nixed. Twelve ...
-Sponge Cake
Twelve eggs. Ten ounces sifted flour, dried near the fire. A pound of loaf sugar, powdered and sifted. Twelve drops of essence of lemon. A grated nutmeg. A tea-spoonful of powdered cinnamon and mace...
-Black Cake Or Plum Cake
One pound of flour sifted. One pound of fresh butter. One pound of powdered white sugar. Twelve eggs. Two pounds of the best raisins. Two pounds of currants. Two table-spoonfuls of mixed spice, ...
-French Almond Cake
Six ounces of shelled sweet almonds. Three ounces of shelled bitter almonds, or peach-kernels. Three ounces sifted flour, dried near the fire. Fourteen eggs. One pound of powdered loaf-sugar. Twelve ...
-Macaroons
Half a pound of shelled sweet almonds. A quarter pound of shelled bitter almonds The whites of three eggs. Twenty-four large tea-spoonfuls of powdered loaf-sugar. A tea-spoonful of rose-water. A ...
-Apees
A pound of flour, sifted. Half a pound of butter. Half a glass of wine, and a table-spoonful of rose-water, mixed. Half a pound of powdered white sugar. A nutmeg, grated. A tea-spoonful of beaten ci...
-Jumbles
Three eggs. Half a pound of flour, sifted. Half a pound of butter. Half a pound of powdered loaf-sugar. A table-spoonful of rose-water. A nutmeg, grated. A tea-spoonful of mixed mace and cinnamo...
-Kisses
One pound of the best loaf-sugar, powdered and sifted. The whites of four eggs. Twelve drops of essence of lemon. A tea-cup of currant jelly. Beat the whites of four eggs till they stand alone. Then ...
-Rusks
A quarter of a pound of powdered sugar. A quarter of a pound of fresh butter. One pound of flour, sifted. One egg. Three wine-glasses of milk. A wine-glass and a half of the best yeast. A. table...
-Spanish Buns
Four eggs. Three quarters of a pound of flour, sifted. Half a pound of powdered white sugar. Two wine-glasses and a half of rich milk. Six ounces of fresh butter. A wine-glass and a half of the best ...
-New-York Cup Cake
Four eggs. Four cups of sifted flour. Three cups of powdered white sugar. One cup of butter. One cup of rich milk. One glass of white wine. A grated nutmeg. A tea-spoonful of cinnamon beaten. ...
-Indian Pound Cake
Eight eggs. One pint of powdered sugar. One pint of Indian meal, silted, and half a pint of wheal flour. Half a pound of batter. One nutmeg, grated, - and a tea-spoonful of cinnamon. Half a glass of...
-Ginger Cup Cake
Five eggs. Two large tea-cups full of molasses. The same of brown sugar rolled fine. The same of fresh butter. One cup of rich milk. Five cups of flour, sifted. Half a cup of powdered allspice and cl...
-Butter Biscuits
Half a pound of butter. Two pounds of flour, sifted. Half a pint of milk, or cold water. A salt-spoonful of salt. Cut up the butter in the flour, and put the salt to it. Wet it to a stiff dough with ...
-Loaf Cake
Two pounds of sifted flour, setting aside half a pound to sprinkle in at the last. One pound of fresh butter. One pound of powdered sugar. Four eggs. One pound raisins, stoned, and cut in half. One ...
-Sugar Biscuits
Three pounds of flour, sifted. One pound of butter. A pound and a half of powdered sugar. Half a pint of milk. Two table-spoonfuls of brandy. A small tea-spoonful of pearl-ash dissolved in water....
-Gingerbread Nuts
Two pounds and a half of flour, sifted. One pound of fresh butter. One quart of sugar-house molasses. Two ounces of ginger, or more, if it is not very strong. Twelve dozen grains of allspice, Six do...
-Milk Biscuits
Two pounds of flour, sifted. Half a pound of butter. Two eggs. Six wine-glasses of milk. Two wine-glasses of the best brewer's yeast, or three of good home-made yeast. Cut the butter into the milk, ...
-Common Gingerbread
A pint of molasses. One pound of fresh butter. Two pounds and a half of flour, sifted. A pint of milk. A small tea-spoonful of pearl-ash, or if it is strong. A tea-cup full of ginger. Cut the but...
-Lafayette Gingerbread
Five eggs Half a pound of brown sugar. Half a pound of fresh butter. A pint of sugar-house molasses. A pound and a half of Hour. Four table-spoonfuls of ginger. Two large sticks of cinnamon, Three d...
-New-Year's Cake
Seven pounds of flour, sifted. Half a pound of butter. Half a pound of lard. Two pounds and a half of white Havanna sugar. Having sifted the flour, spread the sugar on the paste-board, a little at a...
-A Dover Cake
Half a pint of milk. A half tea-spoonful of pearl-ash, dissolved in a little vinegar. One pound of sifted flour. One pound of powdered white sugar. Half a pound of butter. Six eggs. One glass of bra...
-Crullers
Half a pound of butler. Three quarters of a pound of powdered while sugar. Six eggs, or seven if they are small. Two pounds of flour, sifted. A grated nutmeg. A tea-spoonful of powdered cinnamon. A ...
-Waffles
Six eggs. A pint of milk. A quarter of a pound of butter. A quarter pound of powdered white sugar. A pound and a half of flour, sifted. A tea-spoonful of powdered cinnamon. Warm the milk slightl...
-Dough-Nuts
Three pounds of sifted flour. A pound of powdered sugar. Three quarters of a pound of butter. Four eggs. Half a large tea-cup full of best brewer's yeast. A pint and a half of milk. A tea-spoonful...
-Soft Muffins
Five eggs. A quart of milk. Two ounces of butter. A tna-spoonful of salt. Two large table-spoonfuls of brewer's yeast or four of home-made yeast. Enough of sifted flour to make a stiff batter. Wa...
-Indian Batter Cakes
A quart of sifted Indian meal, A handful of wheat flour sifted, Three eggs, well beaten, mixed. 1 wo table-spoonfuls of fresh brewer's yeast, or four of home-made yeast. A tea-spoonful of salt. A qua...
-Cream Cakes
A quart of cream. Four eggs. Sifted flour sufficient for a thick batter. A small tea-spoonful of pearl-ash, or a larger one of sal-aeratus. A small tea-spoonful of salt. Beat four eggs till very l...
-Flannel Cakes Or Crumpets
Two pounds of flour, sifted. Four eggs. Three table-spoonfuls of the best brewer's yeast, or four and a half of home-made yeast. A pint of milk. Mix a tea-spoonful of salt with the flour, and set t...
-Jelly Cake
Stir together till very light, half a pound of fresh butter and half a pound of powdered white sugar. Beat twelve eggs very light, and stir them into the butter and sugar, alternately with a pound of ...
-Sweetmeats And Jellies. General Directions
In preparing sugar for sweetmeats, let it be entirely dissolved, before you put it on the fire. If you dissolve it in water, allow about half a pint of water to a pound of sugar. If you boil the suga...
-Blancmange
Four calf's feet. A pint and a half of thick cream.* Half a pound of loaf-sugar, broken up. A glass of wine. Half a glass of rose-water. A tea-spoonful of mace, beaten and sifted. Get four calf'...
-Blancmange. Part 2
Blancmange (2) Boil for a few minutes a pint and a half of new milk, with an ounce of picked isinglass (if in summer, one ounce and a quarter), the rind of half a lemon peeled very thin, a little cin...
-Blancmange. Part 3
Dutch Blancmange Wash one ounce and a half of isinglass, pour a pint and a half of boiling water over it, let it stand for an hour, and then boil it for twenty minutes; strain, and when it is nearly ...
-Calf's-Feet Jelly
Eight calf's feet. Three quarts of water. A pint of white wine. Three lemons. The whites of six egg. Half an ounce of cinnamon. Half pound loaf-sugar, broken into lumps. Endeavor to procure calf's-...
-Apple Jelly
Take the best pippin, or bell-flower apples. No others will make good jelly. Pare, core, and quarter them. Lay them in a preserving kettle, and put to them as much water only, as will cover them, and ...
-Red Currant Jelly
Wash your currants, drain them, and pick them from the stalks. Mash them with the back of a spoon. Put them in a jelly-bag, and squeeze it till all the juice is pressed out. To every pint of juice, a...
-Gooseberry Jelly
Cut the gooseberries in half, (they must be green) and put them in a jar closely covered. Set the jar in an oven, or pot filled with bailing water. Keep the water boiling round the jar till the gooseb...
-Grape Jelly
Pick the grapes from the stems, wash and drain them. Mash them with a spoon. Put them in the preserving kettle, and cover them closely with a large plate. Boil them ten minutes. Then pour them into yo...
-Peach Jelly
Wipe the wool off your peaches, (which should be free-stones and not too ripe) and cut them in quarters. Crack the stones, and break the kernels small. Put the peaches and the kernels into a covered ...
-Preserved Quinces
Pare and core your quinces, carefully taking out the parts that are knotty and defective. Cut them into quarters, or into round slices. Put them into a preserving kettle, and cover them with the parin...
-Preserved Pippins
Pare and core some of the largest and finest pippins. Put them in your preserving kettle,* with some lemon-peel, and all the apple-parings. Add a very little water, and cover them closely. Boil them t...
-Preserved Peaches
Take the largest and finest free-stone peaches, before they are too ripe. Pare them, and cut them in halves or in quarters. Crack the stones, and take out the kernels, and break them in pieces. Put th...
-Preserved Crab Apples
Wash your fruit. Cover the bottom of your preserving kettle with grape leaves. Put in the apples. Hang them over the fire, with a very little water, and cover them closely. Do not allow them to boil, ...
-Preserved Plums
Cut your plums in half, (they must not be quite ripe,) and take out the stones. Weigh the plums, and allow a pound of loaf-sugar to a pound of fruit. Crack the stones, take out the kernels and break t...
-Preserved Strawberries
Weigh the strawberries after you have picked off the sterns. To each pound of fruit allow a pound of loaf-sugar, which must be powdered. Strew half of the sugar over the strawberries, and let them sta...
-Preserved Cranberries
Wash your cranberries, weigh them, and to each pound allow a pound of loaf-sag Dissolve the sugar in a very little water, (about a gill of water to a pound of sugar) and set it on the tire in a preser...
-Preserved Pumpkin
Cut slices from a fine high-colored pumpkin, and cut the slices into chips about the thickness of a dollar. The chips should be of an equal size, six inches in length, and an inch broad. Weigh them, a...
-Raspberry Jam
Allow a pound of sugar to a pound of fruit. Mash the raspbeiries and put them with the sugar into your preserving-kettle. Boil it slowly for an hour, skimming it well. Tie it up with brandy paper. A...
-Preserved Pine-Apple
Pare your pine-apples, and cut them in thick slices taking out the core. Weigh the slices and to each pound allow a pound of 1oaf-sugar. Dissolve the sugar in a very small quantity of water, stir it, ...
-Molasses Candy
Two quarts of West India Molasses. One pound of brown sugar. The juice of two large lemons, or a tea-spoonful of strong essence of lemon. Mix together the molasses and sugar - taking care to use West...
-Spiced Oysters
Two hundred large fresh oysters. Four table-spoonfuls of strong vinegar. A nutmeg, grated. Three dozen of cloves, whole. Eight blades of mace, whole. Two tea-spoonfuls of salt if the oysters are ...
-Oyster Soup
Three pints of large fresh oysters. Two table-spoonfuls of butter, rolled in flour. A bunch of sweet herbs. A saucer full of chopped celery. A quart of rich milk. Pepper to your taste. Take the liqu...
-Stewed Oysters
Open the oysters and strain the liquor. Put to the liquor some grated stale bread, and a little pepper and nutmeg, adding a glass of white wine. Boil the liquor with these ingredients, and then pour i...
-Terrapins
Having boiled your terrapins for ten minutes, take them out of the water and pull off the outer shell. Then boil them again, till the claws become tender. Afterwards take them out of the inner shell,...
-A-La-Mode Beef
A round of fresh beef weighing from eighteen to twenty pounds. A pound of the fat of bacon or corned pork. The marrow from the bone of the beef, A quarter of a pound of beef-suet, chopped together, ...
-A Boned Turkey
A large turkey. Three sixpenny loaves of stale bread. One pound of fresh butter. Four eggs. One bunch of pot-herbs, parsley, thyme, and little onions. Two bunches of sweet marjoram. Two bunches of...
-Collared Pork
A leg of fresh pork, not large. Two table-spoonfuls of powdered sage. Two table-spoonfuls of sweet marjoram, One table-spoonful of sweet basil, powdered. A quarter of an ounce of mace, Half an oun...
-Chicken Salad
Two large cold fouls, either boiled or roasted. The yolks of nine hard-boiled eggs. Half a pint of sweet oil. Half a pint of vinegar. A gill of mixed mustard. A small tea-spoonful of cayenne pepper. ...
-Lobster Salad
Take two large boiled lobsters. Extract all the meat from the shell, and cut it up into very small pieces. For lobster salad, you must have lettuce instead of celery. Cut up the lettuce as small as p...
-Stewed Mushrooms
Take a quart of fresh mushrooms. Peel them and cut off the stems. Season them with pepper and salt. Put them in a sauce-pan or skillet, with a lump of fresh butter the size of an egg, and sufficient c...
-Tomato Ketchup
Slice the tomatoes. Put them in layers into a deep earthen pan, and sprinkle every layer with salt. Let them stand in this state for twelve hours. Then put them over the fire in a preserving-kettle, a...
-Ketchup
Fish Ketchup Take rather more than a pint of vinegar, three pints of red Port, two table-spoonfuls of pepper, pound-d very fine, plenty of shallots and horseradish, the pee! of half a lemon, and two ...
-Cordials
Peach Cordial Take a peck of cling-stone peaches; such as come late in the season, and are very juicy. Pare them, and cut them from the stones. Crack about half the stones and save the kernels. Leave...
-Cherry Bounce
Take a peck of morella cherries, and a peck of black hearts. Stone the morellas and crack the stones. Put all the cherries and the cracked stones into a demi-john, with three pounds of loaf-sugar slig...
-Colouring For Icing
To make a red coloring for icing. Take twenty grains of cochineal powder, twenty grains of cream of tartar, and twenty grains of powdered alum. Put them into a gill of cold soft water and boil it, ver...







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