BY HENRY WILLIAM HERBERT, AUTHOR OF "CROMWELL," "THE BROTHERS," ETC.

READ THE FOLLOWING OPINIONS OF THE PRESS ABOUT IT.

From the Philadelphia Saturday Courier, of Sept. 10th, 1853.

"This historical romance is the most powerfully wrought work which the indomitable genius of the author has ever produced; and is amply sufficient of itself to stamp the writer as a powerful man. The startling schemes and plots which preceded the overthrow of the great Roman Republic, afford ample scope for his well-practised pen, and we may add he has not only been fortunate in producing a work of such masterly pre-tension's, but Mr. Herbert is equally so in the good taste, energy, and tact of his enter-prising publisher. The book is admirably brought out, and altogether may be set down as one of Peterson's ' great hits' in literature."

From the Philadelphia Daily Pennsylvanian, of Sept. 8th, 1853.

"The author has made one of his happiest efforts, and given in this volume a tale which will stand the test of the most rigid criticism, and be read by all lovers of literature that embodies the true, the thrilling, the powerful, and the sublime. In fact, we would have thought it impossible to produce such a tale of the Republic in these latter days; but here we have it - Sergius Cataline, Cethegus, Cassius, and the rest of that dark band of conspirators, are here displayed in their true portraits. Those who have read 'Sallust' with care, will recognize the truthful portraiture at a glance, and see the heroes of deep and treacherous villainy dressed out in their proper devil-doing character. On the other hand, we have Cicero, the orator and true friend of the Commonwealth of Rome. We have also his noble cotemporaries and coadjutors, all in this volume. Would that space permitted for a more extended notice, but we are compelled to forbear. One thing is certain - if this book contained nothing more than the story of Paullus Arvina, it would be a tale of thrilling interest."

From the Cleveland, Ohio, True Democrat, of Sept. 8th, 1S53.

"Those who have perused the former works of this distinguished author, will not fail to procure this book - It is a thrilling romance, and the characters brought forward, and the interest with which they are constantly invested, will insure for it a reat run."

From the Philadelphia City Item, of Sept. 10th, 1853.

"The Roman Traitor demands earnest commendation. It is a powerful production - perhaps the highest effort of the brilliant and successful author. A thorough historian and a careful thinker, he is well qualified to write learnedly of any period of the world's history. The book is published in tasteful style, and will adorn the centre-table."

From the Boston Evening Transcript, of Sept. 6th, 1853.

"This is a powerfully written tale, filled with the thrilling incidents which have made . the period of which it speaks one of the darkest in the history of the Roman Republic. The lovers of excitement will find in its pages ample food to gratify a taste for the dark»r phases of life's drama."

From the Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch, of Sept. 4th, 1853.

"Cataline's conspiracy has been selected by Mr. Herbert as the subject of this story. Taking the historical incidents as recorded by the most authentic authors, he has woven around them a net-work of incident, love and romance, which is stirring and exciting. The faithful manner in which the author has adhered to history, and the graphic style in which his descriptions abound, stamp this as one of the most excellent of his many successful novels."

Trice for the complete work, in two volumes, in paper cover, One Dollar only; or a finer edition, printed on thicker and better paper, and handsomely bound in one volume, muslin, gilt, is published for One Dollar and Twenty-five Cents.

Copies of either edition of the work will be sent to any person at all, to any part of the United States, free of postage, on their remitting the price of the edition they wish, to the publisher, in a letter, post-paid. Published and for sale by T. B. PETERSON, No. 103 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia.

Read the Notices of the Press below.

By Henry William Herbert, Author Of "Cromwell," "The Brothers," Etc.

THIS SPLENDID WORK is published complete in two large volumes, of over 250 pages each, paper cover, price FIFTY CENTS a volume, or the whole work is handsomely bound in one volume, cloth, price ONE DOLLAR AND TWENTY-FIVE CENTS.

This is one of the most powerful Roman stories in the English language, and is of itself sufficient to stamp the writer as a powerful man. The dark intrigues of the days which Csesar, Sallust, and Cicero made illustrious; when Catalinedefied and almost defeated the Senate; when the plots which ultimately overthrew the Roman Republic were being formed, are described in a masterly manner. The book deserves a prominent position by the side of the great Bellum Catalinarium of Sallust, and, if we mistake not, will not fail to occupy a prominent place among those produced in America.

READ THE FOLLOWING OPINIONS OF THE PRESS ABOUT IT. From the Philadelphia Evening Bulletin, of September 3rd 1853

" Since the publication of 'The Last Days of Pompeii,' no fiction of classic times has appeared at all equal to this. The period chosen by Mr. Herbert is even better suited than that selected by Bulwer, both to delineate the manners of ancient Rome; and to enchain the attention of the reader. Thoroughly conversant with the age of which he writes, practised as a moralist, and enthusiastic in his subject, our author has, in this work, executed his master-piece, and may well challenge for it intelligent criticism, as well as popular applause. The character of Cataline, the hero of the volume, in the sense at least in which ' Balfour of Burley' is the hero of; Old Mortality,' is boldly and artistically drawn, not indeed in the dark colors of Sallust, but in the milder tints which more Catholic historians have used. There are so few books in the language which the scholar and ordinary reader can alike peruse with pleasure, that Mr. Herbert may fairly consider himself entitled to the very highest praise for his successful production, in 'The Roman Traitor,' of such a work. The publisher has issued the novel in a handsome style, bound in embossed cloth, so pleasant to all who love pleasant books."

From the Baltimore Republican and Argus, of Sept. 2d, 1853.

"This is the title of a new and powerfully written story from the pen of II. W. Herbert, which of itself would place the anthor among the first writers of the day. Mr. Herbert is already well known as an author of no common merit, and this work must give him a permanent place in the front rank of the literary men of the age. It is a book which may be placed in the library of every man, and will be often referred to with pleasure. The book has been published by T. B. Peterson, and is put up in a style suited to the character of the work, and is altogether an interesting and handsome volume."

From the Philadelphia Dollar Newspaper, of Sept. 7th, 1853

"This is a work calculated to excite a lively interest in literary circles. Roman history ever has a charm for the youthful inquirer after knowledge, and by keeping historical facts steadily in view, the garb of fiction, without material detriment, will greatly add to the number of readers. In the story which the author has woven round the principal incidents in the life and history of Cataline. he claims to have adhered scrupulously to dates, facts, and the historical characters of the individuals introduced. The great aim of the author is to popularize the incidents of Roman history, and by avoiding the cammou errors of writers in the same field, who have preceded of appearing learned, to bring his matter down to the comprehension of the mass of the reading public. He has aimed less at portraying Greeks and Romans, than at depicting men - assuming that in all aires • the human heart is still the human heart, convulsed by the same passions, chilled by the same griefs, burning with the same joys, and, in the main, actuated by the same hopes and fears.'"

Price for the complete work, in two volumes, in paper cover, One Dollar only; or a finer edition, printed on thicker and better paper, and handsomely bound in one volume, muslin, gilt, is published for One Dollar and Twenty-five Cents.

Copies of either edition of the work will be sent to any person at all, to any part of the United States, free of postage, on their remitting the price of the edition they wish, to the publisher, iu a letter, post-paid. Published and for sale by T. B. PETERSON No. 102 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia.