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The Edible Mollusca Of Great Britain And Ireland | by M. S. Lovell



We understand the good qualities of oysters, cockles, and a few other kinds; but some equally nutritious (which are universally eaten on the Continent) are seldom, if ever, seen in our markets, or are only used locally as food, and the proper modes of cooking them are scarcely known. I have therefore endeavoured to call attention to all the eatable species common on our coasts, and also to those which, though not found here in abundance, might be cultivated as easily as oysters, and form valuable articles of food.

TitleThe Edible Mollusca Of Great Britain And Ireland
AuthorM. S. Lovell
PublisherL. Reeve And Co.
Year1884
Copyright1884, L. Reeve & co
AmazonThe Best-Ever Fish & Shellfish Cookbook
Edible Mollusca

WITH Recipes for Cooking them.

M. S. Lovell

M. S. Lovell.

L. Reeve And Co.

"And the recipes and different modes of dressing I am prepared to teach the world for nothing, If men are only wise enough to learn".

-Preface
In these days, when attention has been so much directed towards the cultivation of the common kinds of eatable shell-fish, it is surprising that the importance of certain others for food has been hith...
-Illustrations
Plate I. (Frontispiece). 1. & 2. Helix pomatia. Vine Snail. 3. & 4. Helix nemoralis. Wood Snail. 5. Helix aspersa. Common Garden Snail. 6. Helix Pisana. Banded Snail. Plate II. Pholas dact...
-Edible British Mollusca. Piddocks, Gapers, Razor-Fishes, Etc,. Fam. Pholadidae. Pholas, - Piddock. Pholas Dactylus, Linnaeus Piddock Or Clam
Shell equivalve, oblong-ovate, gaping chiefly anteriorly, inequilateral, thick, white exteriorly and inside polished; exterior covered with longitudinal furrows and concentric striae, with sharp radia...
-Fam. Myadae. Mya. - Gaper.Mya Truncata, Linnaeus. Gaper or Truncated Mya
Shell equal-valved, suboval, gaping much at the small end, truncated and swollen at the other, covered with a pale greenish epidermis, which also continues over its long broad tube and mantles; valves...
-How To Cook Soft Clams
Youghal Way Of Cooking Sugar-Loons Boil them; take them out of the shell, and eat them with a little butter, taking care to cut off the outside skin.* Hampshire Method Of Cooking Myadce Wash ...
-How To Boil Soft Clams
Wash the shells clean, and put the clams, the edges downwards, in a kettle; then pour about a quart of boiling water over them; cover the pot and set it over a brisk fire for three quarters of an hour...
-Fam, Solenidae. Solen. - Razor-Shell.Solen Siliqua, Linnaeus. Razor Shell
Shell straight, open at both extremities. Two teeth in left valve, and one in the other; exterior covered with an olivaceous epidermis, concentrically striated. Breadth 1 inch, length from 7 to 8 inch...
-How To Cook Razor-Fish
Boil them for ten minutes or so, then take them out of their shells, and fry them with butter or lard. Add a little salt and pepper. * ' Notice sur la Malacologie du Littoral de I'Empire Chinois,' ...
-Fam. Tellindae. Psammobia. Psammobia Vespertina, Chemnitz. The Setting Sun
Shell of an oblong oval shape, equivalve, rather flattened, opaque, colour whitish, shading to a reddish yellow at the beaks, with radiating rays of carmine and purplish pink; epidermis of an olivaceo...
-Potage Aux Chobettes (Name Given To Donax Denti-Culata), Martinique Recipe
Wash the shells in several waters to completely free them from the sand. Boil them ten to twelve minutes in the quantity of water required for the soup. Pass the liquid through a fine sieve, and then ...
-Spanish Method Of Making Fish Sauce
Scald the fish in boiling water, sufficiently to make the shells open; but do not let them be heated more than necessary. Clean them nicely, and then mix them with a white sauce. To give a pleasant fl...
-Fam. Mactruae. Mactra. - Trough-Shell.Mactra Solida, Linnaeus. Trough-shell
Shell thick, opaque, of a yellowish-white colour, nearly equal-valved, covered at the sides with a brownish or drab-coloured epidermis; nearly triangular in form, ligament short and internal; beaks sm...
-Fam. Veneridae. Tapes. - Pullet.Tapes Pullastra, Linnaeus. Pullet or Cullyoch
Shell oblong, opaque; valves inequilateral, covered with concentric striae, which become coarser and more wavy towards the extremities, and are crossed by longitudinal striae; ligament external, long,...
-How To Cook Tapes
Tapes Soup - Sopa De Almejas Wash the shells and put them into a saucepan with a little water, then put them on the fire for a few minutes to open them. Pick the fish out and put them into a clean ...
-Potage Of Oysters And Tapes, - Menestra De Ostras Y Almejas
Wash the shells and put them in hot water to open them. Take out the fish, and put them in a saucepan on the fire with a little water; chop two onions small and fry them in butter; while stirring them...
-Venus Verrucosa Linnaeus. Warty Venus
Shell opaque, very solid, inequilateral, covered with concentric ridges which bend backwards, and towards the sides or ends become coarser, forming knots or tubercles. These ridges are divided by fine...
-How To Cook Venus Verrucosa
Boil them, after first washing the shells well to free them from sand and mud, then fry them for a few minutes in a frying-pan, with a little butter or lard, adding pepper and salt according to taste....
-How To Make Clam Soup
Take 50 clams, 1 quart of milk, 1 pint of water, 2 tablespoonfuls of butter. Drain off the liquor from the clams, and put it over the fire with a dozen whole peppers, a few bits of cayenne pods, half ...
-How To Boil Hard Clams
Wash the shells until they are perfectly clean, then put them into a kettle, with the edges downwards; add a pint of water, cover the pot and set it over a brisk fire; when the shells open wide they a...
-Omlet Of Hard-Shell Clams
Make a batter of two well-beaten eggs, to a pint of milk and a gill of the liquor from the clams, with a pint bowl of wheat flour; beat it until it is smooth and perfectly free from lumps; then stir i...
-How To Make Pickled Clams
Boil them from the shells, and take them out with a skimmer and put them into a basin; take of their own liquor half enough to cover over them, and the same quantity of strong vinegar. Whole pepper, a...
-How To Make Clam Chowder
Fry five or six slices of fat pork crisp, and chop to pieces. Sprinkle some of these in the bottom of a pot; lay upon them a stratum of clams; sprinkle with cayenne or black pepper and salt, and scatt...
-Fam. Cyprinidae. Isocardia. - Oxhorn-Cockle.Isocardia Cor, Linnaeus. Heart-Shell or Oxhorn-Cockle
Shell very strong, nearly spherical, heart-shaped, concentrically striated, equivalve, smooth, with a dark reddish-brown epidermis; beaks very prominent and curled; two primary teeth in the right valv...
-Fam. Cardiadae. Cardium. - Cockle.Cardium Edule, Linnaeus. Common Cockle
Shell equivalve, subcordate, with twenty-four or more ribs radiating from the beaks, which are bent inwards; umbones prominent; the internal margins of the valves fluted or indented. Ligament external...
-Fam. Cardiadae. Cardium. Continued
Ossian, in his poem the 'War of Inis-thona,' tells us that the king of that island gave a feast to Oscar, which lasted three days, and that they rejoiced in the shell, - meaning that they feasted su...
-How To Cook Cockles
How To Make Cockle Soup Boil your cockles, pick them out of the shells, then wash them and put them into a saucepan; take two or three pounds of fresh fish, and a cullis, as for crayfish soup, and ...
-How To Stew Cockles
Clean them and wash them from the sand in three or four waters; boil them and pick them out of the shells. To a pint of the fish put half-a-pint of fish stock, two ounces of butter, and some pepper an...
-Cardium Rusticum, Or Tuberculatum, Linnaeus. Red-Nosed Cockle
Shell nearly three inches in length, and two in breadth; very solid, subrotund, opaque, with twenty-one or more broad ribs which radiate from the beaks, with knots or tubercles on them, which on the a...
-How To Cook Red-Nosed Cockle
Paignton Method Of Cooking The Red-Nosed Coclcle Cleanse them for a few hours in cold spring water, and then fry them in a batter made of bread-crumbs.* Cockle Soup After the cockles have bee...
-Fam. Mytilidae. Mytilus. - Mussel.Mytilus Edulis, Linnaeus. Common Mussel
Shell equivalved, wedge-shaped, rather pointed at the beaks. In the hinge are three or four tooth-like crenulations. Ligament internal, or nearly so, and very strong. Colour of the shell a greyish-blu...
-Fam. Mytilidae. Mytilus. Part 2
The Billingsgate market is chiefly supplied with mussels from Holland, the east coast of England, Cornwall, and Devonshire, in August and September; though smaller quantities are received from other p...
-Fam. Mytilidae. Mytilus. Part 3
There is another purpose for which these shells are used, which would astonish the Truefitts, of the present day; for Grey, in his 'Australia,' mentions that amongst the contents of a native woman'...
-Fam. Mytilidae. Mytilus. Part 4
At Tenby, they call Mytilus modiolus the poisonous mussel, and affirm that no one ever ventures to eat it. Pearls are occasionally found in the common mussel, and also in the oyster, scallop, cockl...
-Fam. Mytilidae. Mytilus. Part 5
Oriental pearls are found in the Meleagrina margari-tifera, or pearl-oyster, which belongs to the family Aviculidae. The common freshwater Unio (Unio tumidus), and also Unio pictorum, both produce ...
-How To Cook Mussels
Muskets In Brewet (Broth), 122 Take muskels (mussels), pyke them, seeth hem with the own broth (in their own liquor). Make a lyor (mixture) of crustes (i.e. of brede) and vinegar; do in onyons mync...
-Mussel Soup With Crawfish
Take a hundred mussels, wash them very clean, put them into a stew-pan, cover them close. Let them stew till open, then take them out of their shells, strain the liquor through a fine sieve over the m...
-Mussels A La Poulette
Take two quarts of mussels - the smallest are the most delicate; scrape the shells carefully, with a knife, and wash in water, changed several times, till perfectly free from grit. Put one quart of th...
-How To Dress Mussels
After having well washed and scraped their shells, drain them, and put them to dry in a stew-pan over a good fire, letting them remain till the heat opens them. Then take them out of the shells one by...
-How To Stew Mussels
Clean them and wash them from the sand, in two or three waters; put them into a stew-pan, cover them close, and let them stew till all the shells are opened; then take them out one by one, and to a qu...
-How To Pickle Mussels
Take fresh mussels, wash them very clean, and put them in a pot over the fire till they open. Then take them out of their shells, pick them clean, and lay them to cool. Then put their liquer to some v...
-A Ragout Of Mussels
When the mussels are well cleaned, stew them without water till they open, take them from the shells, save the liquor; put into a stew-pan a piece of butter, with a few chopped mushrooms, a little par...
-How To Boil Mussels (Truro Recipe)
Place them in a saucepan with very little water, as their own liquor helps to boil them. As soon as the shells open take out the fish, and wash them in a small quantity of cold water (about a pint), w...
-Fam. Aviculidae. Pinna. - Sea-Wing.Pinna Pectinata Linnaeus. Sea-wing
Shell wedge-shaped, gaping at one end, and tapering to a point at the other, equivalve, horn-colour; hinge, toothless, straight, and long; ligament, linear, strong and elastic and internal, sometimes ...
-Fam. Aviculidae. Pinna. Part 2
Poli remarks that it rarely appears in the Neapolitan markets. He says that it is cooked at Naples with pepper, oil, and lemou-juice, and served with baked prunes. The large triangular-shaped Pinna...
-Fam. Aviculidae. Pinna. Part 3
From the twelfth to the sixteenth centuries, ex-travagance in jewellery was carried to an unlimited extent at the courts in Europe; and from the reign of Francis I. to that of Louis XIII., the greater...
-Fam. Aviculidae. Pinna. Part 4
The largest pearl known, I believe, is in the possession of Mr. Beresford Hope; it weighs three ounces, and is two inches long, and two and a half inches in circumference, and is set as a pendant: and...
-Fam. Aviculidae. Pinna. Part 5
At the Bahrein fisheries the trade is in the hands of the merchants, who bear hard on the divers, and even those who make the greatest exertions in diving can scarcely obtain a sufficiency of food.* T...
-Fam. Pectinidae. Pegten. - Scallop.Pecten Maximus, Linnaeus. Great Scallop
Shell suborbicular; valves very dissimilar, the upper one concave at the umbones; the under valve very convex; strong ribs, fifteen or sixteen in number; rather broad, and distinctly striated; auricle...
-Fam. Pectinidae. Pegten. Part 2
Again, in Marmion, we read: - The summoned Palmer came in place, His sable cowl o'erhuug his face; In his black mantle was he clad, With Peter's keys in cloth of red On his broad shoulders wrou...
-Fam. Pectinidae. Pegten. Part 3
The port where the body of St. James was landed was called Tria Flavia, now Padron. In those days there reigned over the country a certain queen named Lupa, and she and her people were plunge...
-Fam. Pectinidae. Pegten. Part 4
Other orders of knighthood used the scallop shell as an ornament, viz., that of St. James of Holland, the badge and collar being formed of escallops. It was instituted in 1290 by Florian II., Comte de...
-Pecten Opercularis, Linnaeus. Lid Scallop
Shell spherical; valves convex, of nearly equal dimensions, rather strong; ribs, eighteen or twenty in number, finely striated, both longitudinally and transversely; auricles nearly the same size; lig...
-Fam. Ostreadae. Ostrea. - Oyster.Ostrea Edulis, Linnaeus. Edible Oyster
Shell nearly round, though variously shaped, inequivalve; the upper valve flat, or nearly so, with scales or laminae of a yellowish-brown; the lower valve convex, and foliaceous, of a pale pinkish-whi...
-Fam. Ostreadae. Ostrea. Part 2
Whitstable was a fishing-town of note in the reign of Henry VIII., and was called in ancient records Northwood. Leland, in his 'Itinerary,' thus describes it: - Whitstable is upward junto Kent, a i...
-Fam. Ostreadae. Ostrea. Part 3
The late Duke of Northumberland introduced oyster cultivation on the Northumbrian coast. They were imported and established there, and in the year 1865 the fisheries were allowed to commence, when the...
-Fam. Ostreadae. Ostrea. Part 4
Among the 'Antient Cryes of London' we find the following : - We daily cryes about the streets may hear, According to the season of the year; Some Wellfleet oysters call, others do cry Fine Shelse...
-Fam. Ostreadae. Ostrea. Part 5
The amount of shell-fish consumed in Paris annually, including lobsters, crayfish, oysters, etc, is immense, In 1867, the consumption of oysters in Paris was 26,750,775, of which the greater portion c...
-Fam. Ostreadae. Ostrea. Part 6
It is not only in seaport towns in America that oysters are eaten in enormous quantities, but towns a thousand miles inland are well supplied, and oyster suppers are as common in Cincinnati or St. Lou...
-Fam. Ostreadae. Ostrea. Part 7
The best oysters are those collected in January, February, and March. There are several species of oysters in China. The Bamboo Oysters are grown in the following manner. Old oyster-shells of two kind...
-How To Cook Oysters
Oyster Soup Take fifty oysters; blanch them, but do not let them boil; strain through a sieve, and save the liquor. Put a quarter of a pound of butter into a stew-pan; when it is melted, add six ou...
-How To Make Oyster Sauce
Set a pint of cream upon the hob, beside a fire of clear glowing ashes, in an earthenware pipkin, glazed inside. Take two ounces of butter, and intimately mix with part of it a teaspoonful of best ar...
-How To Cook Oyster Atlets
Blanch throat-sweetbreads, and cut them into slices; then take rashers of bacon the size of the slices of sweetbreads, and as many large oysters blanched as there are pieces of sweetbread and bacon. ...
-How To Stew Oysters
Take the oysters clean from their liquor. Let the liquor stand till it is clear; then put a little of it to the oysters, and stew them; then put to them a little white wine, a little cream, a little ...
-How To Fry Oysters
Take the largest oysters, open them, but do not mangle them, wash them in their own liquor, and take away all bits of shells; strew a little flour over them. Dip them in the yolk of an egg, and fry th...
-A Ragout Of Oysters
Melt some butter, put in a little flour; keep it stirring till brown; wet it with gravy; put in a crust with the oysters and liquor; toss it; season, with pepper, parsley, and fish broth. A Ragou...
-How To Roast Oysters (206)
Place the oysters unopened between the bars of a fire, or in a charcoal stove. They require about six or eight minutes time. Oysters Roasted Take large oysters and spit them upon littl...
-Oysters - Ostras A La Pollada, Spanish, Recipe
Take oysters out of their shells, and blanch them in boiling water; then throw them into cold water, and take them out and let them drain. Put into a saucepan a piece of butter mixed with flour, pars...
-How To Make Oyster Sausages
Take the flesh of the inside of a loin of mutton, and chop it as for force-meat, and season it with spice; then put to it fifty oysters, chopped very small, with a little French bread grated, and the...
-How To Mince Oysters
Take half a hundred oysters, and put them into warm water; when they are ready to boil, shift them into cold water; then drain them, and take that part only which is tender. If you mix the flesh of c...
-How To Make Scalloped Oysters
Scald and beard some dozens of oysters; strain the liquor into a stew-pan, and add thereto two ounces of butter, mixed or kneaded with two ounces of flour, a little cream, anchovy, nutmeg, and cayenn...
-Oyster Loaves
Open the oysters, and save the liquor; wash them in it; then strain it through a sieve, and put a little of it into a tosser, with a bit of butter and flour, white pepper, a scrape of nutmeg, and a l...
-How To Make Oyster Pie
As you open the oysters separate them from the liquor, which strain; parboil them, after taking off the beards; parboil sweetbreads, and cutting them in slices, lay them and the oysters in layers; se...
-Pickled Oysters
Put two dozen of large oysters into a stew-pan over a fire, with their liquor only, and boil them five minutes; then strain the liquor into another stew-pan, and add to it a bay-leaf, a little cayenn...
-How To Make Oyster Powder
Open the oysters carefully, so as not to cut them, except in dividing the gristle, which attaches the shells; put them into a mortar, and when you have got as many as you can conveniently pound at on...
-How To Make Oysters On Toast
Open oysters, put them in a pan with their liquor, a quarter of a teaspoonful of pepper, a wine glass of milk, two cloves, and a small piece of mace, if handy; boil a few minutes until set; mix one o...
-How To Make Oyster Ketchup
Pound the fish, and add to each pint of them one pint of sherry wine, one ounce of salt, powdered mace two drachms, pepper one drachm. Boil up, skim, strain; add to each pint two tea-spoonfuls of bra...
-Fam. Patellidae. Patella, - Limpet.Patella vulgata, Linnaeus. Limpet
Shell oval and conical in shape; apex central, or nearly so, strong, sometimes with ribs diverging from the apex to the margin, and sometimes quite smooth. Colours various,pale greyish-yellow or green...
-How To Cook Limpets
Boil them for a few minutes, and take care that the soft part is not broken, as it spoils them; this part is more liable to be broken in the autumn. Limpet Soup Wash them, and free the shells fr...
-Fam. Haliotidae. Haliotis. - Bar-Shell, Or Sea-Ear.Haliotis tuberculata, Linnaeus. Ear-shell, or Venus's Ear
Shell ear-shaped; short flat spire, lateral, and nearly concealed; aperture wide; a longitudinal row of perforations on the left margin; the interior pearly and iridiscent. * 'British Conchology,' ...
-Fam. Haliotidae. Haliotis. Continued
Mr. G. R. Corner mentions a very elegant cup in the possession of the Queen, made of staves of turbo-shell mounted on a stem and foot of silver gilt. He also adds that the polished, but unmounted turb...
-How To Dress Sea-Ears To Perfection
Take them out of the shells, and well scrub them; then let them simmer for two or three hours, until they are quite tender, after which they may be scalloped as an oyster, or put into the pan to brow...
-Fam. Littoridae. Littorina. - Periwinkle.Littorina littorea, Linnaeus. Periwinkle
Shell spiral, solid; whorls six or seven in number, covered with longitudinal stria?; apex very pointed; aperture nearly round and large; pillar lip flat, broad, and white; outer lip sharp, sometimes ...
-How To Cook Periwinkles
Periwinkle Soup Take a pint and a half or a quart of periwinkles, wash them well, and boil them in a saucepan with a handful or two of salt, to enable you to pick out the fish easily. Put a little ...
-Fam. Muricidae. Buccinum. - Whelk.Buccinum undatum, Linnaeus. Whelk
Shell ovate, with eight whorls, more or less inflated, covered with transverse coarse striae; waved or undulated obliquely, covered with a yellowish-brown epidermis; length about four inches. The aper...
-Fam. Muricidae. Buccinum. Part 2
We are told that in the island of Tanna, in the New-Hebrides, shell trumpets are blown as signals to the disease-makers, or sorcerers, to entreat them to stop plaguing their victims. These disease-m...
-Fam. Muricidae. Buccinum. Part 3
Dr. Troost, in an account of some ancient remains discovered by him in Tennesee, mentions the finding of a large conch shell (Cassis flammea), with the interior whorls and columella removed, so that n...
-Fam. Muricidae. Buccinum. Part 4
We all know the story of the discovery of the Por-phyra shellfish, by the dog of a Tyrian nymph loved by Hercules; which having picked up some of these shells, and crushed them with its teeth, its mou...
-Fam. Muricidae. Buccinum. Part 5
In 'Religious Ceremonies,' p. 309, we are told that the Pope celebrates Mass in Lent, Advent, and all eves on which fasting is required, in a purple robe. Other shellfish produce purple dyes; among...
-How To Make Whelk Soup
Take two onions and cut them into small dice, fry them in a stew-pan with some butter; shake the pan well for a few minutes, add five heads of celery, two handfuls of spinach, two cabbage-lettuces cut...
-Fam. Helicidae. Helix. - Snail.Helix pomatia, Linnaeus. Vine Snail
Shell globular, strong, large, covered with coarse longitudinal striae, five volutions, convex; spire short, and the apex blunt; pale cream-colour, with rufous bands; the columella arched; and of a pa...
-Helix Pisana, Linnaeus. The Banded Snail
Shell rather depressed, and near]y globular, of a pale yellowish-white, with spiral bands of a dark chocolate-brown, which are not always joined together, giving the shell a speckled or streaky appea...
-Another Soueraigne Medicine For A Web In The Eye
Take a good quantitie of snailes with their shells upon them, and wash them very well, and then distill them in a common stillatorie; then take of the galles of Hares, Red currall, and Sugar-candie, ...
-Decoctwm Antiphthisicum, A Decoction Against Consumptions
Take ox-eye daisy flowers, dried, a handful; snails, washed clean, numb three; candied eryngo-root, half an ounce; pearl-barley, two ounces; boil in spring-water from a pound to half a pound, and then...
-For A Consumption
Take twelve snails, better house snails, and twelve earthworms, clean washed; boil them in a pint of new milk to half a pint, then pour it on one ounce of eryngo-root. Take some every night and morni...
-An Admirable And Most Famous Snail Water
Take a peck of garden snails, wash them well in small beer, and put them in a hot oven till they have done making a noise, then take thern out, and wipe them well from the green froth that is upon the...
-An Excellent Snail-Water
Take of comfrey and succory-roots, of each four ounces, liquorice, three ounces, the leaves of hart's-tongue, plantain, ground-ivy, red-nettle, yarrow, brooklime, watercresses, dandelion, and agrimon...
-Mock Asses Milk
One pound of snails layed in salt and water for two days, and then cleaned and washed, a quarter of a pound of barley, three pennyworth of eryngo-root; boil all the above together, till they become a...
-Mucilaginous Broth
Put a cut-up chicken, a pound of veal cutlet, and a calf's foot into a stew-pan, with three pints of water, boil and skim; then add a dozen crayfish and a pint of garden snails, both bruised and raw,...
-Popular Spanish Cure For The Headache
Make a poultice of bruised snails. They must be broken up with their shells and put into a piece of linen folded four times so as to make it thick, dip it in brandy, and squeeze it tolerably dry; then...
-For An Impostume (Whitlow)
Take a snail out of its shell, and bruising it small, pound it into a plaster and apply it to the finger; it will ripen and break it, and it should then be dressed like any other wound. For a patient...
-For An Impostume (Whitlow). Part 2
Fulvius Hirpinus studied the art of fattening them with so much success, that some of his snails would contain about ten quarts. Pliny in his letter to Sextus Erucius Clarus, says (complainiug of his ...
-For An Impostume (Whitlow). Part 3
Dr. Ebrard adds that, during the famine of 1816 and 1817, snails were most valuable articles of food to the inhabitants of Central France; again, that from the coasts of Saintonge and Aunis, snails ha...
-For An Impostume (Whitlow). Part 4
We read that formerly, in Paris, snails were only to be found in the herbalists' shops, and at the chemists'; but now there are special places for them in the fish markets, by the side of the crayfish...
-For An Impostume (Whitlow). Part 5
Sir Gardner Wilkinson has seen basketsful of snails carried about for sale in the streets in Cairo; and in ' Physical Geography of the Holy Land,' it is stated that they are occasionally eaten in Syri...
-How To Dress Snails
Take shell-snails, put them in boiling water, then pick them out of the shells, salt them, scour the slime from them, and then wash them in two or three waters; then dry them in a linen cloth, then pu...
-Snails Cooked The French Way
Crack the shells and throw them into boiling water, with a little salt and herbs, sufficient to make the whole savoury; in a quarter of an hour take them out, pick the snails from the shells, and boil...
-How To Bake Snails
Boil them, scour them, season them with salt, pepper, and nutmeg; lay them into a pye with marrow, a raw chicken cut in pieces, bits of lard, and bacon without bone, whole mace, savoury herbs shred, ...
-Another Recipe From The Same Source
Scald the snails to get rid of their shells, and then fry them with a few crumbs of bread, and a little seasoning, viz., pepper, salt, and a finish of fine herbs, or stew them with white or brown sauc...
-French Recipe For Dressing Snails
In spring and autumn, the snails which are found in the vineyards are good to eat, for those who like them; and to clean them and make them easy to get out of the shell they must be dressed as follows...
-Another Method Of Cooking Snails
In the north and east of France, Helix pomatia, or Helices vigneronnes, the vine snails, are boiled in water, and taken out of their shells, then stewed in a saucepan with some fresh butter and parsle...
-Fam. Sepiadae. Sepia. - Cuttle.Sepia officinalis, Linnaeus. Common Cuttle-fish, or Scuttle
The animal is curious, very flat, with white stripes across its body, the groundwork being dark brown. The head is brown, as well as the arms, but the inside of the latter is white, and is furnished w...
-Fam. Sepiadae. Sepia. Part 2
M. Verany further states that the fishermen catch the large ones with the leister, or trident, and in summer the young Poülps are caught with a line weighted with lead, furnished with a cork fitted wi...
-Fam. Sepiadae. Sepia. Part 3
According to Mr. H. Woodward, the undigested remains of fossil cuttle-fishes are frequently noticed within the ribs of the Ichthyosauri, and Plesiosauri of our Lias.* Mr. A. E. Verrill thinks it proba...
-Fam. Sepiadae. Sepia. Part 4
Pliny mentions several kinds of polypi, one of which he especially calls the land polypus, and states that it is larger than that of the sea; and Hardouin says it is the species found on the seashore,...
-Fam. Sepiadae. Sepia. Part 5
This story is said to be translated from a small ill-printed pamphlet sold by the priests of the temple, all the decorations of which, even to the bronze lantern in the middle of the court-yard, are i...
-How To Cook Cuttles (Mont St. Michel Recipe)
First place them in boiling water and allow them to remain sometime in order to make them tender. Then cut them in pieces and boil them with vegetables and onions, then fry them in a paste made of bat...
-Weymouth Recipe For Cooking Common Cuttle, Or Scuttle
Cut off the head and feelers, and take out the white bone; then boil for a short time till tender - generally ten minutes or so will suffice. It is said to taste like lobster. Alexis, in his 'Wicke...
-Montpellier Method Of Cooking Sepiola Rondeletii
Stuff it with a force-meat of fish, then fry the arms and cut them in pieces, and place them round the dish.* In Spain the cuttle-fishes (Sepiola and Loligo ?) Ca-lamares are eaten, either broiled ...
-Fam. Cidaridae. Echinus. - Sea. Egg.Echinus sphaera, Müller. Common Sea-egg, or Sea-urchin
A wish has been expressed that I should in-clude the Sea-egg in my 'Edible Mollusca,' but I scarcely feel justified in doing so, as it is not a mollusk, and has no other claim to appear on these pag...
-How To Cook Echini
Boil them as you would boil eggs, and eat them with sippets of bread. Generally considered in season in the autumn. The sea-egg becomes red like a crab when it is cooked, and is said to resemble it...
-List Of Works Referred To, Or Consulted, In The Preparation Of This Work
'A Book for the Seaside'. 'A Thousand Notable Things, of sundrie sorts, whereof some are wonderfull, some strange, some pleasant, divers necessary, etc, etc. At London, printed by J. Roberts, for ...
-List Of Works Referred To. Part 2
Evelyn's 'Memoirs.' Edited by W. Brey, Esq. 'Every Day's Needs.' A collection of well-proven recipes, furnished by the ladies of the Business Woman's Union, Brooklyn, N.Y. Faber, G. L.: 'The Fis...
-List Of Works Referred To. Part 3
Neumann's 'Chemistry'. Nichols' 'Forty Years in America.' 2 vols. Nicolas, Sir N. H.: ' History of the Royal Navy.' 2 vols. 'Nineteenth Century,' Sept., 1883. Memories of Ischia, by Dr. W. ...
-Errata
Page 1, line 5, for Pholas Dactylus, read Pholas dactylus. ,, 6, line 15, for masilius, read Marsilius. 11, note, for moluses, read molluscs. 13, line 28, for Solen Siliqua, r...
-List Of Works On Natural History, Topography Antiquity, And Science. Contents
Botany Page 3 Ferns 8 Mosses 8 FUNGOLOGY 9 Seaweeds 9 ...
-Botany
The Species of Ficus of the Indo-Malayan and Chinese Countries. By George King, M.B., LL.D., F.L.S. Part L, Small folio, 91 Plates in Portfolio, 25s. Part II., 137 Plates in Portfolio, 40s. Appendi...
-Ferns
British Ferns; an Introduction to the Study of the Ferns, Lycopods, and Equiseta indigenous to the British Isles. With Chapters on the Structure, Propagation, Cultivation, Diseases, Uses, Preservation...
-Mosses
Synopsis of British Mosses, containing Descriptions of all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. Hobkirk, F.L.S., etc, etc. New E...
-Fungi
British Fungi, Phycomycetes and Ustilagineae. By George Massee (Lecturer on Botany to the London Society for the Extension of University Teaching). Crown 8?o, with 8 Plates, 7s. 6d. Outlines of ...
-Seaweeds
British Seaweeds; an Introduction to the Study of the Marine AlgAE of Great Britain, Ireland, and the Channel Islands. By S. 0. Gray. Crown 8vo, with 16 Coloured Plates, 10s. 6d. Phycologia Britann...
-Shells And Mollusks
Elements of Conchology; an Introduction to the Natural History of Shells, and of the Animals which form them. By Lovell Reeve, F.L.S. Royal 8vo, Two Vols., 62 Coloured Plates, £2 16s. Conchologia I...
-Entomology
The Coleoptera of the British Islands. A Descriptive Account of the Families, Genera, and Species indigenous to Great Britain and Ireland, with Notes as to Localities, Habitats, etc. By the Rev. W....
-Zoology
British Zoophytes; an Introduction to the Hydroida, Actinozoa, and Polyzoa found in Great Britain, Ireland, and the Channel Islands. By Arthur S. Pennington, F.L.S. Crown 8vo, 24 Plates, 10s. 6d. H...
-Miscellaneous
Collections and Recollections of Natural History and Sport in the Life of a Country Vicar. By the Rev. G. C. Green. Illustrated with Woodcuts from Sketches by the Author. Crown 8vo, 7s. 6d. West Yo...







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