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How To Cook Well | by J. Rosalie Benton



In the following collection of receipts some are entirely original; many are contributed by friends; others are wellknown favorites which have stood the test of time; and the rest are similar to those found in trustworthy cook books, but altered after trial, according to taste. To those who have generously given their choice receipts to add to the attractions of "How to Cook Well," public acknowledgment and thanks are here rendered.

TitleHow To Cook Well
AuthorJ. Rosalie Benton
PublisherD. Lothrop & Company
Year1886
Copyright1886, D. Lothrop & Company
AmazonHow To Cook Well

"With baked and boiled, and stewed and toasted, And fried and broiled, and smoked and roasted, We treat the town."

Salmagundi.

To My Little Daughter Margaret this book is lovingly dedicated

-Preface
In the following collection of receipts some are entirely original; many are contributed by friends; others are wellknown favorites which have stood the test of time; and the rest are similar to those...
-Explanatory Notes
The measurements given in this book are exact, no deviation from them being allowed for. When the expression, one cupful or one teaspoonful, is used, it means that the cup or spoon is to be filled eve...
-Tables Of Weights And Measures
Table Of Approximate Weights And Measures 1 qt. sifted flour, about .... 1 lb. 1 tablespoonful butter, about. 1 oz. 1 qt. pulverized sugar . . 1 lb. 7 oz. 1 q...
-How To Boil
Allow plenty of water, unless the directions for some exceptional thing are given to the contrary. Do not allow the water to boil down enough to expose to the air what you are cooking. If it should, f...
-How To Fry
This is a process but little understood, though used extensively by those who know least about cooking. The most necessary point is the one they will not attend to, and that is, to have the frying-pan...
-How To Try Out Fat Or Suet
Save all the fat from beef, raw or cooked. Cut it in small pieces. Put it in a frying-pan with but just enough water to keep it from burning. Put it over a slow fire; stir occasionally and let it all ...
-How to Egg-and-Crumb
Croquettes and other things to be boiled in lard, or fried, are often prepared thus: Roll fine stale crackers or bread-crumbs. Then sift them on to a large plate. In another large plate have one or t...
-How To Broil
Heat and grease a gridiron. Never cook anything on a cold gridiron. Lay on the steak (or whatever it is) and cover with an inverted pan to keep in the heat and flavor. Turn often while cooking, but do...
-General Directions
How To Blanch Almonds Shell the nuts, pour boiling water over them and let them stand a few minutes. Then remove the skins, which will slip off easily. Dry them in a towel. How To Wash Currants Z...
-Remarks On Breakfast
Breakfast ought to be made a very pleasant meal, beginning the day, as it does, after the family have been separated for the night. Yet t in how many families is it the custom to send off the master o...
-Cereals
Boiled Oatmeal 1 cup oatmeal. 1 1/2 quarts cold water. 1 1/2 teaspoonfuls salt. Do not wash oatmeal. Put it on, with the water and salt, in a double-boiler and let it boil hard till all the water ...
-Eggs
Boiled Eggs Have ready a kettle of boiling water. Wash, and put each egg into the water with a tablespoon so as not to crack the shell. Be sure that the water more than covers the eggs and is not boi...
-Eggs. Part 2
Eggs Poached In Oil (A New Orleans Receipt.) Olive oil. Eggs-Mushrooms, cooked and chopped. Onions, sliced fine. Capers. Parsley. Beef stock, or mushroom water. Put just enough olive oil in a ...
-Eggs. Part 3
Another With Raw Eggs 1/2 cup soaked crumbs. Any kind cold meat, minced. A little minced parsley. 6 eggs, well beaten. 3 tablespoonfuls cream. 1 tablespoonful butter, melted. Pepper, and a pinch o...
-Omelets
Fried Omelet (No. 1) To each person allow two eggs ; and to each egg allow one tablespoonful of milk, a pinch of pepper and half a saltspoonful of salt. Beat yolks and whites separately, adding the m...
-Hash
Hash can be varied in a number of ways. Remove all fat and gristle from cold meat, and chop it very fine if to be used without potato, coarser, if with. Chop the potatoes separately, using rather more...
-Meats For Breakfast
Remarks In warming over cold meat and bringing it to the table under various attractive forms a real art is hidden. Hut do not despise learning it. You will be repaid by the absence of the greasy, un...
-Meats For Breakfast. Part 2
A King Of Meat. (A Swiss Dish.) Butter a pudding-dish. Invert a cup in the centre. Make a ring around it of cold meat, minced and seasoned with pepper, salt, and powdered herbs. Pour over it enough g...
-Meats For Breakfast. Part 3
Baked Sausages Put in the oven in a baking-tin, turning when necessary, just as if you were frying them. Brown them well; they are less greasy than if fried,and are more delicate in every way. Apples...
-Escaloped Fish
Boil about two pounds of any kind of fish; or use fish left from dinner. Pick it to shreds with a knife and fork, while you prepare the following sauce: 1 quart milk. 1 onion. 1 bunch parsley. ...
-Salmon
Salmon a L'lndienne Broil a salmon steak. While it is broiling make the following sauce: Put a small piece of butter in a sauce-pan. When melted, dredge in a little curry powder, and a little flour....
-Codfish
Codfish Puff Make a mixture as for Codfish Balls. Put into a buttered earthen plate, and smooth over the top. Cover with bits of butter, and bake in a very hot oven till brown (about ten minutes). ...
-Halibut
Halibut (Baked) Buy either a thick slice as for boiling, or thinner ones as for frying. In the latter case, pile them up with lumps of butter between the slices. Put several lumps of butter in the b...
-Mackerel
(See Broiled Fish.) It takes fifteen minutes to broil. Or, it may be fried. (See Fried Fish.) Allow nearly half an hour to fry it, if large and thick. Do not have the fire too hot at first. Bro...
-Miscellaneous Dishes #2
Fried Apples Peel and slice five or six sour apples, not very thin. Have ready in a frying-pan several thin pieces of salt pork fried to a crisp. Put in the apples and fry over a slow fire, stirring ...
-Potatoes
Baked Potatoes Wash large, smooth potatoes of about the same size. Bake in a moderately hot oven for about one hour. Turn them three or four times, so that they will be evenly done. Eat at once. Cold...
-Potatoes. Part 2
Fried Sweet Potatoes Slice cold parboiled potatoes lengthwise, into slices a quarter of an inch thick, and fry to a delicate brown in dripping, lard or butter. Cold baked sweet potatoes should he ch...
-Potatoes. Part 3
Maitre D'hotel Potato Cold boiled potatoes. 1/2 cupful milk. 3 tablespoonfuls butter. Pepper and salt. Chopped parsley. 1/2 lemon (juice only). Put the milk and butter into a sauce-pan already hot,...
-Parsnips
Boiled Parsnips Wash and boil in cold salted water from three quarters to one hour. When tender, skin them, split in half, and lay them in a dish, buttering plentifully. Serve covered. On no account...
-Cucumbers
Stewed Cucumbers Prepare as for Raw Cucumbers, but slice thick. Take out the seeds; put into enough boiling water to cover them, and stew fifteen minutes. Then drain off the water. Add enough fresh...
-Tomatoes
Stewed Tomatoes Pour scalding water over the tomatoes. Let them stand a minute. Then skin them. Quarter them, and extract the cores. Put them in a sauce-pan (not a tin one). Cover and stew slowly wit...
-Onions
Fried Onions With Eggs Peel and quarter eight onions, and soak in cold water for awhile. Then put them in a frying-pan with a little water and one cupful of pork gravy (or a little lard). Scatter one...
-Other Dishes For Breakfast
(See Index.) Beefsteak Mutton and Lamb Chops. Veal Cutlets. Stews (of all kinds) Mutton a la Venison. Croquettes, Meat Balls, etc. Baked Potatoes. German Potatoes. Mashed Potato Balls. Baked Toma...
-Muffins
Plain Muffins 1 egg beaten light. 1 1/2 cupfuls milk. 2 tablespoonfuls butter (melted). 1 teaspoonful salt. 1/2 teaspoonful soda (dis-solved). 1 teaspoonful cream of tartar. Flour to make a thick...
-Graham Gems
2 eggs, well beaten. 1 table spoonful sugar. 1 teaspoonful salt. 2 cupfuls milk. 2 cupfuls Graham flour. Mix in order. Beat hard. Heat gem-pans very hot. Pour in the mixture, and bake in a pretty h...
-Corn Bread
2 cupfuls sour milk (or butter-milk). 2 tablespoonfuls sugar. 2 tablespoonfuls Hour. 1 egg beaten light. 1 teaspoonful soda dissolved. 1 teaspoonful salt. Corn meal to make a thick batter. Be sure n...
-Sally Lunn
2 eggs beaten light. 1/2 teaspoonful salt. 3 cupfuls flour. 2 teaspoonfuls cream tartar. 1 cupful milk. 1 teaspoonful soda dissolved. 3 flat tablespoonfuls butter, melted. Put in the flour and mil...
-Breakfast And Tea Cakes
Remarks Before you begin to mix the cakes grease the pans, and leave them to heat. They should be very hot before pouring in the mixture, which should not be allowed to stand after it is ready. The o...
-Breakfast Cake
Plain Breakfast Cake 1 quart flour (scant). 4 teaspoonfuls cream tartar. 1 teaspoonful salt. 1/4 cup sugar (or less). 1 pint milk. 2tcaspoonfuls soda dissolved. 2 eggs (beaten light). Mix thorough...
-Short Cake
3 teaspoonfuls baking powder 1 cupful butter (or half lard). 1 cupful hot milk (full). Mix as directed for Baking Powder Biscuit. Roll out lightly on the bread-board (adding no more flour) about ...
-Griddle Cakes, Etc
Remarks If possible, procure a soapstone griddle. It needs no greasing, and therefore makes no disagreeable smell through the house. If you have only an ordinary griddle and must use grease, do it wi...
-Buckwheat Cakes
Unequalled Buckwheat Cakes 1 quart buckwheat floor. 2 tablespoonfuls wheat flour. 1 teaspoonful salt. 1 1/2 cup fuls yeast. 1 pint fresh milk (warm). 1/2 pint warm water. Set them at nine o'cloc...
-Griddle Cakes
Oatmeal Griddle Cakes. (No Eggs Or Milk.) 2 cups flour. 2 teaspoonfuls baking pow-der. 1 teaspoonful salt. 2 cups cold boiled oatmeal. 2 tablespoonfuls molasses. 2 1/2 cups water (more or less). T...
-Slapjacks
Pour over four cupfuls corn meal sufficient boiling water to make it very damp. Mix well. Add 1 or 2 eggs beaten light. 2 cupfuls milk. 2 1/2 teaspoonfuls salt. 1 tablespoonful molasses. 1 cupful ...
-Pancakes
1 pint flour. 1/2 teaspoonful salt. 3/4 teaspoonful baking-powder. 1 quart milk. 3 eggs, beaten very light. Mix the dry things thoroughly together. Then add the milk, stirring it in till the batter...
-Flannel Cakes
1 quart milk. 1 teaspoonful salt. 3 tablespoonfuls yeast. Flour to make a rather thick batter. Piece butter size of an egg. 2eggs, well beaten. Beat hard together the first four ingredients at n...
-Waffles
1 pint sour or buttermilk. 1 teaspoonful salt. 3 teaspoonfuls melted butter. 3 eggs (separated). Flour to make a thick batter. 1 teaspoonful soda (dissolved). Beat all together, adding the soda ...
-Luncheon
Remarks In many families it is the custom for the ladies to have lunch in the middle of the day, and to reserve the more hearty meal of dinner till the gentlemen have returned from business and can s...
-Macaroni
Boiled Macaroni To a quarter of a pound of macaroni allow one dessertspoonful of salt. Put it in a deep sauce-pan, having broken it into convenient lengths. Pour over it as much boiling water as the ...
-Sandwiches
Butter bread (a day old) on the loaf. Spread with a little made mustard or Salad Dressing, if you have any. Cut the bread very thin. When two slices are ready, lay them together, with thin shavings ...
-Dolmathes
Dolmathes. (A Turkish Dish.) Rare roast beef, or any cold meat. Salt. Pepper. Ground cinnamon. Ground cloves. Rice, raw and well washed. Tender grape-leaves. Mince the meat and season as above. ...
-Miscellaneous Dishes
Lambs' Tongues With Sauce Piquante Parboil fresh tongues in salted water. Remove the skin. Dredge with salt, pepper, and flour. Put in a sauce-pan, and half cover with water or stock. Add a small oni...
-Miscellaneous Dishes. Continued
Mutton A La Venison 4 slices cold roast mutton. 1 cupful cold mutton-gravy. 2 tablespoonfuls currant jelly. 1 teaspoonful made mustard. Pepper and salt. 2 tablespoonfuls Madeira or currant wine. ...
-Pressed Beef
Beef Loaf 1 pound raw beef (from the round). 1 egg beaten light. 4 tablespoonfuls powdered crackers. 1 1/2 salt. A little pepper. 1 dessert spoonful summer savory. 1 dessert spoonful thyme. C...
-Pressed Meats
Head Cheese Wash and scrape four hogs' heads, and cut off the end of the snouts. Scrape and clean the skins which have come off the fat of the backbones and chines. Use the feet also if you like. Pu...
-Pressed Chicken
A pair of old fowls may be utilized in this way. Cut them up, after cleaning and washing, and put into a deep kettle with four quarts of cold water. Cover tightly so as to keep in the steam. Boil slow...
-Croquettes, Meat Balls, Etc
Remarks If these are made of meat, it should be previously cooked. In boiling chickens (or other meat) for croquettes, save the water used for cooking them, to make soup. Fairly good croquettes can b...
-Fish Croquettes
Pound in a mortar, any kind of cold, boiled fish; mix with it a hard boiled egg, chopped fine. Make a batter, in the proportion of one tablespoonful of milk, two of flour, and one egg beaten light, wi...
-Croquettes
Potato Croquettes 2 cupfuls mashed potato. A little milk or cream. A little melted butter. 1 egg (yolk only). 1/4 of a nutmeg, nearly (may be omitted). A large pinch cayenne pepper. A little sa...
-Croquettes. Continued
Veal Croquettes (Simpler) Chop cold veal very fine. Add salt and pepper and a little ground mace or sage. (Also, a minced onion, if you like it.) Moisten slightly with gravy. With floured hands, make...
-Meat Balls
These may be made of any kind of cold meat, chopped line, seasoned highly, and moistened with a little gravy or one egg (yolk only) beaten light. With floored hands form into balls, flatten the top an...
-Codfish Balls
Soak the codfish over night, and let it simmer till tender. (See Stewed Codfish.) Tick the fish into shreds, freeing it from all bits of bone. To one part fish, put two parts hot boiled potatoes. Mash...
-Fish Balls
Take half cold or hot mashed potato and half fresh fish (any kind, cooked). Chop the fish into the potato, and mix well. Season to taste. Moisten with milk (or Fish Sauce, or Drawn Butter, if you ...
-Rice Balls
1 pint cold boiled rice. A little salt. 1 tablespoonful melted butter. 1 tablespoonful flour. 1 egg (may be omitted). Mix together, having beaten the egg. Make into floured balls, flatten them, an...
-Pates
Make a good Puff Paste. Set it in a cold place, for at least half an hour, to become crisp. Roll it out quickly about one quarter of an inch thick, cut with a biscuit-cutter into rounds. With a smal...
-Oyster Pates
Oyster Pates. (No. 1.) With a sharp knife cut oysters into pieces. Heat them in a little of their own liquor, just enough to cover them. Make a Drawn Butter sauce, and stir the minced oysters into ...
-Fritters
Remarks Do not attempt to make fritters unless you have plenty of time. It will take half an hour to fry enough for a small family, and they must be watched carefully if you aim at success. Before m...
-Fritters. Continued
Potato Fritters 4 cupfuls mashed potato. 3/4 teaspoonful salt. pound butter (melted). 1 pint milk. 1cupful flour. 2eggs (well beaten). Beat to a stiff batter. Boil in deep lard, dropping in the...
-Other Dishes For Luncheon
(See Index.) Bouillon, etc. Stick bread. Fresh fish (all kinds). Canned salmon (various ways). Oysters and clams (various ways). Chicken, lamb or veal Curry. Game and poultry. Meat pies. Stea...
-Dinner Soup
Remarks The best housekeepers consider no dinner well ordered which is not begun by soup ; but even where this practice does not prevail, for the sake of economy soup should appear on the table once ...
-Seasonings, Thickenings, And Accompaniments To Soup
Spices, Etc Sweet marjoram and cloves are suited to any darkcolored soup; summer savory and sage to that which is light-colored. Mace particularly suits chicken and oyster soups. Never put nutmeg or ...
-Bean Soup
Black Bean Soup 1 cup black kidney beans. 3 pints cold water. 1 quart stock. Salt and pepper. 1/2 teaspoonful cloves, ground. 1 hard-boiled 1 lemon. Soak the beans over night; then put them in the ...
-Tomato Soup
Spiced Tomato Soup 2 quarts Stock. 1 1/2 table spoonfuls raw rice (washed). 1 pint Stewed Tomatoes (or canned). Pepper and salt. A few whole cloves. Put the Stock on to boil, or use water in...
-Soups
Stock For Soup Remarks on Soup will tell what meat is best to buy. Have the bones well cracked. Weigh them and the meat together. To each pound, put one and one half quarts of cold water, and allow...
-Soups. Part 2
Veal Soup A knuckle of veal (weighing about 3 pounds). 4 quarts cold water. 1/3 cup tapioca, soaked. Boil the veal with the water about three hours, and set it away. When cold, skim it. Bring it to ...
-Soups. Part 3
White Soup 1 quart chicken broth ( or any clear stock). 1 1/4 cupfuls cream or milk. 1 egg (yolk only) or l 1/2 tablespoonfuls mashed po-tato. Pepper and salt. Croutons (may be omitted). Heat to...
-Soups. Part 4
Vegetable Soup 2 potatoes. 1/2 a small turnip. 2 medium-sized carrots. 1 large onion (minced). 1 stick celery (minced). 1 quart water. 2quarts rich Stock. Pepper and salt. Grate fine the pot...
-Soups. Part 5
Another 5 or 6 potatoes pared. 3 or 4 large sticks celery. 4 inches square salt pork. 1 large tablespoonful butter Milk. Parsley (may be omitted). Croutons. An hour before dinner put to boil the ...
-Fish
Remarks Fish is not fit to eat unless fresh, or frozen. If frozen it may be kept for weeks in winter, but be sure not to let it thaw till immediately before cooking it. Then lay it in cold water for ...
-Fish. Part 2
Fish Au Court Bouillon 3 pounds fish of any kind. 1 1/2 tablespoonfuls butter. 1/2 pint chopped onions. 2 tablespoonfuls Browned Flour. 1 pint chopped tomatoes. 1 pint water. 1/2 pint claret wi...
-Fish. Part 3
Fried Fish Wash the fish and wipe dry. Lay them in a towel long enough to absorb the moisture, then rub them with salt, and dredge with flour, or roll in corn-meal. Have ready five or six slices of s...
-Fish. Part 4
Casserole Of Fish 1 cupful cold fish. A little milk. A lump of butter. 1cupful mashed potato. 2hard-boiled eggs, sliced. Salt and pepper. Flake the fish and moisten it with the milk and butter. Bu...
-Fish. Part 5
Stewed Eels Skin and clean, removing all the fat from the inside; cut into pieces less than two inches long; stew slowly in cold salted water enough to cover them, for one hour. Add then one tablespo...
-Shad
Broiled Shad (See To Broil Fish.) It will take twenty minutes to broil shad ; longer if the fish is large. Increase the heat towards the last, so that the fish will be done through. Delicate Sh...
-Chowder
Fish Chowder 5 pounds codfish or sea-bass. 1 pound salt pork (chopped). 4 or 5 onions (sliced). 3 large potatoes (sliced). A few pounded crackers. A few whole crackers. Milk or water. Pepper and sal...
-Clams
How To Open Clams Wash them clean. Then put them in a deep kettle, with a very little water in the bottom. Cover close and set on the fire. When the water boils and the steam rises the shells will op...
-Oysters
Raw Oysters Wash the shells thoroughly, and wipe dry. Open them, remove the upper shell, but leave the other, with the oyster in it. Place them on a platter, with two lemons cut in quarters. Serve pe...
-Oysters. Part 2
Oysters Fried In Oil Select large oysters, firm-fleshed and highly flavored. Drain and thoroughly dry them on a towel. Beat up an equal bulk of eggs and cream, and a little salt. Dip the oysters very...
-Oysters. Part 3
Pickled Oysters 100 oysters (fresh). 1 pint best white wine vinegar. 1 medium-sized onion (chopped fine). 1 ounce whole black peppers. 1/2 ounce whole allspice. 1/2 teaspoonful salt. Scald the oyst...
-Oysters. Part 4
Oysters A La Royale Bake a few oysters in a pan, in the oven, for a few moments, till they ruffle; no longer. Have ready slices of hot toast, spread on both sides with butter, into which a little cur...
-Lobsters
How To Open Lobsters The best time of the year for lobster, is when oysters are out of season ; that is, late in spring, and through the summer. Buy a lobster already boiled, and as fresh as possible...
-Stewed Terrapins
Boil the terrapins (in boiling water) till the shell can be easily taken off. Dissect them, removing the sand-bags and head (all the rest is good), taking great care to remove the gall, which is found...
-Salads
Remarks Keep the lettuce or celery to be used for salads in a cool place, and do not add it till shortly before it is to be served, or it will be wilted. Never attempt to make salad dressing in a hu...
-Salads. Continued
Ham Salad Chop fine cold boiled ham. Pour a Salad Dressing over it, and serve in a dish lined and ornamented with lettuce leaves. Another Way is to season the chopped ham with pepper and mustard. ...
-Mayonnaise Dressing
Mayonnaise Dressing. (No. 1.) 1egg (yolk only). 2saltspoonfuls salt. A pinch black pepper. 1/3 teaspoonful dry mustard. A dash cayenne pepper. 1/2 cupful salad oil. A few drops lemon juice (or vi...
-Chicken Salad
Boil the chickens and let them get cold. They need not be young ones. Remove skin, bones, gristle, and fat, and cut the meat into small pieces (chopping makes it too fine). Cut celery stalks into very...
-Tomato Sauce
(For Chops, Beefsteak, Cutlets or Fish.) 1/2 can tomatoes. 1 cupful water (or stock). 2 cloves 1 teaspoonful herbs, mixed. 1 sprig parsley, minced (may be omitted). 1 teaspoonful salt. A little ...
-Lobster Sauce
Lobster Sauce. (No 1.) (For Boiled Fish or Poultry.) Buy a boiled lobster. Pick out all the spawn and red coral. Pound these in a mortar. Moisten them with a spoonful of hot water, and one of melte...
-Stuffing, Gravy, Sauces, Etc
Stuffing. (For Turkey, Chicken, Veal, Lamb, Or Fish.) Soak in boiling water, and squeeze pieces of stale bread or dried crumbs. Then mix together thoroughly the fol lowing, putting in the butter whil...
-Stuffing, Gravy, Sauces, Etc. Part 2
Gravy For Roast Meat Half an hour before dinner pour all the drippings out of the pan in which the meat is roasting, and set it within a pan of cold water in a very cold place, for the fat to rise. P...
-Stuffing, Gravy, Sauces, Etc. Part 3
Bread Sauce (For Boast Poultry and Game.) 1 pint milk. 1 onion, minced. 1 cupful bread-crumbs. Pepper and salt to taste. A pinch of mace. 3 tablespoonfuls butter. Simmer the onion in the milk ...
-Poultry
How To Select Poultry Old turkeys and fowls have hard, scaly feet and legs. To be sure of getting young ones, choose those that have smooth legs and moist feet. (Yellow-legged chickens ard considered...
-Turkey
Boast Turkey (See To Prepare Poultry.) Put it in the dripping-pan; pour one cupful boiling water over the top; dredge with flour, and put it in the oven, with a slow fire, allowing twenty minutes ...
-Chickens
Roast Chickens Just like Roast Turkey. Roast nearly one hour and a half. This is better than to hurry them in a hot oven, as chickens should be well done inside. Boiled Chickens Just like Boi...
-Stewed Fowl With Oysters
(A Canadian Receipt.) Choose a young fowl. Fill the inside with oysters. Put it in a jar or tin pail without water and cover tight. Put the jar in a large pot of boiling water, and boil steadily for ...
-Ducks
Wild Ducks (Roasted) Clean at once and wash well. Lay an onion in each and parboil them for ten minutes. This will take away the strong, disagreeable flavor. Throw away the onion and stuff the ducks....
-Pigeons
Roast Pigeons The birds must be young and tender for this purpose. Clean them and put a little piece of butter in them, stuff and truss them. Tie thin slices of bacon over the breast. Lay them in row...
-Prairie Chickens
Prairie Chickens Or Grouse Roasted Prepare and roast like chickens, but rub the inside of each with melted butter, and put butter in the stuffing. Add butter to the water in the pan when you baste th...
-Quail
Quail On Toast Clean and cut the quail down the back. Salt, pepper and dredge them with flour. Break the breast and back bones, so that they will lie flat. Then place them in a pan, with a very littl...
-Game
Potted Partridges Stuff and truss partridges as you do fowls, and flour them. Melt a spoonful of butter in a small pot, and then dredge in a spoonful of flour. When it is browned, lay in the partridg...
-Venison
Venison Steak (Broiled) Heat a gridiron and butter it. Lay the steaks on it, over a clear, hot fire. Turn them often (without piercing them with a fork, so as not to lose the juice) and do not let th...
-Rabbits
Roast Rabbit As soon as possible skin, clean and hang it over night. When ready to cook, wash and stuff as you would poultry. Then sew it up. Lay it in a dripping-pan; pour a cupful of hot water into...
-Meats
Remarks Beef is best in winter and early spring, though it is good all the year round. Mutton is best in spring, veal and lamb in summer, and pork in early winter. In choosing meat, never buy that i...
-Beef
Roast Beef The best pieces for roasting are the tenderloin (an expensive piece), the sirloin, and rib-pieces. The latter are usually chosen for a small family, and are very good, the sixth, seventh a...
-Beef. Continued
Stuffed Beefsteak 2 pounds rump steak. 1 cupful Stuffing. 1 or 2 slices salt pork. 1 cupful Stock or water. 1/4 cupful catsup. Have the steak cut evenly. Make a stuffing as for turkey, adding ...
-Veal
Roast Veal The best pieces to roast are the loin and fillet. The breast also is roasted. That and the fillet should be prepared like Beef a la Mode, with incisions filled with stuffing, made with c...
-Mutton
Roast Mutton Or Lamb The parts to roast are the saddle and shoulder; and the leg, if not very large. Allow twelve or fifteen minutes to the pound, and as mutton is preferred well done by most persons...
-Pork
Roast Pork The pieces to roast are the shoulder, spare-rib, leg, loin and chine. Pork requires a moderate oven and very thorough cooking. Allow full twenty minutes to a pound, and let it heat through...
-Ham
Boiled Ham Soak in cold water over night, changing the water once or twice. Then wash, rubbing very hard. Put into a large pot of cold water. Cover and simmer slowly, taking care to keep the meat cov...
-Veal Stew
2 pounds veal steak. 1 small potato sliced. 2hard-boiled eggs (may bd omitted). 1 cupful milk. Salt and pepper to taste. 2table spoonfuls of flour. Cut the veal into lumps. Put it into a skillet...
-Pilau
(A Turkish Dish.) 3 pounds lamb, veal, or chicken. 2 quarts cold water. l 1/2 cupfuls raw rice (washed). Pepper and salt. Buy pieces from the neck, shank, rib, or any odd cheap pieces. Each piece s...
-Stews
Calcutta Curry 2chickens (boiled and jointed). 3or 4 slices salt pork. Butter size of an egg. 3 onions (sliced fine). 1 tablespoonful curry powder. A dredging of flour. Salt. Boiling water (abou...
-Meat Pies
Meat Pie Any kind of meat will do, either that which has been already cooked, or raw meat, the cheaper cuts of veal or beef being preferred. Cut them into slices of convenient size for helping, and i...
-Turnips
Old Turnips. Wash, peel, and lay in cold water for an hour. Then put into cold salted water over the fird two and a half hours before dinner. When tender, drain well, and mash with a potato-masher, ad...
-Squash
Winter Squash Cut it up, throw away the inside, and pare the pieces. The best way to cook it is in a steamer, or colander, set over a kettle of boiling water, so as not to touch the water. Cover tigh...
-Cabbage
Fried Cabbage Melt a lump of butter in a frying-pan. When very hot, stir in some cold, boiled cabbage, well seasoned with butter, pepper and salt, and moistened with a little cream or milk. Stir til...
-Cauliflower
Boiled Cauliflower Remove the outside leaves and soak for an hour in cold salted water. If very large, cut in half; otherwise cook it whole. Put into salted boiling water, and boil slowly, so that it...
-Stewed Carrots
Wash, scrape, and lay in cold water for one hour. Then cut around in thick slices. Put into boiling water, salted, and boil slowly from one to one and one half hours. When half done, pour off the wate...
-Salsify Or Oyster Plant
Stewed Salsify Or Oyster Plant Wash, but do not scrape it, as that will cause it to turn black and to lose much of its flavor. Put it into boiling water salted. Boil slowly till tender, about three q...
-Stuffed Peppers
8 green peppers. 2 ounces butter. 2 tablespoonfuls olive oil. 2 chopped onions. 1 pint mushrooms. A little salt and white pepper. A dash of red pepper. A dash of nutmeg. Tomato Sauce. 3handfuls fr...
-Stewed Celery
Cut the white part of the celery into pieces one inch long. Drop into boiling water. Boil half an hour. Then pour off the water, and cover with milk. Boil until the celery is tender, perhaps half an h...
-Spinach
Boiled Spinach As spinach shrinks very much in cooking be sure to buy plenty. A peck is not too much for a family of seven. Wash well, and pick it over carefully, as it is liable to be gritty. Put it...
-Greens (Various Kinds)
The roots and tops of young beets, young cabbages, turnips, or mustard-tops, dandelions and lettuce make good greens. Prepare and boil like Boiled Spinach, taking care to use plenty of water, and s...
-Boiled Asparagus
Wash and cut the stalks of equal length, trimming off the woody ends. Tie them in a bunch, with a strip of muslin. Put into plenty of boiling water, salted. Boil very gently one hour, longer if old. H...
-Peas
Shell, but do not wash them. Soak for half an hour in just enough water to cover them. Put them on to boil in the same water, without adding any more. Cover and boil slowly (counting from the time the...
-Beans
French, String Or Snap Beans String carefully, breaking off each end. Cut each bean into two or three pieces. Then cook like peas, only at least half an hour longer. Another way is to boil a piece o...
-Corn
Boiled Corn Take off all the green leaves, except one layer, and pull off the dark part of silk; put into boiling salted water, and boil from twenty minutes to an hour, according to the age. Do not ...
-Okra
Cut the pods into round, thick slices. Put them into boiling salted water, only enough to cover them. Simmer slowly three quarters of an hour. When tender add salt, pepper, and a lump of butter. Serve...
-Vegetables
Sweet Potatoes See Sweet Potatoes Baked If any one chooses to boil sweet potatoes, she must experiment for herself, as I never yet tasted a boiled sweet potato that was a success. They should alwa...
-Boiled Rice
Wash a cupful of rice. Rub it hard between the hands and use several waters, till there is no milkiness. Put the rice into a double boiler, pour over it one quart of boiling water and add two teaspoon...
-Pies
Remarks Pies should be light, flaky and tender, and the bottom crust, in particular, should be well-baked. A pie made thus is a very different thing from the leathery sodden things that go by the nam...
-Pie Crust
Rich Pie Crust (For One Pie.) 1 heaping cupful flour. A small pinch salt. 2 even tablespoonfuls lard. 1/4 cupful very cold water. 2 even tablespoonfuls butter. Stir the salt into the flour. Put in...
-Mince Meat Pie
Mince Meat Pie No. 1 2 pounds beef (from the round). 1 pound suet (chopped). 4 pounds apples (chopped). 2 pounds raisins (chopped). 1 pound raisins, stoned, but whole. 1 pound currants, well wa...
-Mince Pies
For mince-meat, see the following receipts. They are baked with both an under and an upper crust. A pretty way to make one for Christmas is with letters for the word Christmas cut out of the paste a...
-Dessert Pies
Confederate Pies 1 cupful fine, white cornmeal mush, hot. 1 cupful sugar. 1 cupful cream, 4 eggs, well beaten. 3 tablespoonfuls butter, melted. 1 glass wine. A little cinnamon. Beat all well...
-Dessert Pies. Part 2
Apple Custard Pie 1 cupful strained, stewed apple. 1 cupful sugar. 1 egg, well-beaten. A little grated nutmeg. 1 cupful cream. Mix all together in order. Pour into a bottom crust and bake in a mode...
-Dessert Pies. Part 3
Lemon Pie 1 table spoonful starch (not corn starch). 1 cupful boiling water. 1 cupful sugar. Butter size of a nutmeg. 1lemon. 2eggs. Wet the starch smooth with cold water, and stir it into the cu...
-Dessert Pies. Part 4
Berry Pies (Any Kind) Pick over the berries, and pile them high in a bottom crust, with layers of sugar between, and a sprinkling of flour. Cover with a top crust, taking care to close the edges wel...
-Rhubarb Pie
Rhubarb Pie No. 1 Cut rhubarb stalks into half-inch pieces. Pile high on a bottom crust, with thick layers of brown sugar. Add a few seedless raisins, if you like. Cover with crust. Cut a slit in the...
-Puddings
Apple Tapioca Pudding (Or Other Fruit) 1/2 cupful tapioca. 1 quart water. 1/2 saltspoonful salt. 2 tablespoonfuls sugar. 6 or 8 juicy apples. Nutmeg and cinnamon. Soak the tapioca in the water for ...
-Puddings. Part 2
Rice Pudding 1/2 cupful rice, well washed. 1 saltspoonful salt. 1/3 cupful raisins. 1 quart milk. 3 eggs, yolks and whites separate. 1 cupful sugar. 1 teaspoonful vanilla. Boil together in a double...
-Puddings. Part 3
Pan Dowdy (A New England Dish) This is best made in the fall, of the early sour apples, the skin of which is thin and contains much richness. Quarter and core the apples. Fill a large buttered puddin...
-Puddings. Part 4
Sweet Potato Pudding 1 pound butter. 1 pound sugar. 2 pounds sweet potato (cooked). 5 eggs (beaten light). 1 wineglass wine. 1table spoonful brandy. 2teaspoonfuls cinnamon. 1 cupful cream. Butt...
-Puddings. Part 5
Pudding Of Cold Corn Bread Cold corn bread, left from breakfast, may be used as follows: 1 quart milk. A pinch salt. 8 tablespoonfuls corn bread. 6 tablespoonfuls molasses. 2/3 teaspoonful ginger. ...
-Puddings With Flour
Cream Batter Pudding 1 cupful sour cream. 1 cupful flour. 1 cupful sweet milk. 2/3 teaspoonful soda dissolved. 3 eggs, yolks and wlrites separate. A pinch of salt. Mix in order, beating the eggs...
-Puddings With Flour. Continued
Washington Pie Mix Washington Cake, or Jelly Cake Without Eggs, and bake in pie-plates, in a rather hot oven, about fifteen minutes. When done, lay one loaf bottom side up on a warm plate ; sprea...
-Boiled Puddings
How To Boil Puddings When you are going to prepare a pudding, have a kettle full of boiling water ready to put it in at once; also a tea-kettle of* boiling water to replenish with. Wring the pudding-...
-Boiled Puddings. Continued
English Plum Pudding l 1/2 pounds fine bread-crumbs. 1/2 pound minced suet. 1/2 pound raisins, stoned and chopped. 1 pound currants, washed anddried. 1/2 pound brown sugar. 1 teaspoonful salt...
-Dumplings
Apple Dumpling Make Potato Crust, roll it out one third of an inch thick in the middle, but roll the edges thin, to avoid thick folds of paste. Wring a thick square cloth in hot water; sprinkle it...
-Pudding Sauces
Hard Sauce 1 cupful sugar. 1/2 cupful butter. Nutmeg. Rub the butter and sugar till creamy. Put into a glass dish, smooth the top with a knife, grate over it a little nutmeg, and set on ice. This ...
-Pudding Sauces. Continued
Custard Sauce 1 pint milk. 1/2 cupful sugar. 2 eggs. 1/2 teaspoonful vanilla. Put the milk to boil in a pail set within one of boiling water. Beat eggs, sugar, and vanilla together. When the milk ...
-Delicacies For Dessert
Remarks In making custard or anything for which boiled milk is necessary, use a double-boiler, so as not to scorch the milk. If you have none, set the sauce-pan within a pan of boiling water. Anythin...
-Flavorings For Custards, Etc
Zest. Rub lumps of white sugar over the peel of a lemon, and melt them in custard. This is a most delicate way of getting the flavor of lemon-peel. Burnt Sugar Flavoring. Put one tablespoonful brown ...
-Creams
Junket 1 quart new milk. 2tablespoonfuls sugar. 1 teaspoonful vanilla or a few drops rose extract. 1 tablespoonful prepared rennet. Mix all together about one and one half hours before it is to be...
-Creams. Part 2
Bavarian Cream With Eggs 1/2 box Cox's gelatine. 1/2 cupful warm water. 1 quart cream. 4 tablespooufuls sugar. 4 eggs (yolks only). 1 teaspoonful vanilla. Soak the gelatine in the warm water for tw...
-Creams. Part 3
Orange Fool 2 large oranges, juice only. Sugar to sweeten. 2 or 3 eggs, well beaten. 2/3 pint cream. Mix all together, in a pitcher; set this into a pan of hot water, and stir it over a slow fire u...
-Blanc Mange
Ribbon Blanc Mange 1 box Cox's gelatine. 1 pint cold water. 3 cupfuls milk. 2 1/4 cupfuls sugar. 2 eggs, yolks only. 2 tablespoonfuls chocolatd grated. A little red syrup. Soak the gelatine in the...
-Blanc Mange. Part 2
Snow Balls (A Simple Dessert) Boil rice in salted boiling water till very tender. Wet small cups, and while the rice is still hot, pack it in the cups till half filled. Set in a cold place for about ...
-Blanc Mange. Part 3
German Blanc Mange 1 quart milk. 4 table spoonfuls sugar. 1/2 saltspoonful salt. 5 table spoonfuls cornstarch. 3 eggs (whites only). A few drops rose-extract. Make like Simple Cornstarch Blanc M...
-Imitation Hen's Nest
For several days before you make this, save the shells of the eggs used for cooking; pour the contents through a small hole at one end, thus keeping the shells as whole as possible. Rinse them out wit...
-Charlotte Russe
Charlotte Russe 1/2 oz. Cox's gelatine. 1/2 cupful hot milk. 1 pint cream. 2/3 cupful sugar (pulverized). 2 eggs (whites only). 4 tablespoonfuls wine (or a little vanilla). Soak and dissolve the...
-Custard
Soft Custard 1 pint milk. 2 1/2 tablespoonfuls sugar. 3 eggs (yolks only). To make it, see Boiled Custard. A very delicate and simple dessert. Boiled Custard 1 quart milk. 5 eggs (yolks only)....
-Floating Island
Make either of the two custards given above. Substitute flour for the cornstarch if you prefer, using a little less. When cool, and shortly before serving, beat the whites of the eggs, add pulverized ...
-Ice Cream, Etc
Frozen Custard Make Boiled or Cornstarch Custard, but use as much as one half pound of sugar. Freeze it as directed, on freezer. A Rich Ice Cream. 5 cupfuls cream. 1 1/2 cupfuls sugar. 1 1/2 tea...
-Fruit Ices
2quarts water. 3pounds sugar. 1 quart fruit juice. Brandy, if you like. Sweeten the water, strain any kind of fruit juice; add it and freeze. This requires a longer time to freeze than other ices. ...
-Candy
Cream Chocolates Grate part of a cake of Baker's chocolate, and melt it over the fire, without the addition of water. Mix together confectioner's or pulverized sugar and a little cream, till it is of...
-Candy. Continued
Fruit Candy. (No. 1) 2 pounds sugar. 2 lemons (juice only). Raisins and figs (chopped). Boil the sugar with the lemon-juice (slowly and without stirring) till it ropes when poured from the spoon. ...
-Desserts Prepared Quickly
Whipped Cream in glasses with Cake. Baked Apples. Baked Apples with Whipped Cream, or an uncooked Meringue poured over the tops. Batter Pudding. Vanities. German Puffs. Rice Puffs. Boiled Rice, with ...
-French Candies (Without Cooking)
1 egg (white only). Cold water. 1 pound confectioner's sugar (more or less). Flavoring. Break the white of the egg into a cup, and measure about the same bulk of water. Then put the egg into a lar...
-Burnt Almonds
1 pound almonds. 3/4 pound sugar. 1 cupful water. A few drops vanilla or rose. Put the sugar and water on to boil. While they are heating shell the almonds, but do not pull off the skins. Warm them ...
-Bread
Remarks Use none but good yeast and flour for making bread. The new brands of flour vary very much; and some, though equally good, require more wetting than others. Notice the first baking; if too s...
-Bread. Part 2
How To Bake Bread Arrange the oven as for roasting; meat. If too hot at first, the loaves will burn on the outside and be doughyinside. At the end of fifteen minutes the bread should have risen up an...
-Bread. Part 3
Bread (With Compressed Yeast) 3 1/2 quarts flour. l 1/2 tablespoonfuls salt. 1 tablespoonful sugar. 1 tablespoonful lard or butter (softened). l 1/2 quarts warm water. 1/2 cake compressed yeast. Dis...
-Bread. Part 4
Superior Graham Bread 1 quart Graham flour (not sifted). 1 pint white flour. 3 teaspoonfuls salt. 2 tablespoonfuls brown sugar. 3/4 tablespoonful butter or lard (softened). 1/2 cupful molasses. ...
-Remarks On Rolls, Etc
If you use milk for rolls which are set with yeast, it must be sweet (new if possible). As the long rising is liable to sour the milk, it is a good plan always to scald it, allowing it afterwards to c...
-Remarks On Rolls, Etc. Part 2
Concord Tea Rolls 1 pint new milk. 1 large table spoonful butter. 2 quarts flour. 2 teaspoonfuls salt. 1 tablespoonful sugar. 1 cupful yeast, shaken. Heat slightly the first two ingredients in the ...
-Remarks On Rolls, Etc. Part 3
Graham Biscuit 1 cupful Graham flour. 1 cupful white flour. 1 1/2 teaspoonfuls salt. 1/2 cupful brown sugar. 1 tablespoonful melted butter. 1 cupful sweet milk. 1/2 cupful yeast. Mix in this order,...
-Remarks On Rolls, Etc. Part 4
Baking-Powder Biscuit 1 quart flour. 1 teaspoonful salt. 3 teaspoonfuls baking powder. 2 tablespoonfuls shortening. 2 cupfuls milk. Measure very accurately. Have the mixing-bowl and ingredie...
-Uses For Pieces Of Bread And Crumbs
Remarks I will preface these remarks by saying that by a little judicious management there is no need to have an accumulation of broken bread. In the first place, fresh bread should not be baked till...
-Toast
Remarks Dry Toast is the foundation for every other kind, therefore read over the directions for that before trying any other. Many persons think that nothing is easier than to make a good slice of t...
-Yeast
Remarks No directions are here given for making new yeast without old yeast as an ingredient. Therefore in making it be sure that you have good lively yeast to raise it with. Borrow from a reliable n...
-Remarks On Cakes
Before you begin to mix cake, grease the tins, measure out all the necessary ingredients, and see that you have a good fire; for cake should not be allowed to stand either during the process of mixing...
-Cake Frostings
Old-Fashioned Frosting To the white of each egg allow one scant cupful of pulverized sugar. Have the eggs as cold as possible, in a large platter. Do not beat them alone, but begin by beating half th...
-Lemon Cake Filling
Lemon Cake Filling (No. 1) 3 eggs. 2 cupfuls sugar. 2 lemons. Butter size of an egg. Beat eggs and sugar together, add grated peel and juice of the lemons. Put in the butter and stir it over a sl...
-Filling For Cake
Orange Filling 1 orange. 2 tablespoonfuls. flour. 1 cupful sugar. 1 cupful boiling water. 1 egg (beaten light). Grate half the rind of the orange. Squeeze the juice. Rub the flour smooth in this. ...
-Jelly-Cake
Plain Jelly-Cake Mix like Feather Cake. Fill jelly-cake tins only half-full and bake in a very hot oven - about ten minutes - taking care not to let the edges harden. When cold, spread each layer ...
-Sponge Cake
Quick Sponge Cake 4 eggs (yolks and whites sep-arate). 1 cupful pulverized sugar. 1 cupful flour. A pinch of salt. Beat the yolks of the eggs with the sugar; add the whites, and beat in the flour a...
-Almond Cake
No. 1. 1 cupful butter. 1 1/2 cupfuls sugar. 3 eggs (beaten light). 1/2 cupful milk. 3 cupfuls flour (about). 2 teaspoonfuls baking powder. 1/4 teaspoonful almond extract. 1 pound almonds. Mi...
-Chocolate Cake
No. 1 1 cupful butter. 2 cupfuls sugar. 5 eggs (leaving out whites of three). 1 cupful milk. 1/2 teaspoonful soda, dissolved. 1 teaspoonful cream of tartar. 3 1/2cupfuls flour. Mix in order, f...
-Orange Cake
No 1. Make Old-Fashioned Sponge Cake, substituting oranges for the lemons. Bake in jelly-cake tins about ten minutes in a very hot oven; and when cool spread each layer with Orange Frosting. Pi...
-Cakes
White Mountain Cake 1 cupful butter. 2 cupfuls sugar. 2 eggs (beaten light). 1 cupful milk. 1 teaspoonful soda dissolved. 2 teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar. 3 1/2cupfuls flour. Mix in this ord...
-Cakes. Part 2
Cup Cake 3 cupfuls sugar. 1 1/2 cupfuls butter. 3 eggs, beaten light. 1 1/2 cupfuls milk. 1 teaspoonful soda. 2 teaspoonfuls cream of tartar. 6 cupfuls flour. A little nutmeg. 1 wineglassful w...
-Cakes. Part 3
Pound Cake 1 pound butter. 1 pound sugar. 6 eggs, beaten light. 1 pound flour. 1 wineglassful brandy or wine. A little rose water. Cream the butter and sugar very thoroughly. Beat the yolks and w...
-Cakes. Part 4
Silver Cake 2 cupfuls white sugar. 1/2 cupful butter. 8 eggs (whites only). 2 1/2 cupfuls flour. 1 teaspoonful cream of tartar, 3/4 cupful milk. 1/2 teaspoonful soda. A little rose water. Cream ...
-Gingerbread
Rye Beach Gingerbread 1 cupful molasses. 1 cupful brown sugar. 1/2 cupful lard and butter, mixed. 2 1/2 tablespoonfuls ginger. 34 or 4 cupfuls flour. 1 cupful sour milk. 3 eggs (even 1 will d...
-Cookies And Small Cakes
Remarks In mixing cookies, etc., care should be taken not to put in too much flour, as this makes them hard. The only remedy for it afterwards is to work into the dough a little melted butter or milk...
-Cookies And Small Cakes. Part 2
Nutmeg Cookies 1 heaping cupful butter. 2 cupfuls white sugar. 2 eggs (beaten light). 1/2 a nutmeg, grated. 1 cupful milk. 1 teaspoonful soda (dissolved). 4 cupfuls flour. 2 teaspoonfuls cream ta...
-Cookies And Small Cakes. Part 3
Jumbles 1 heaping cupful butter. 2 cupfuls white sugar. 3 eggs (beaten light). 1/2 cupful milk. 1/2 teaspoonful soda. Flavoring to your fancy. Flour as little as will roll them out. Rub the butte...
-Tea
Fill the teapot with hot water, then pour it out. After thus heating the teapot, throw into it one even teaspoonful of tea allowed for each person, and one for the teapot. Cover with boiling water, an...
-Suggestions For Tea
Toast of all kinds. Savory Toast. Anchovy Toast. Ramakin Toast. Cracker and Milk Toast. Bread and Milk, (boiled). Bread boiled in Molasses. Tea Cakes, Muffins, etc. Fritters of all kinds. Waffles. Wel...
-Coffee
Coffee (No. 1) Every one has her own pet way of making coffee. Here are two rules, both good, though differing widely. Heat the coffee-pot. Throw into it one tablespoonful of coffee allowed to each ...
-Chocolate
Allow one dessert-spoonful of grated chocolate to each cup. Allow a half cupful each of milk and water to each person (or use milk alone). Put the milk and water on to boil in a double boiler. When bo...
-Beverages
Blackberry Wine Mash well the berries, which should not be over-ripe. Strain the juice and pulp through a thin cloth, squeezing the pulp thoroughly. Set the juice away to settle until next day. Then ...
-Beer
Spruce Beer Checkerberry leaves (a large handful). Black cherry-tree bark (very little). Winter-green (a little). Sassafras root. Horse-radish (very little). Dandelion root (very little). Spruce, th...
-Doughnuts
1 pint sugar. 2 eggs. 1 pint boiling water. 1/2 cupful melted butter and lard mixed. 1/2 a nutmeg grated. 1 quart flour. 3 teaspoonfuls baking-powder. Beat the sugar and eggs together. Add the wa...
-Stewed And Baked Fruits
Apple Sauce Peel and core tart, juicy apples, and cut them into even slices. Stew with water enough to barely cover them, crushing them often with a wooden spoon. When half done, add sugar. Then boil...
-Stewed And Baked Fruits. Continued
Delicate Baked Apples Pare and core the apples. Lay them in an earthen dish, with a very little water in the bottom. Fill the centre of each apple with sugar and a lump of butter, or a slice of lemon...
-Preserves
Remarks A porcelain-lined kettle is the best for preserving. Stir preserves with a wooden spoon. Use white sugar unless brown is specified. The fruit should be fresh. That which is not too ripe is be...
-Preserves. Part 2
Tutti-Frutti Preserve (Without Boiling) Begin to make this preserve with the first fruit that comes, and put in some of every kind in its season, until fall, being sure to use one pound of black cher...
-Preserves. Part 3
Transparent Preserves (Apple and Lemon.) Use fair, sweet, firm apples. Pare them, and cut them across the core in slices a quarter of an inch thick. Remove seeds, but not the core. Weigh them. Boil ...
-Preserves. Part 4
Preserved Apples Peel, quarter, and core firm, sour apples (Newtown pippins are best). To each pound of fruit thus prepared allow one pound of sugar (brown will do). Put the latter on the fire with o...
-Preserves. Part 5
Preserved Currants Weigh equal quantities of sugar and fruit stripped from the stalks. Boil the fruit, allowing half a cupful of water to each pound of fruit, for ten minutes. Stir, and crush with a ...
-Marmalade
Orange Marmalade Peel the fruit. Put the peels on to boil. Let them boil a long time, changing the water several times. Cut the oranges across the grain, so as to remove the seeds. Take off all the t...
-Jam
Jam (Any Kind Of Fruit) Pare, core, and quarter the fruit. (Use sour or sweet apples, pears, quinces, peaches, etc., or berries of any kind.) Boil (gently at first) in enough water to cover them, unt...
-Brandy Peaches
Brandy Peaches (No. 1) Weigh the peaches, and weigh an equal number of pounds of sugar. Pour boiling water over the peaches, a few at a time, then the skins can be easily removed without waste, or in...
-Jellies
How To Make Jelly All fruit can be made into jelly by the same rule, though some kinds require less water than others in boiling, on account of their juciness, and less sugar is required for quinces ...
-Jellies. Part 2
Wine Jelly 1/2 box Cox's gelatine. 1 cupful cold water. 1 cupful boiling water. 1 pint Sicily Madeira wine. 1 large lemon, sliced. l 1/2 cupfuls sugar. 3 inches stick cinnamon, broken fine. Soak ...
-Jellies. Part 3
Orange Baskets, With Jelly 1/2 box gelatine. 1/2 cupful cold water. 1 cupful boiling water. 1 pint orange-juice. 1 large lemon. 1 cupful sugar. Whipped Cream (may be omitted). Before you cut ...
-Catsups
Walnut Catsup Gather walnuts while tender enough to run a needle through them. Pound in a marble mortar. Put them in a preserving-kettle. Cover them with water and let them simmer for two hours. Str...
-Pickles
Pickled Blackberries 3 quarts blackberries. 1 quart vinegar. 1 quart brown sugar. Boil all together for ten minutes and seal hot. Nasturtium Seed (Without Boiling) Gather the seed, while green,...
-Pickles. Part 2
Pickled Cabbage 1 large firm head of cabbage. 1/2 dozen onions. Salt. 1 pint vinegar. 1 cupful sugar. 1 teaspoonful ground mustard. 1 teaspoonful black pepper. 1 teaspoonful cinnamon. 1 teaspoo...
-Pickles. Part 3
Mustard Pickle 1 quart onions. 1 quart tomatoes. 1 quart cucumbers. 1 quart cauliflower. 2 quarts vinegar. 2/3 cupful sugar. 1/3 cupful flour. 1/4 pound ground mustard. 1/3 teaspoonful cayenne pepp...
-For The Sick
Remarks Never consult the sick about what they shall eat, but notice for yourself what they do and do not like. If you find something that has suited their taste, do not overwhelm them with too const...
-For The Sick. Part 2
Beef In Various Ways 1 pound lean beef. 2 wineglasses sherry. 1 tablespoonful sugar. Lemon-juice to taste. 1 heaping tablespoonful gelatine. Cut up the beef; put it in a bottle; cork tightly; plun...
-For The Sick. Part 3
Graham Gruel 1/2 cupful Graham flour. 1/2 cupful cold water. 1 quart boiling water. 2 teaspoonfuls salt. Stir the flour smooth in the cold water. Pour it into the salted boiling water, over the fir...
-For The Sick. Part 4
Compound Barley Water 2 pints barley water. 2 ounces figs (sliced). 5 drachms licorice root (sliced). 2 1/2 ounces raisins (seeded). 1 pint soft water. For barley water (see above). Boil all tog...
-For The Sick. Part 5
Whey 1 quart milk. 1 tablespoonful prepared rennet. Mix and leave to stand half an hour in a warm place. Then cut it in all directions with a knife; half an hour later, pour off the whey. Leave the...
-For The Sick. Part 6
Coffee With Egg If a person likes coffee, the yolk of an egg may be stirred into a cupful of very strong coffee, which is then to be diluted with boiling milk to the proper strength for drinking. The...
-For The Sick. Part 7
How To Make A Saucerful Of Ice Cream In Fifteen Minutes Mix a small quantity of any of the Ice Creams given. Put it into a covered pint can, and put the can in a halfgallon pail of pounded ice or s...
-Miscellaneous
How To Preserve Eggs For Winter Use (Use an old jar, for a nice one will be stained by the lime.) To three gallons of water put one pint of salt and one pound of quick-lime. Stir all together, and l...
-Miscellaneous. Continued
Pickle To Cure Hams 8 pounds ground alum salt. 1 quart molasses. 2ounces salt petre. 2 1/2 ounces of potash or saler atus. 8 gallons water. Allow the above to every one hundred pounds of meat. B...
-Afterthoughts
Two or three remarks are here made, which were overlooked in their proper connection. Under Tea, attention should have been called to the fact that almost every receipt given under Breakfast and Lunc...







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