Nourishing Properties Of Various Foods

In the hope of arousing and cultivating intelligent interest in respect to the nutritive value of the most common articles of food, I present the following table, from "Science in the Kitchen," published at Battle Creek, the world-famed sanitarium town:

GRAINS.

PER CENT.

Wheat, Poland..................

86.8

Wheat, Michigan, White.........

85.5

Wheat, Michigan, Diehl.........

85.5

Wheat, Michigan, Japanese.......

84.7

Rye, Winter..................

89.8

Rye, German...........

92.

Barley.........................

82.2

Barley, So. Russian..............

86.

Oats............................

80.1

Corn, Flint.................

84.9

Corn, Dent...............

84.4

Corn, Sweet.....................

83.7

Rice...................

86.9

Millet..........................

85.7

Buckwheat.........................

85.6

Irish Moss...................................

81.1

FLOUR.

Graham.......................

85.1

Wheat..........................

88.2

Rye............................

84.7

Barley...............

84.7

Oat.............................

91.4

Corn........................

84.3

Buckwheat.......................

85.8

Bean...............

88.

Pea.............................

87.3

Arrowroot....................................

82.

BREAD.

PER CENT.

Barley...................

83.3

WholeWheat....................

81.7

White..........................

54.9

Rye...........................

57.2

Swedish Speise Brod.................

87.

Zwieback, White.................

85.2

Rye............................

83.7

Macroni....................

86.9

Manna....................................

74.6

FRESH FRUITS.

Apple................

13.7

Apricot...............

13.5

Blackberry.................

6.6

Banana.........................

26.7

Cherry......................

14.8

Cranberry..............

4.1

Currant................

10.7

Grape...............

18.2

Gooseberry..................

10.8

Pear................

12.4

Prune.....................

13.4

Plum...........................

10.8

Peach...............

13.9

Raspberry....................

6.9

Strawberry...............................

10.1

Whortleberry....................

9.3

DRIED FRUITS.

PER CENT.

Prune...........................

69.2

Pear .....................

63.7

Apple...........................

67.

Cherry....................

49.4

Raisin.....................

66.3

Fig..................

56.7

Date................................

67.

NUTS.

Chestnut...................

89.3

Walnut...................

88.2

Hazelnut...................

89.7

Sweet Almonds.........................

87.3

Peanut....................

79.6

Cocoanut.......................

50.5

VEGETABLES.

Sugar Beet.........................

16.8

Parsnip...................

10.

Sweet Potato.......................

27.2

Cucumber................

4.

Asparagus.................

5.3

Cauliflower......................

8.2

Melon.............

8.2

Squash......................

8.5

Onion

13.3

Pumpkin...................

8.5

Tomato.....................

6.8

Peas, Green, Garden.....................

19.7

Peas, Small......................

83.3

Peas, African................

90.2

Peas, Green........................

84.1

Beans, Field................

78.5

Peas, French or Kidney...................

85.2

Peas, White................

82.2

Peas, Lima.........................

87.

String, Beans.................

10.1

Lentils................

83.8

Lentils, German...............

74.7

MILK AND BUTTER.

PER CENT.

Cow's Milk....................

14.

Cream..................

34.

Swedish Butter.................

86.2

French Butter...............

87.4

Cheese, Stilton..................

68.

Skimmed Milk....................

10.4

SACCHARINE.

Syrup................

75.4

Honey................

79.4

Buttermilk...................

9.2

Milk of Cow-tree................

40.2

VEGETABLES.

Carrot.......................

11.7

Winter Cabbage...................

18.1

Red Cabbage...............

8.7

White Cabbage................

8.2

Spinach.................

10.5

Celery...................

14.5

Head Lettuce............

4.9

Potato...................

24.4

White Turnip.............

5.4

Beet .....................

11.5

MEATS.

Beef, Lean..............

28.

Mutton.......................

28.

Veal .................

37.

Pork ................

61.

Poultry.................

26.

White Fish....................

22.

Salmon....................

23.

Entire Egg.................

26.

White of Egg.................

22.

Yolk of Egg.................

48.

Vegetarianism

"Let us be thankful, not only that we are alive, but that everything else is alive," said Dr. Kellogg, in announcing that there would be no turkey, no animal food of any kind, at a recent Thanksgiving dinner of the Battle Creek sanitarium.

People who have never thought upon this subject doubtless think that such a feast would not be a Thanksgiving feast, and especially so as every form of animal food was also excluded; but there are many thousands of very intelligent persons who did the same thing. Yes, there are many strict vegetarians in our broad land to-day. Doubtless a large number have drawn their inspiration from the above institution. In order to show what a grand dinner can be made of vegetable foods, and to furnish suggestions for those who may desire to adopt, at least in a small measure, the vegetarian diet, I give the menu of the above dinner:

Menu

Vegetable Oyster Soup Tomato Bisque Toasted Wafers

Nut Roast Dressing Nuttolene - Mint Sauce Protose Cutlets Cranberry Sauce

Escalloped Potatoes Baked Sweet Potatoes

Kornlet

Boiled Onions Asparagus

Hubbard Squash

Potato Salad Lettuce Celery

Graham Bread White Bread

Swieback Sticks Granose Biscuit

Cocoanut Crisps Walnut Buns

Caramel Cereal Grape Nectar Fruit Cocoa Malted Nuts Kumyss

Peaches Plums

Strawberries Cherries

Lemon Pie Gold Cake

Roasted Almonds Pecans

Malaga Grapes Apples Oranges

Bananas Bromose

If any one will examine a half-dozen typical, well-ordered vegetarian menus, he will agree with us, after examining the same, that it is possible to prepare a good menu without the use of meats. To illustrate this fact, and to assist those who may be interested in the subject, I give place to a few every-day breakfasts and dinners which have been furnished me by the Battle Creek sanitarium:

Breakfast - Thanksgiving Morning

Fresh Fruit

Malaga Grapes Apples

Cereals

Cal. Breakfast Food Rolled Oats

Dextrinized Grains

Granola Zwieback Granut Granose Flakes Crystal Wheat Toasted Granose Biscuits Granola Porridge - Peaches

Entries

Sliced Protose or Nuttolene - Jelly

Broiled Protose Cottage Cheese

Poached Eggs

Vegetables

Baked Potatoes - Cream Sauce Stewed Tomatoes Protose Hash

Toasts

Toasted Whole-wheat Wafers Strawberry Tomato Snowflake Cream unfermented breads Sticks Passover Bread

Oatmeal Crackers White Crackers

Graham Crackers Breakfast Rolls Currant Puffs Cocoanut Crisps fermented breads White Bread Fine Graham Bread Coarse Graham Bread

Cooked Fruits

Baked Apples Pears

Plums Prunes

Liquid Foods For Invalids

Sterilized Dairy Milk Dairy Milk

Caramel-Cereal Dairy Cream Fruit Coco

Gluten Gruel Almond Cream

Another table showing that the very best animal food is only equal to the vegetable in nutritive value:

100 Parts.

Water.

Albumen or

Fibrin.

Gelatin.

Nutritive

Matter.

Beef............................

74

20

6

26

Veal............................

75

19

6

25

Mutton........................

71

22

7

29

Pork...........................

76

19

5

24

Chicken..........

73

20

7

27

Cod.............................

73

14

7

21

Hassock................

82

13

5

18

Sole......................

79

15

6

21

Fresh Fruits. How To Serve Them

FRESH fruits may safely be said to be nature's panacea for many of the ills under which humanity labors. Every fruit that grows contains properties especially needed by our race. At one time fruit upon the table was deemed a luxury designed solely for the wealthy or people of moderate circumstances on special occasions. To-day fruit is a necessity and from no well-set table is it absent. Each variety of fruit has its own health-giving properties - all conducive to happiness and long life. In them is stored up elements that assist digestion, refresh the brain, invigorate the body, and why should we go without - when fresh fruit of some sort can be obtained so cheaply? Physicians now heartily recommend a fruit diet to their patients, and were it to constitute half of the daily diet, intemperance and many other evils would be much lessened. We can personally vouch for a case of a young man who had become addicted to the use of intoxicants. A friend advised him to try the use of oranges before breakfast. He ridiculed but followed his advice, with the result that he became a convert to the fruit diet, and when a craving for alcoholic stimulants arose, he resorted to the immediate use of some sort of fruit, and no longer cared for what had been his bane. As he expressed it, fruit "became meat and drink" to him.

Fresh Fruits How To Serve Them IdealCookbook 74

There is no better tonic in the world than the juice of one-half of a lemon squeezed into a cupful of hot or cold water, drank without sugar, on rising in the morning. Headaches, languor, biliousness all disappear. We not only have our native fruits to draw from, but every country on earth contributes its choicest fruits, and when their value is more generally understood, the good effect upon the manners and morals of the world will be productive of grander lives, clearer brains and fewer ailments than now.

Fresh Fruits

into a cup, which keep in boiling water. Take the pieces of orange on the point of a large needle or skewer and dip them in the syrup. Place them on a dish that has been buttered lightly. Care must be taken not to stir the syrup as that spoils it. Mary B. Burns.

Fruit Glace

Prepare syrup as above and take any prepared fruits desired (grapes, pineapple, cherries, etc.) on point of a darning needle; dip them in the syrup; when cold they are ready for use.

Note. - Apples, it is said, are now considered to contain far more brain food than any other fruit or vegetable, and to be much more nutritious than potatoes, which enter so largely into the component parts of every meal. M. B. B.

Mixed Fruits

The beauty of any fruit is increased when it is tastefully dished. A beautiful method of showing off fruit is to procure a large gilt basket, and fill with apples, pears, peaches and grapes, and fill in the crevices with ferns and geraniums or any green sprays that suggest themselves. The dish so ornamented should never be too full, and always garnished in some way, either with leaves or flowers. When these are not at hand, embroidered or lace paper can be bought for the purpose. All fruit designed for the table should be carefully examined and wiped with a napkin before arranging it on the dish. Mrs. R. Beals.