Orange Marmalades

Orange Marmalade

Cut two dozen oranges in halves, crosswise. With a glass lemon-squeezer extract the juice. Dig out the pulp and seeds, throwing them away. Soak the peelings over night in salt and water. In the morning rinse and boil peelings in clear water until tender, then chop and add juice. Weigh and add equal quantity of sugar. Let boil thirty minutes. Put in jelly tumblers and cover as you do jelly. Hilda.

Orange Marmalade - No. 2

This delicious preserve, which requires the greatest care in preparation, is made chiefly of sweet oranges, when they are plentiful and in the best condition. Pare the outer rind from four oranges for every dozen pulped, and cut the rind up into small chips; scoop out the pulp, free from seeds, and the white inner skin, weigh the pulp and rind together before you put them into the preserving pan and have ready heated equal weight of loaf sugar; let the pulp and peel boil one-half hour, or till the chips are tender, then add the sugar and let it boil fifteen minutes longer; then fill the marmalade pots. Mrs. D. Day.

Spiced Fruits

Spiced Plums

Four pounds of plums, two pounds of sugar, one tablespoonful each of cloves, cinnamon, mace and allspice; stone the plums, then put all ingredients into a preserving kettle; cover with vinegar; boil until tender.

Mrs. Leone Hall.

Spiced Peaches

To nine pounds of peaches add five pounds of sugar and a pint of vinegar. Stick one clove into each peach, prick with a fork and stew until tender. Lay in a jar and pour over them the boiling syrup. Let them stand twenty-four hours, pour off the syrup, scald and pour again over the fruit. Seal in cans. Amy Curtis.

Spiced Tomatoes

Take sound, ripe tomatoes; peel them; cut them through the center across the cells; remove the seeds with a sharp-pointed knife into one dish and put the fleshy halves into a colander cells down, to drain. For twelve pounds of prepared fruit, put into a porcelain kettle one quart of best cider vinegar, three pounds of brown sugar, one ounce each of whole cloves, whole allspice and broken cinnamon. Put in also the juice drained from the tomatoes and as much of the pulp as may be separated from the seeds through a fine sieve. Let them come to a boil; then add all, or all by parts, of the tomatoes - according to the size of the kettle - and let them boil just five minutes. Skim them out into a common stone crock, then boil the syrup down to a richness and turn it on the fruit in the crock. Let it cool, and set it away for use. It will be very good, but not so nice, without removing the seeds, which is the most troublesome part of the work. Mrs. M. Grant.

5piced Currants

Wash and pick five pounds of red currants, add two tablespoonfuls of allspice, three pounds of granulated sugar, one pint of cider vinegar and one tablespoonful of powdered cloves and one tablespoonful of cinnamon. Stew gently for three hours. R. Eaton.

Spiced Gooseberries

Four quarts of gooseberries, three pounds of brown sugar, one pint of cider vinegar, one teaspoonful each of ground cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg. Boil rather slowly until fruit is thoroughly cooked. Seal.

C. M. M.

Canned Fruits And Vegetables

THERE are many methods to pursue in canning fruit. The main point is to see that the fruit is sound and of a good flavor; that the cans are sweet and the rubbers neither dry nor brittle and finally that the tops are screwed down air-tight. A good way to test the latter is to turn the can after it is filled bottom-side up to cool. If no juice escapes, you can feel sure that it is air-tight.

A-1 Method Of Canning Fruit

I give herewith the best method I have in my long experience ever known in canning fruit. It is not a new method but the "tried and not found wanting," is the best guide to follow, whether in canning fruit or in doing anything else in life. Make a syrup of one-half pound of granulated sugar and one-half cupful of water for every pound of fruit (less sugar may be used, if desired). Put the sugar in a granite kettle, pour on the water and let it dissolve. When dissolved put on the stove and boil slowly ten minutes. Watch to see that it does not burn. (If it needs clarifying see method on first page of "Preserved Fruits.") Now, while the sugar is being syruped get the fruit ready. First wash thoroughly the cans, rubbers and tops, fill the cans with the fruit within three inches of the top and stand them in the boiler leaving off the tops, putting on the bottom of the boiler some straw, excelsior or old cloths, so as to avoid the cans tumbling against each other and spilling their contents; then fill the boiler with cold water up to within one-quarter of the top of the cans. Now set on the stove and let the fruit gradually heat, putting in from time to time the amount of syrup allowed for each pound of fruit. Let water in boiler come to a boil and then cook until the fruit is thoroughly heated. Fill to top with syrup. Screw on the top and take boiler off the stove and let stand till nearly cold, then turn cans bottom-side up to see that no juice escapes. If none, the cans are air-tight and the fruit will be perfect and as nice in five years as in six months. Try it.

Mrs. Mary Clark.

Method For Canning Various Fruits

The simplest and most satisfactory cans to use are of glass, with glass or granite top. Fill them by means of a funnel, just fitting into the neck of the jar, so that no fruit will be wasted. The fruit should be perfectly fresh and sound and carefully picked over so that no ill flavor will impair its quality. The following formula is simple:

Time Boiling Minutes.

Sugar to

Quart Ounces.

Cherries ....

5

6

Raspberries . . .

6

4

Blackberries . . .

6

6

Plums.....

10

½lb.

Whortleberries . .

5

¼lb.

Peaches, whole . .

15

4

Peaches, halved

8

4

Pears, whole . . .

30

4 to 6

Time Boiling Minutes.

Sugar to Quart Ounces.

Pears, halved. . .

20

8

Pineapple, sliced

15

6

Ripe currants . .

6

8

Grapes.....

10

8

Tomatoes ....

20

0

Gooseberries . . .

8

8

Quinces, sliced . .

15

10

In canning peaches, if two or three are put in without removing the pits, a bitter almond flavor will pervade the whole can.

Place a very wet hot cloth in the pan; set the jar on this, having rinsed them first in hot and then in cold water, place in it a silver spoon, put in the funnel and a cupful of syrup, then fill with fruit to the top. Remove the spoon and set the jar where no draft of air can strike it. Cover the fruit with syrup. In ten or fifteen minutes the contents of the jar will have cooled and settled some, and they will be ready to seal. Fill to the top with syrup or hot water; put on the top. When the jars are cold the top should be tightened again and set away in a cool, dark place. Some put a circular piece of paper on top of the jar before putting the cover on and think this prevents the mold that sometimes forms over the fruit. But if the cans stand till partially cool, and are then filled before being sealed, no mold will form. Julia Stevenson.