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Marion Harland's Complete Cook Book



A practical and exhaustive manual of cookery and housekeeping, Containing thousands of carefully proved recipes - prepared for the housewife, not for the chef - and many chapters on the care and management of the home - the final expression of her life's experience

TitleMarion Harland's Complete Cook Book
AuthorMarion Harland
PublisherThe Bobbs-Merrill Company
Year1903
Copyright1903, The Bobbs-Merrill Company
AmazonMarion Harland's Complete Cook Book
Marion Harland's Complete Cook BookMarion Harland

A practical and exhaustive manual of cookery and housekeeping, Containing thousands of carefully proved recipes - prepared for the housewife, not for the chef - and many chapters on the care and management of the home - the final expression of her life's experience

By Marion Harland Author of Common Sense in the Household, Etc.

Fully Illustrated

Indianapolis

The Bobbs-Merrill Company Publishers

Copyright 1903 The Bobbs-Merrill Company

June Press Of Braunworth & Co.

Bookbinders And Printers Brooklyn, N. Y.

-Dedicatory Preface
To My Fellow Housekeepers, North, East, South and West: Thirty-one years ago I wrote, dedicated to you, and sent to press, Common Sense in the Household. The daring step was taken in direct oppositi...
-Marketing
Mutton and beef may be called the Marketer's Perennials. They are in season all the year round. In buying mutton see that the fat is clear, very firm and white; the flesh close of grain, and ruddy. B...
-Care Of Household Stores
Apples, potatoes, turnips, carrots, beets, etc., if stored in bins or barrels, should be picked over every week. The defective should be thrown away, and if there be any sign of sweating, the good sho...
-Kitchen Utensils
It is not my purpose to discourage the housewife by a list of culinary furniture. The readers of Uncle Tom's Cabin may recall that Mr. St. Clair declared the evolution of irreproachable course dinn...
-Chemistry In The Kitchen
Here again I shall be brief and practical. Nobody would read this page were I to prate learnedly (apparently) of proteids, phosphates, dextrine, hyposulphites and computed chemical and dietetic values...
-Carving
The present mode of serving meats after the manner of the table d'hote - the carving done in the kitchen, and the results placed upon the platter to be served to the guests by butler or waiter - has i...
-Serving And Waiting
If a butler be engaged to do the family serving and waiting, he understands his business, or he should not apply for the place. The rules written out here are for the benefit of households where but o...
-Among The Linens
Everything commonly classed under this head should be carefully aired before it is put away. Even when this duty has been conscientiously performed, real linen, made of pure flax, has marvelous proper...
-The Children
Our forefathers and foremothers were dressed, in infancy, precisely like their fathers and mothers. As we see by the portraits treasured among our curios, they were abridged copies of the adults of a ...
-Diet And Digestion
The second depends upon the first. The two make up a whole which is Health. Food values is so emphatically a technical term that I would not employ it here if it did not express just what I mean, w...
-The Impromptu Larder
Some of her friends call it The Emergency Pantry. The owner objects to the term because it conveys an idea of bandages and styptics. Whereas, the cozy closet devoted to the comfort of possible guest...
-Familiar Talk Breakfast
Common sense would decide that we should begin the day with the glad alertness with which the sun smiles at us over horizon, or housetops. He rejoices as a strong man ready - that is, rubbed down, sup...
-Breakfast Fruits
The imported fashion of beginning breakfast with fresh fruit has become an American custom. The assuasive effect of the generous juices upon the coat of the stomach, usually clogged at early morning w...
-Breakfast Fruits. Continued
Melons Cantelopes and nutmeg melons are prime favorites as an introductory step to the weightier business of the morning meal. They deserve their popularity. Cut those of small and medium size in ha...
-Breakfast Cereals
Some dietetists, who are neither cranks nor simpletons, disbelieve in cereals of whatsoever sort as a first course at breakfast. They urge that to spread a hot poultice all over the lining of the stom...
-Breakfast Cereals. Continued
Hominy Soak all night; cover with boiling water, slightly salted, in the morning, and cook for an hour. A delicious preparation of hominy is effected by cooking it in plenty of salted water until ten...
-Breakfast Breads
Beginning with the most important and difficult form of bread-making, I offer three methods of preparing and baking the wholesome home-made loaf, fondly recollected by those whose early lives were spe...
-Breakfast Breads. Part 2
Bread With Plain Sponge (No. 2) Chop a tablespoonful of cottolene or other fat, or butter, into a quart of flour; wet with a quart of warm water; add a table-spoonful of sugar, and half a yeast-cake ...
-Breakfast Breads. Part 3
Graham Bread (No. 1) Set a sponge over night, as for white bread, and in the morning work into it a cup of salted whole wheat flour, three cups of graham flour and three tablespoonfuls of molasses. K...
-Breakfast Breads. Part 4
Steamed Boston Brown Bread Mix thoroughly a cup, each, of graham flour, wheat flour and corn-meal, and stir in a teaspoonful of salt. Warm together a cup of milk, in which is dissolved a small teaspo...
-Hot Breakfast Breads
Hot breads - comprising griddle-cakes, biscuits, muffins, Sally Lunns and crumpets - may not be wholesome for everybody. I seriously incline to the belief that they are not, especially in warm weather...
-Hot Breakfast Breads. Part 2
Vienna Rolls Set a plain bread sponge at six o'clock in the evening. At bedtime make out a dough as directed for home-made bread. Cover in your mixing-bowl and set in a moderately warm place until si...
-Hot Breakfast Breads. Part 3
Caraway Biscuits (Contributed) Sift together three pints of flour, one teaspoonful of salt and one and one-half teaspoonfuls of baking-powder. Rub into this four tablespoonfuls of shortening. Add tw...
-Hot Breakfast Breads. Part 4
Raised Muffins In a quart of warm milk dissolve thoroughly half a yeast-cake. Stir into this two tablespoonfuls of sugar, a teaspoonful of salt, and a tablespoonful of melted cottolene or other fat. ...
-Quick Biscuits, Etcetera
Milk Biscuits One quart flour, three cups of milk, one tablespoonful mixed butter and cottolene or other fat, one heaping teaspoonful of baking-powder, half-teaspoonful of salt. Sift the salt with th...
-Muffins And Their Congeners
Whole Wheat Muffins Into a quart of whole wheat flour stir a teaspoonful of salt and two teaspoonfuls of baking-powder. Beat three eggs light and stir them into three cups of rich milk. Add these to ...
-Waffles
Risen Waffles Four eggs; two cups of milk; three tablespoonfuls of melted butter; one tablespoonful of sugar; three cupfuls of flour, sifted with half a teaspoonful of salt; one-half yeast-cake disso...
-Griddle Cakes
If you can get a soapstone griddle, use no other. Cakes are baked - not fried - upon it, and are thereby made comparatively wholesome. Set the griddle at the side of the range to heat gradually at lea...
-Griddle Cakes. Continued
Huckleberry Griddle-Cakes (Contributed) To one cup of milk add one-half teaspoonful of salt, one tea-spoonful of baking-powder, one tablespoonful of sugar and two well beaten eggs. Add sufficient fl...
-Various Breakfast Breads Of Indian Meal
Corn Bread Made Of Northern Meal Two cupfuls of corn-meal; one cupful of flour; two and a half cupfuls of milk; three eggs; a tablespoonful, each, of butter and white sugar; one teaspoonful of salt; ...
-Various Breakfast Breads Of Indian Meal. Continued
Dinah's Corn Bread Sift two cups of corn-meal twice with an even teaspoonful of soda and as much salt. Beat two eggs very light. Mix one teaspoonful of sugar in three cups of buttermilk or loppered m...
-Divers Kinds Of Toast
Buttered Toast Cut the crusts from thin slices of stale bread and toast them over a clear fire to a delicate brown; spread lightly with butter and pile upon a hot plate; keep in the open oven until s...
-Eggs
The following method of determining the age of eggs is practised in the markets of Paris. About six ounces of common cooking salt is put into a large glass, which is then filled with water. When the ...
-Eggs. Part 2
Scrambled Eggs In Cups With a rather large tin shape cut round out of slices of stale bread an inch thick. With a small shape cut more than half through these rounds and dig out the crumb careful...
-Eggs. Part 3
Savory Eggs Dissolve a pinch of soda in a cup of cream and heat the cream. In another vessel heat a pint of stock. Turn into the stock six beaten eggs, season to taste with salt, pepper and minced pa...
-Eggs. Part 4
Omelet Aux Fines Herbes Chop finely parsley, thyme, summer savory, chives, or any green herbs you fancy; make two tablespoonfuls in all; season with paprika and celery salt. Make an omelet in the usu...
-Eggs. Part 5
Cheese Omelet Make a plain omelet, and when nearly done, strew powdered Parmesan cheese over it. Fold, transfer to a hot dish, strew more cheese on top, and hold a red-hot shovel near enough to scorc...
-Eggs. Part 6
Rice Omelet (Contributed) . To one cupful of cold boiled rice add one cupful of warm milk, one tablespoonful of melted butter, one teaspoonful of salt and a dash of pepper; mix well and add three we...
-Familiar Talk. Who Rules The Home?
The question is seldom put so baldly. Indulgent husbands yield the point in verbal gallantry. Politic wives make it a point of conscience and etiquette to speak of their husbands as owners of house an...
-Fish For Breakfast
A modern Peter Magnus, always on the alert for coincidences, once called my attention to the singular fitness of the height of the fish season and the coming of Lent. It happens uncommonly convenien...
-Fish For Breakfast. Part 2
Fried Shad Mrs. S. T. Rorer, whose authority on culinary counsels few dare dispute, says: Shad, being rich in oils, should never be fried. In tide-water Virginia, where shad are eaten in their per...
-Fish For Breakfast. Part 3
Scallops Of Shad Roes Parboil and blanch. When perfectly cold break up and pass through a colander or vegetable press. Season with lemon juice, kitchen bouquet, paprika and salt. Have ready a cup of ...
-Fish For Breakfast. Part 4
Salmon Loaf Flake cold boiled salmon and moisten it with a gill of cream, a half-gill of milk and two beaten eggs. Stir in a handful of fine crumbs, the juice of half a lemon, a tablespoonful of butt...
-Fish For Breakfast. Part 5
Fried Halibut Steaks Marinade for an hour; drain, roll in salted flour, then in beaten egg, lastly in salted and peppered crumbs. Leave on ice for an hour, and fry in clarified dripping, or in cottol...
-Fish For Breakfast. Part 6
Fried Clams Drain the clams and dry them by laying them on a soft napkin. Season with a dust of paprika. Beat two eggs light in a soup-plate and have ready in another deep plate an abundance of crack...
-Fish For Breakfast. Part 7
Fish-Balls If salt cod be used, shred it finely and soak six hours. Boil half an hour and let it cool. Mash potatoes to a cream; allow half as much potato as you have fish. Mix and heat by setting in...
-Fish For Breakfast. Part 8
Broiled Smoked Salmon Wash a piece of smoked salmon in several waters, and soak it for an hour. Cover with lukewarm water in a saucepan and simmer for twenty minutes. Drain and wipe very dry, then br...
-Familiar Talk. Where We Eat
We eat to live; we do not live to eat, is a time-stained saying. It is almost invariably uttered complacently, and seldom in absolute sincerity. There is something wrong, physically, with the man wh...
-Breakfast Meats
Breakfast Bacon Mrs. Mary J. Lincoln - than whom there is not a more trustworthy authority upon everything pertaining to cookery - says in a sprightly chapter upon breakfast bacon: It has been offe...
-Breakfast Meats. Continued
Bacon And Apples This is a favorite southern dish, and good enough to be transplanted. Slice bacon thin and fry it crisp. Transfer to a platter and keep it hot while you fry thick slices of unpeeled...
-Tripe
A much-maligned article, meet for good men's tables. It is despised and set at naught by people who should know better, because it is rarely cooked daintily. At its proper estate under the hands of a ...
-Beefsteak
Rub the hot gridiron with a bit of suet before you lay the steak upon it. The fire should be clear and hot, and yourself at leisure to watch and to turn quickly when the meat begins to drip. There are...
-Kidneys
First of all, they must be perfectly fresh. If not, they have an odor, and a peculiar tang that the unfortunate eater never forgets, and which causes him to feel an aversion for kidneys henceforth a...
-Sweetbreads
Said a maid to me once: Indeed, mem, I niver see sich another as yersel' for cookin' wild things and innards! The wild things to which she referred were quail, woodcock and hare, while the innar...
-Liver
It is not known to all housewives, even to those who practise economy from necessity or from choice - sometimes from both - that lamb's liver, which costs one-fourth as much as calf's liver, is quite ...
-Chicken
Fried Chicken Joint a tender chicken as for fricassee. Dip each piece in beaten egg, then roll in salted cracker dust until thoroughly coated. Set aside for an hour before frying in boiling cottolene...
-Some Ways Of Cooking Cold Chicken
Chicken Fritters Cook a heaping tablespoonful of flour in one tablespoonful of hot butter and one cup of chicken stock, added gradually. Season with celery salt and pepper and pour half of this sauce...
-Some Ways Of Cooking Cold Chicken. Part 2
Stewed Calf-Brains Heat a great spoonful of butter in the frying-pan and when hot, stir in a tablespoonful of flour. Add a gill of cream with salt and pepper, chopped parsley and a teaspoonful of kit...
-Some Ways Of Cooking Cold Chicken. Part 3
Minced Mutton And Tomato Toast Make three cups of good well-seasoned tomato sauce, thickened with a heaping teaspoonful of flour rubbed into one of butter. Keep hot in a double boiler set at the side...
-Breakfast Vegetables
Stewed Potatoes Pare the potatoes and cut into small dice. Cook tender in boiling water, salted. When clear, but not broken, turn off the water and cover with hot milk into which you have stirred a l...
-Breakfast Vegetables. Part 2
Stuffed Peppers Mince enough cold chicken to make a cupful and stir into it two tablespoonfuls of minced ham and one of melted butter. Season to taste. Cut the stems from green peppers so that they w...
-Breakfast Vegetables. Part 3
Tomatoes And Bacon Prepare tomatoes as in the preceding recipe, omitting the sauce. Keep them hot while you broil or fry thin slices of bacon to a delicate crisp. Arrange the tomatoes on a dish, lay ...
-Familiar Talk With Martha In Her Kitchen
(Time - The cook's afternoon out.) It is the Christian duty of every housemother in this comfort-loving land to provide a commodious, well-appointed kitchen and laundry, where daily household work ...
-Familiar Talk With Martha In Her Kitchen. Continued
I was young then and read the little story aloud to my mother - a woman blessed with a keen sense of humor and as keen a perception of the fitness of things. She adopted the phrase on the spot. Butte...
-The Family Luncheon
Fifty years ago luncheon expressed the most desultory and haphazard meal possible to enlightened humanity. School children carried lunch-boxes and parcels in the corners of book-bags when they left ho...
-Oysters
Fricasseed Oysters Drain the liquor from a quart of oysters and bring to the boiling point. Stir into it two tablespoonfuls of cracker crumbs rolled very fine. Set at the side of the range while you ...
-Oysters. Part 2
Scalloped Oysters Drain the oysters and dispose in a buttered bake-dish in the following order: In the bottom have a light layer of crushed cracker crumbs; season with paprika and salt, drop bits of...
-Oysters. Part 3
Oysters Fried In Batter Make a rather thick batter of one egg, a cupful of milk and about half a cupful of flour, sifted twice, with a scant half tea-spoonful of baking-powder and half as much salt. ...
-Oysters. Part 4
Oyster Cocktails (No. 2) For six of these provide thirty small oysters. Make a sauce by mixing together a tablespoonful, each, of lemon juice and tomato catsup, a teaspoonful of grated horseradish, a...
-Oysters. Part 5
Roast Clams Wash the clams and lay them unopened in a bake-pan, and set on the top of the very hot range. Cook until the shells open wide, then remove the upper shell and transfer the lower - with th...
-Oysters. Part 6
Lobster Cutlets Two cupfuls of minced lobster seasoned with a quarter tea-spoonful of salt, a dash of paprika, and one teaspoonful, each, of lemon juice and minced parsley. Moisten with one cup of th...
-Oysters. Part 7
Crabs En Coquille (No. 1) Two cupfuls of crab meat, cut into neat dice, and set on ice until needed. One heaping tablespoonful of flour and an even tablespoonful of butter. Four tablespoonfuls of cre...
-Shrimps
The wee shell-fish are comparatively little known in many parts of the United States except as they come in cans. Even in this shape they lend themselves to many pleasing combinations convenient for l...
-Sardines
The adaptability of the sardine to a variety of preparations that are appetizing and delicious is not generally recognized by the housekeeper. The tiny fish may be used as the foundation of many nice,...
-Sardines. Part 2
Sardine Eggs (Hot) After making out the eggs as directed in foregoing recipe, put into a saucepan with a broad bottom and closely fitting lid, and set in a pot of water at a hard boil on the range....
-Sardines. Part 3
A Curry Of Salmon Open a can of salmon two hours before using, and remove all bits of skin and bone. Pour two tablespoonfuls of olive oil into a frying-pan and fry in it a minced onion. When the onio...
-Sardines. Part 4
A Pick-Up Of Fish This is a good dish for Saturday when you are gathering up left-overs to clear decks for the Sunday which is to begin the new week. A cupful of cold, cooked fish - cod, halibut, ...
-Egg Recipes
Curried Eggs Boil seven eggs hard and throw into cold water to loosen the shells. Remove these without tearing or breaking the eggs, and cut round in slices nearly half an inch thick. Have ready in a...
-Luncheon Dishes. Part 2
Chicken Or Turkey Timbales Boil eight eggs very hard and leave them in cold water for two or more hours. Take the shells off, cut in half, and extract the yolks. Chop the whites before running them t...
-Luncheon Dishes. Part 3
Timbales Of Sweetbreads Blanch and chop two pairs of sweetbreads until as fine as powder, then rub them very smooth with the back of a silver spoon. Work into this paste a gill of sweet cream and the...
-Luncheon Dishes. Part 4
Curried Lamb Or Mutton Make in the same way, substituting either of these meats for veal. If you like, stir a little currant jelly into the gravy. Curried Chicken Joint the chicken as for frying, d...
-Luncheon Dishes. Part 5
Mince Turnovers Two cupfuls of flour, sifted twice with one rounded teaspoonful of baking-powder and half as much salt. Chop into it two table-spoonfuls of butter, and wet up with a cupful of milk, q...
-Luncheon Dishes. Part 6
Jellied Tongue Boil a tongue, and when cold place it in a brick-shaped mold. Into a pint of seasoned and heated beef stock stir a half-box of soaked gelatine, and when this is dissolved pour the stoc...
-Luncheon Dishes. Part 7
Rump Steak And Tomatoes With a sharp carving-knife split a thick rump steak, thus making two thin steaks. Spread the lower half of this with bits of butter, a little minced ham and a cupful of tomato...
-Luncheon Dishes. Part 8
How To Use Up The Cold Tongue Cut cold boiled beef-tongue into dice. Make a roux in a saucepan with two tablespoonfuls of butter and the same amount of flour, salt, pepper, and the juice of half a le...
-Luncheon Dishes. Part 9
Savory Ham Fry slices of boiled ham on both sides. Transfer to a hot dish. Cook together in a frying-pan four tablespoonfuls of vinegar, a teaspoonful of granulated sugar, a teaspoonful of French mus...
-Familiar Talk. Living To Learn
When one is too old to learn anything, his day of life is virtually over, so far as usefulness to his kind goes. The ten or twenty years left to him upon earth are a blunder on the part of some one, a...
-General Directions
(Which the housewife is particularly requested to read) Two things are essential to the excellence of croquettes. The mixture composing them must not be too stiff. The fat in which they are cooked mu...
-General Directions. Part 2
Veal And Spaghetti Croquettes Mix together a cupful, each, of cold cooked veal and of cold boiled spaghetti, both minced fine. Season with salt, paprika and onion juice. Stir into a cupful of drawn b...
-General Directions. Part 3
Fish And Potato Croquettes One cupful of cold cooked fish picked to pieces with a fork, and one-third the quantity of mashed potato worked to a stiff cream with a little drawn butter and seasoned wit...
-With The Casserole
The French name casserole has a certain amount of terror for the American housewife. The foreign word startles her and awakens visions of cooking as done by a Parisian chef, or by one who has made t...
-With The Casserole. Continued
Casserole Of Lamb Or Mutton Chops Trim the chops neatly, removing every bit of fat and skin. In the bottom of the casserole put a layer of pared and shredded tomatoes;sprinkle with salt, pepper, a li...
-Cheese Dishes For Luncheon
A Fondu Of Cheese Grate cheese and crush broken and dried bread and crusts into fine crumbs. There should be two cupfuls of these to one of cheese. Wet the crumbs with two cupfuls of milk in which ha...
-Cheese Dishes For Luncheon. Part 2
Cheese Fritters Make small sandwiches of buttered white bread (from which the crust has been removed) sliced thin and thin slices of cheese. Press each sandwich firmly, that the two pieces of bread m...
-Cheese Dishes For Luncheon. Part 3
Cheese Fingers Cut puff-paste into strips as long and as wide as your middle finger, sprinkle with a layer of cheese (grated), press upon this another strip of pastry, sprinkle with more cheese and b...
-Cheese Dishes For Luncheon. Part 4
Cream Celery In Edam Cheese Shell Cut the cleaned celery stalks into inch-lengths and cook until tender in boiling water, slightly salted. For three cupfuls of the cut celery allow a pint of white sa...
-The Toast Family
Toast, Pure And Simple Pare the crust from thin slices of bread, cut each slice in two and toast to a golden brown over a clear fire; butter lightly; pile together and throw a napkin over them. The s...
-Luncheon Vegetables
Hashed Potatoes, Browned Pare, wash and cut eight fine potatoes into small cubes, not more than half an inch square. Put these over the fire with two tablespoonfuls of minced celery and half as much ...
-Luncheon Vegetables. Part 2
Sweet Potato Puff Into two cupfuls of boiled and mashed sweet potatoes beat three tablespoonfuls of melted butter, a cupful of milk and four beaten eggs. Salt to taste, beat hard and turn into a grea...
-Luncheon Vegetables. Part 3
Scallop Of Tomatoes And Eggs Into a pint of stewed tomatoes stir a generous cupful of fine bread crumbs, a tablespoonful of melted butter, a half teaspoonful of sugar, pepper and salt to taste. Mix t...
-Sandwiches
The day has passed and forever when a sandwich meant two thick slices of bread, enclosing what the boys call a hunk of cold meat. Now the popular delicacy is made of bread cut to wafer-like thinness...
-Sandwiches. Part 2
Water Cress Sandwiches Season water cress with salt, pepper, and a few drops of vinegar, and chop coarsely. Mix with creamy cottage cheese and spread on thinly-sliced white bread. Cottage Cheese San...
-Sandwiches. Part 3
Date And Nut Sandwiches (Contributed) Remove the stones and the thick skin which surrounds them from the dates, then chop them fine. Add half as much finelychopped English walnut or pecan meats; mois...
-Tempting Prefixes To Luncheon
Grape Fruit This is among the most popular of appetizers to be served at a luncheon. Cut the fruit in half, crosswise, and with a sharp knife remove all the bitter white membrane that divides the lob...
-Salads
In a Familiar Talk, some pages back, I have alluded to the Woman with a Way, who will not use oil in salad dressing. A story which stuck to an eminent magazine publisher to the end of his busy caree...
-Salads. Part 2
Sour Cream Salad Dressing Have a cupful of rich sour cream very cold, then beat hard for five minutes, adding, as you do so, a tablespoonful of powdered sugar and a half teaspoonful of lemon juice. T...
-Salads. Part 3
Crab And Tomato Salad Carefully strip the skin from six large, firm tomatoes, and remove the centers. Fill the hollowed vegetables with the chopped and seasoned meat of six boiled crabs. Set the stuf...
-Salads. Part 4
Lettuce And Tomato Salad After tearing the lettuce apart, lay, as on a bed, tomatoes pared and sliced, or cut into eighths. Pour the dressing over them. Salad should never be touched with one's own ...
-Salads. Part 5
A Fruit Salad Pare four juicy, sweet oranges, peel off every bit of the white inner skin from the fruit it incloses, pull the lobes apart, and cut each into four pieces. Scald a cupful of English wa...
-Salads. Part 6
Dandelion Salad Pick the young tender leaves of the dandelion, wash and lay in ice water for half an hour. Drain, shake dry and pat still drier between the folds of a napkin. Turn into a chilled bowl...
-Salads. Part 7
Tomato Aspic Soak a half-box of gelatine in a half-pint of water for an hour. Bring to a boil the liquor drained from a quart can of tomatoes, and add to it a teaspoonful of onion juice, two teaspoo...
-Salads. Part 8
Asparagus And Shrimp Salad (Contributed) To one cupful of shrimps add two cupfuls of cold cooked asparagus tips, and toss lightly together. Season with salt and pepper. Make a dressing of the yolks ...
-Salads. Part 9
Ham Salad (Contributed) Mix equal portions of minced, well-cooked ham and English walnuts or almonds. Serve with mayonnaise on lettuce leaves. Sweetbreads With Celery Salad (Contributed) Wash the...
-Luncheon Fruits, Cooked And Raw
Stewed Rhubarb Select only good, firm stalks, and reject those that are withered. Lay them in cold water for an hour, and cut into half-inch pieces. Put them over the fire in a porcelain-lined saucep...
-Luncheon Fruits, Cooked And Raw. Part 2
Cold Apple Sauce Make in the same way of ripe, tart apples, a seasoning with mace or nutmeg to taste. When it has cooled set on ice until wanted. Stewed Apples Pare and core a dozen tart, juicy app...
-Luncheon Fruits, Cooked And Raw. Part 3
Raw Cherries To be eaten at their raw best they should be kept in the icebox until needed. Then they may be served with their stems still on in a glass bowl with fragments of ice scattered among them...
-Sweet Omelets
Apple Sauce Omelet (Baked) Beat the yolks of seven eggs light; stir into them five table-spoonfuls of powdered sugar and a cupful and a half of sweetened apple sauce. Beat long and hard, stir in the ...
-Familiar Talk. A Commonsensible Talk With The Nominal Mistress Of The House
There is not that household in the land where servants are employed which is not measurably dependent upon them for peace of mind as well as for comfort of body. Every housewife who reads this will re...
-A Commonsensible Talk With The Nominal Mistress Of The House. Part 2
Nevertheless, I kept blue-eyed Margaret for eight years. She stands out in my grateful memory as the one and only maid I have ever had who washed dishes in my way. Never having learned any other, sh...
-A Commonsensible Talk With The Nominal House Mistress. Part 3
Call the distinctive dress of your maid a uniform, not a livery. Point out to her the examples of trained nurses, of railway conductors, of the very porters who keep company with her; the policeme...
-Luncheon Cakes
Huckleberry Shortcake Sift two heaping teaspoonfuls of baking-powder and one of salt into a quart and a pint of flour. Chop into this two table-spoonfuls of cottolene or other fat and two of butter. ...
-Luncheon Cakes. Part 2
German Coffee Cake (No. 1) Two cupfuls of scalded milk, one cupful of water, one yeast-cake (one-cent size), one cupful of sugar, one-half cupful of butter, two eggs, a little salt. Cream sugar and ...
-Luncheon Cakes. Part 3
Springerlein (No. 2) (An old German recipe.) One cup of powdered sugar, rolled fine, sifted and warmed. Four large eggs. Grated rind of one lemon. One pound of flour thoroughly dried and sifted thre...
-Luncheon Cakes. Part 4
Bun Loaf (An English recipe.) Cream together half a cupful of mixed butter and lard with a half-cupful of brown sugar; beat into this one egg and work both into a cupful of bread dough that has had ...
-Luncheon Cakes. Part 5
Grafton Cake Cream together three tablespoonfuls of butter with two cupfuls of sugar and beat into these the yolks of three eggs, whipped light. Add a cupful of cold water and two cupfuls of sifted f...
-Luncheon Cakes. Part 6
Old-Fashioned Sponge Cake Weigh ten eggs; allow their weight in sugar, and half their weight in flour. Beat the yolks light, whip the sugar into them, stir in half the grated peel and all the juice o...
-Luncheon Cakes. Part 7
Kleiner (A Danish recipe.) The yolks of six eggs, the yolks and whites of two eggs, one-quarter of a pound of sugar. Whip these together, add two table-spoonfuls of cream, one ounce of melted butter...
-Luncheon Cakes. Part 8
Orange Layer Cake Cream three tablespoonfuls of butter with two cupfuls of sugar, add the beaten yolks of five eggs, the juice and half the grated rind of an orange, and three cupfuls of flour - or e...
-Luncheon Cakes. Part 9
White Mountain Cake Into three cupfuls of sugar rub one cupful of butter and stir in a half-cupful of sweet milk. Add four cupfuls of prepared flour alternately with the stiffened whites of ten eggs....
-Luncheon Cakes. Part 10
Filling For Marshmallow Cake Dissolve five tablespoonfuls of gum arabic in a gill of cold water; then stir in a half-cupful of powdered sugar and boil all together until a little dropped in cold wate...
-Luncheon Cakes. Part 11
One Egg Cake (Contributed) Cream one-half cup of butter, two cupfuls of sugar; add one egg beaten light, one cupful of milk, one teaspoonful of vanilla, and two cupfuls of flour into which have been...
-Frostings Foe Cakes
Boiled Frosting For Cake Put into a saucepan half a cupful of water and a pound of granulated sugar and let it boil slowly. Do not stir. When it spins a thread from the tip of a spoon dipped into it,...
-Gingerbreads
Molasses Gingerbread (No. 1) Warm together two cupfuls of molasses, a half cupful each of cottolene or other fat and butter, and two tablespoonfuls of ground ginger, and when a little more than blood...
-Small Cakes
What the old-fashioned people call dough cakes - what we term cookies or jumbles - are amongst the most popular small cakes that the housemother can present to her brood. The only trouble is tha...
-Small Cakes. Part 2
German Almond Cookies The yolks of six eggs; one and a half cupfuls of sugar; three-quarters of a cupful of butter; one cupful of almonds, chopped; one tablespoonful of cinnamon; three cupfuls of flo...
-Small Cakes. Part 3
Alma's Drop Cakes Beat five eggs light - yolks and whites separately. Into the yolks stir a cupful of powdered sugar, the juice of a lemon and half the grated peel - then the stiffened whites of the ...
-Small Cakes. Part 4
Gingersnaps (No. 2) Cream a cupful of butter with one of sugar, beat in a cupful of molasses, stir in a cupful of water, a teaspoonful each of ground ginger and cinnamon, a teaspoonful of allspice an...
-The Doughnut And Cruller Family
These crisp and toothsome dainties may be made several weeks before they are needed, as they improve with age. Keep them in a stone crock, or large tin cracker-box with a closely-fitting cover. As you...
-Familiar Talk. A Friendly Word With "Our Maid"
To begin with - I wish I could devise some method of convincing you that I am really and truly friendly. A newspaper article I have just read says, It can not be denied that the present attitude o...
-Dinner
This, the most important meal of the day, is attended with a certain degree of ceremony in the most modest household. Breakfast may be hurried over in haste that is not unseemly when one considers tha...
-Soups
It is a progressive age and the average American housewife is slowly coming to some appreciation of the nutritive value of soups as an article of daily food. As a rule of wide application, she does no...
-Soups. Part 2
Veal And Tapioca Soup Crack a knuckle of veal into six pieces and put over the fire with a cracked ham bone, if you have it. If not, use a half-pound of lean salt pork, chopped, or the soaked rind of...
-Soups. Part 3
Clear Soup With Poached Eggs Make as directed above, but without tapioca or other cereal. Have ready as many neatly poached eggs as there will be people at table, and when the hot soup is in the ture...
-Soups. Part 4
Chicken Cream Soup (No. 1) Cut up a large fowl and beat with a mallet to crack the bones; pour in five quarts of cold water, cover closely and simmer for four hours more, until the chicken is perfect...
-Soups. Part 5
Chicken Bouillon (No. 2) Cut a four-pound fowl into pieces and put it over the fire with four quarts of cold water. Bring very slowly to the boiling point, and simmer gently for three hours, or until...
-Soups. Part 6
French Onion Soup To a quart of good stock allow six small onions that have been parboiled for ten minutes, and a cupful of fine, dry bread-crumbs. Let them simmer together for half an hour; rub the ...
-Soups. Part 7
Beef Juice For Invalids Chop two pounds of lean beef small. Put a layer of this meat in the bottom of a glass jar and sprinkle over it a little salt. Then add another layer and a little more salt, an...
-Bisques
The name is applied to a class of soups thickened into closer consistency than broth by the addition of minced meat and crumbs. When well made, they are popular at family dinners, and some kinds - suc...
-Bisques. Continued
Chicken Bisque Joint the fowl and cover with cold water, a quart for each pound. Put in a large minced onion and three stalks of celery, minced fine. Cover and cook slowly until you can slip the fles...
-Cream Soups
N. B. - See to it that the milk of which they are made is fresh, and always drop in it before heating a pinch of baking-soda to avoid the danger of curdling. A curdled cream soup is a culinary solecis...
-Cream Soups. Continued
Potato Cream Soup (No. 1) Mash ten large boiled potatoes, beat them to a soft mass with a half pint of cream, and season to taste with salt, pepper and a teaspoonful of onion juice. Heat a pint of mi...
-Vegetable Soups With Meat
Potato Puree Peel and slice a quart of good old potatoes. Put them into the soup kettle with a large sliced onion, three stalks of celery cut into inch pieces, a quarter of a pound of butter, and p...
-Vegetable Soups With Meat. Part 2
Green Pea Puree (No. 1) Shell two quarts of peas and leave in cold water. Wash the pods and put them over the fire to boil in a quart of veal or mutton stock. Boil for twenty minutes, then drain out ...
-Vegetable Soups With Meat. Part 3
Okra Soup Into a quart of chicken stock stir two slices of corned ham, minced, a chopped onion and two dozen okra. Add a pint of strained tomatoes and boil all until the okra is tender. Season to tas...
-Vegetable Soups Without Meat
Split Pea Soup Soak a large cup of split peas all night, then put them over the fire with two quarts of water and bring to a boil. Simmer gently until the peas are soft. Rub through a colander, retur...
-Vegetable Soups Without Meat. Continued
Turnip Soup Make as directed in last recipe. Rice And Tomato Soup Peel and cut up a dozen ripe tomatoes and boil to a pulp in a quart of salted water. Strain, return to the fire, and add two tables...
-Fish Soups
Red Snapper Soup Heat a quart of white stock to a boil. Stir in two cupfuls of the cold cooked fish, freed of skin and bones, and minced finely. Add pepper, salt, a tablespoonful of chopped parsley a...
-Fish
Baked Red Snapper A fish that is earning, and honestly, much popularity. It would have all it deserved if it were always cooked properly. It is not a fish with which one can take liberties. Draw, cl...
-Fish. Part 2
Cream Gravy For Black Bass Cook together a tablespoonful, each, of butter and flour, and when blended strain slowly upon them a cupful of the water in which the bass was boiled, and stir until smooth...
-Fish. Part 3
Boiled Fresh Codfish Lay the fish in salt and water for an hour before cooking. Choose a chunky piece, as nearly square as you can get it. Sew up in white mosquito netting fitted to the shape of th...
-Fish. Part 4
Baked Halibut Steak (No. 2) Wash, wipe and lay in marinade of olive oil and lemon juice for one hour. Sprinkle, then, liberally, with minced onion, parsley and lemon juice, turning over and over that...
-Fish. Part 5
Baked Salmon Wipe your fish with a damp cloth, but do not lay it in water. Rub with a little salad oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Lay in a baking-pan and dash over it a cupful of boiling wate...
-Fish. Part 6
Fried Soft-Shell Crabs Prepare as directed in preceding recipe, sprinkle with cayenne and salt, roll in beaten egg, then in fine crumbs, again in egg, and once more in crumbs and fry in deep, hot fat...
-Fish. Part 7
Fricasseed Snapping Turtle Have your fish merchant clean your turtle after he has killed him by throwing him into boiling water. Cut the turtle into neat dice, sprinkle with salt, pepper, onion juice...
-Fish. Part 8
Oyster Pie Line a deep pie-plate with puff paste, fill the interior with bread crusts (to be removed later) and fit on a top crust, buttered about the edge on the under side that it may be easily tak...
-Fish. Part 9
Oyster Cutlets (Contributed) Drain off the liquor and wash the oysters well. Put them into a saucepan over the fire and heat until the edges curl, being careful to stir all the time. Strain the liqu...
-Sauces For Fish And Meat
Drawn Butter (White Sauce) Heat two tablespoonfuls of butter in a saucepan. When it bubbles put in (all at once) two tablespoonfuls of flour, and stir from the sides towards the center of the pan u...
-Sauces For Fish And Meat. Part 2
Horseradish Sauce Into a cupful of drawn butter beat a great spoonful of grated horseradish wet with lemon juice, and work to creamy whiteness. Anchovy Sauce Beat a tablespoonful of anchovy paste i...
-Sauces For Fish And Meat. Part 3
Claret Or Bordelaise Sauce Make a brown sauce by substituting browned flour for white in the roux, adding a teaspoonful of kitchen bouquet. Season with onion juice, salt and pepper, boil one minute, ...
-Familiar Talk. Is Impromptu Hospitality A Lost Art?
Without staying to prove my premises I take it for granted nobody will dispute that what it pleases me to call impromptu hospitality is an out-of-date virtue. In the very olden time there were those ...
-Beef
Roast Beef Never wash a raw roast, at least not the parts unprotected by the thin skin. Wipe the skin off with vinegar, dry with a soft cloth, and lay the meat, cut sides at top and bottom, upon the ...
-Beef. Part 2
Rib-Ends Of Beef These are usually cut off when the roast is rolled, and can be bought cheap. Fry in beef fat a sliced onion and a chopped sweet pepper - carefully seeded. Take these up with a skimm...
-Beef. Part 3
Beef A La Mode (No. 2) Have a solid piece cut from the round, and tie into shape with stout cords at intervals of an inch apart. Plug the meat perpendicularly with strips of fat salt pork, long enoug...
-Beef. Part 4
A Family Pot-Roast Of Beef The round will serve for this dish. Fry slices of fat salt pork in an iron pot, and when crisp, remove and throw in a sliced onion. When this is browned, remove and lay the...
-Beef. Part 5
Braised Fresh Beef's Tongue (No. 1) Wash the tongue and boil for half an hour. Trim away the root and the tough edges. Fry a sliced onion in three tablespoonfuls of dripping. Strain out the onion an...
-Beef. Part 6
Boiled Beef's Heart Wash the heart and soak for half an hour in cold, salted water, Wipe and stuff the ventricles with a forcemeat of bread-crumbs and chopped ham or salt pork, minced fine and well s...
-Veal
Roast Leg Of Veal Wipe a leg of veal with a damp cloth and place it in a covered roaster. Dash a cupful of boiling water over the meat, cover it closely and cook at the rate of twenty minutes to the ...
-Veal. Part 2
Roast Breast Of Veal Cook as you would the fillet, running a sharp knife between ribs and meat to make space for the stuffing. Serve spinach with it. Breaded Veal Cutlets Roll the cutlets in fine c...
-Veal. Part 3
Larded Liver Wash a calf's or lamb's liver, lard it with narrow strips of salt pork, and put it into a covered roaster. Pour over the liver a pint of cold beef stock and cover the pan closely. Set in...
-Veal. Part 4
Boiled Calf's Head Boil as directed in last recipe, but do not blanch or bone. When it has been cooked tender, dish, with the tongue (which should have been boiled with it), sliced and laid against t...
-Mutton
Roast Leg Of Mutton With Sorrel Sauce Wipe a leg of young mutton with a damp cloth, then with a dry. Put into a covered roaster, dash a cupful of boiling water over it and roast at the rate of twelve...
-Meat And Poultry Pies
Chicken Pie Cut at every joint a pair of young chickens. Lay on ice while you make a gravy of the pinions, necks and feet - scalding and skinning the feet before putting with the rest over the fire, ...
-Meat And Poultry Pies. Part 2
Chicken And Ham Pie Cut up and stew the chickens, as in last recipe. Have ready four good-sized slices of corned ham (not smoked), boiled and cold, and cut into strips. Put a layer of ham in the bott...
-Meat And Poultry Pies. Part 3
Beefsteak Pie Cut two pounds of round steak into small squares. Cover (barely) with cold water and cook tender, very slowly. Cut two veal kidneys into cubes and (if you can get it) a sweetbread, blan...
-Meat And Poultry Pies. Part 4
An English Pork Pie Cook two pounds of lean pork for half an hour in enough weak stock to cover it. Let it get cold in the liquor (which reserve for the gravy). Take out the cold meat and cut into ne...
-Pork
Roast Pig Lay the pig, which has been prepared by the butcher, in cold water for fifteen minutes, then wipe dry, inside and out. Make a stuffing as for a turkey, and work into it two beaten eggs. Stu...
-Pork. Continued
Boiled Ham Soak eight hours, and scrub it hard with a stiff brush or whisk to get out salt and dirt. Cover with an abundance of cold water, and put into it two tablespoonfuls of vinegar. Heat very gr...
-Roast Turkey
Draw, with care not to break the gall-bag. Wash out the cavity three times with cold water, adding a little soda to the second water. You can not be too careful in this part of your task. Fill the bo...
-Roast Turkey. Continued
Roast Turkey, Rechauffe When but half of a large turkey has been cut away, the remainder can be made presentable for a second serving by braising it thus: Cut very thin slices of fat salt pork and...
-Ducks
Roast Ducks Draw and clean, washing the inside in three waters, the second having a teaspoonful of baking-soda mixed with it. Plunge into ice-cold water; leave them there for fifteen minutes;wipe we...
-Poultry And Entrees
Serve with currant jelly, or apple sauce, and pass green peas with them. Braised Ducks Young ducks are essential for this purpose. Lay three slices of fat corned ham upon the grating of your roaster...
-Chickens
Roast Chickens Singe to get rid of down, draw and wash well, rinsing the cavity of each fowl with soda and water. Wipe and fill bodies and craws with a stuffing of dry crumbs, well-seasoned with pepp...
-Chickens. Part 2
Braised Chicken Cover the grating of your roaster with a blanket of vegetables; a carrot, a small young turnip, an onion, a young carrot, a stalk of celery, all cut up small; a little chopped parsley...
-Chickens. Part 3
A Pilau Of Chicken Joint a tender broiler and leave for half an hour in a bath of salad oil and lemon juice. Drain, without wiping. Have ready three tablespoonfuls of butter, hissing hot, in a frying...
-Chickens. Part 4
Dumplings For Chicken Stew Into a pint of flour sift a heaping teaspoonful of baking-powder, and a quarter-teaspoonful of salt, and sift the flour twice. Now rub in a tablespoonful of shortening and ...
-Geese
Boast Goose Draw, clean, singe and truss as you would prepare a turkey. Always put onion and a suspicion of sage in the stuffing. Lay upon the grating of your roaster; pour a cup of boiling water ove...
-Game
The lower one descends in the social scale the less appreciation is there of game of any variety. What the plebeian terms wild things play a small part upon his menu - indeed, are probably altoget...
-Rabbits And Hakes
In America hare and rabbit are interchangeable terms. The wild rabbit of the Middle States and New England is the old hare of the South, and one with the Br'er Rabbit of negro folklore. Hence ...
-Rabbits And Hakes. Continued
Stewed Rabbits Clean and joint as for the casserole, cutting each joint and halving the backs. Proceed in the same way, also, to fry the pork, onion and meat when you have peppered, salted and floure...
-Squirrels
The large gray squirrel of the Southern and Middle States is reckoned by many epicures as superior to rabbits or hares in richness and delicacy of flavor. The small red roisterer who chatters in grove...
-Game Pies
Squirrel Pie Clean and joint the squirrels, cutting the backs into three pieces, each. Put six slices of fat salt pork into a saucepan, fry three minutes, then put in the squirrels and fry to a light...
-The Aristocratic Asparagus
A writer upon dietetics says - whether truthfully or not each of us can judge for himself - Asparagus has nothing plebeian about it, as has the onion, the potato, the cabbage, turnip or parsnip. It i...
-Artichokes
The American artichoke, indigenous to this country, has received, nobody living can say why, the absurd name of Jerusalem artichoke. It is a tuber, resembling in appearance a turnip when cooked, but...
-Bananas
Bananas Sautes Peel, cut lengthwise into thirds; roll in flour, slightly salted and peppered. Heat two tablespoonfuls of butter, or clarified dripping in a frying-pan; put in the bananas and fry to a...
-Beans
Boston Baked Beans (No. 1) Soak a quart of beans in cold water all night. In the morning soak them for two hours in warm water. Drain, put into a pot with enough water to cover them, and bring them s...
-Beans. Continued
Baked Beans With Tomato Sauce Soak white beans over night in cold water, and in the morning put over the fire in boiling water, slightly salted. Cook until tender. Drain and put into a deep dish. Cov...
-Beets
Boiled Beets As the preliminary process to all dishes composed of beets is boiling it is well to learn exactly how this should be done. Too often the once ruddy vegetable is allowed to bleed out it...
-Brussels Sprouts
Boiled Brussels Sprouts Remove the outer leaves and lay the sprouts in cold salted water for three-quarters of an hour. Drain and boil in salted water for about fifteen minutes, or until tender. Try ...
-Cabbage
Those who know cabbage as it is served with the old-fashioned boiled dinner have no conception of the many delightful changes of which this so-called plebeian vegetable is susceptible. In summer, wh...
-Carrots
Stewed Carrots Wash, scrape off the skin, cut into dice and leave in cold water for half an hour. Put, then, into the inner compartment of a double boiler with no water upon them except that which cl...
-Cauliflower
Cauliflower Boiled Whole Choose a fine, white head for this purpose. Put it, flower downward, into ice-cold salted water for half an hour. Tie, then, in coarse cheese-cloth or netting, and plunge, he...
-Celery
Stewed Celery (No. 1) Wash the celery, cut into half-inch bits, and stew tender in slightly-salted boiling water. Drain this off and add a cupful of milk. Cook for three minutes, stir in a teaspoonfu...
-Green Corn
Boiled Corn Strip husk and silk from the ear and put over the fire in plenty of boiling water, slightly salted. Boil hard for twenty minutes if the corn be young and fresh. Send to table wrapped in ...
-Cucumbers
Many persons look upon the cucumber with fear as a source of indigestion and gastric discomfort. One able dietitian has left on record his opinion that a square inch of verdant cucumber is about as fi...
-Chestnuts
The large Spanish chestnuts sold by grocers in the city, and in the markets, make excellent puddings with or without sugar, and, as vegetables, go well with poultry and beef. Chestnut Pudding Boil a...
-Dandelions
Make a wholesome and, to some tastes, palatable greens in the spring of the year. They must be gathered while very young and tender, or they are bitter. The best time to cut them is just before they...
-Eggplant - A Much Abused Vegetable
Tens of thousands of average American housewives know but one way of cooking it, and not one in a hundred performs that one properly. Fried eggplant is one of the many dishes which remind the eater o...
-Hominy
The small-grained hominy, called at the South samp, after the manner of the aborigines who bequeathed it to us, must be used in the recipes which follow. Plain Hominy Pudding Soak a cupful of homi...
-Kale
This vegetable, otherwise known as sea-kale, should be better known in our country. In England it takes high rank and holds it creditably. Pick it over carefully, clip off the stems and lay it in c...
-Macaroni
Few articles of diet are more toothsome and more wholesome than macaroni in its various forms when properly prepared. Like rice, it is so often miserably cooked that its excellent qualities are not ge...
-Macaroni. Continued
Macaroni And Tomatoes (Very Nice) Break half a pound of pipe macaroni into inch-lengths, and boil in salted water until tender. Drain, and put a layer of the macaroni in the bottom of a greased puddi...
-Mushrooms
It is a pity there should be such a popular dread of the poisonous toadstool that his nutritious and innocuous brother - the edible mushroom - is shunned by thousands of rational creatures. The most...
-Onions
A once-despised vegetable which now takes rank as a highly-respectable edible upon good men's - and women's - tables. Delicate spinsters no longer faint at fumes of boiled onions, and finical housewiv...
-Green Peas
They lose sweetness with every hour - I might say with every minute - that passes after they have been picked. The passage from garden to kitchen and from pod to pot should be made as short as possibl...
-Peppers
The large, green peppers, known to the green-grocer as sweet peppers, have grown rapidly into favor as a fresh vegetable, within the last decade. They must be seeded with the utmost care. A touch of...
-Poke Stalks
Cut as you would asparagus, when they are but a few inches high. They are then tender and succulent, and are thought by some imaginative vegetarians to resemble the aristocrat in flavor. They are u...
-Potatoes
The Tyrant Potato is not assailed ignorantly, nor yet flippantly. After careful study of its properties, its works and its ways, the utmost concession that is now made to peculiar prejudice is in th...
-Potatoes. Part 2
Baked Potatoes (No. 1) Select fine potatoes of uniform size. Wash, wipe and bake until the largest yields to the pressure of thumb and finger. Serve wrapped in a hot napkin. If the eater will knead h...
-Potatoes. Part 3
Scalloped Potatoes Put a layer of sliced cold-boiled potatoes in the bottom of a buttered pudding-dish, sprinkle with crumbs and bits of butter. Put in another layer of potatoes and more crumbs until...
-Potatoes. Part 4
Savory Potatoes Heat in a double boiler a quart of milk and put into it three sliced onions. Boil for ten minutes, strain out the onions, return the milk to the fire, and stir into it two teaspoonful...
-Potatoes. Part 5
Potatoes Parisienne Parisienne potatoes are cut into small balls from raw potatoes with a French vegetable cutter or a round spoon. They may be either fried, or boiled and served with maitre d'hotel ...
-Sweet Potatoes
Boiled Sweet Potatoes Wash and cook in boiling water until soft. Set in a moderate oven for ten minutes to keep them from being watery. Baked Sweet Potatoes They are seldom cooked in any other way ...
-Rice
Boiled Rice Into three pints of hot salted water, when at a fast boil, throw half a cupful of raw rice, previously washed and picked over. Keep it at a furious boil for twenty minutes, when test a gr...
-Rice. Continued
Savory Rice Prepare as in last recipe, but add a small cupful of good stock to an equal quantity of tomato sauce; cook together for two minutes and pour over the rice. Bice Pudding As A Vegetable B...
-Salsify, Or Oyster-Plant
Stewed Salsify Scrape the roots, throwing them at once into cold water, that they may not blacken. Cut into inch lengths and put over the fire in boiling salted water. Stew until tender. Drain off th...
-Spinach
Spinach is one of our most valuable vegetables. It contains salts and is slightly laxative. In order to retain all the nutritive value and the salts in the spinach it is best to cook in a steamer. It...
-Squash
The summer squash differs from the winter variety in having a tender shell and in being very juicy. Both may be cooked in a variety of ways, and form many appetizing dishes. In opening the winter squa...
-Tomatoes
The nineteenth century was a third gone before the world on this side of the sea began to appreciate the beneficent qualities of what our foremothers used to call love apples. There is no other vege...
-Tomatoes. Part 2
Raw Tomatoes And Whipped Cream Pare large, smooth tomatoes carefully, and set on ice until chilled to the heart. Cut each in half when ready to serve, sprinkle lightly with salt and paprika, and heap...
-Tomatoes. Part 3
Tomatoes Stuffed With Meat Select large, firm tomatoes, cut off the tops and scoop out the inside pulp. Do not peel. Chop fine a cupful of cold meat - it may be fowl, tongue or ham, or even lamb, mut...
-Turnips
Mashed Turnips Peel, lay in cold water for an hour; boil tender in hot, salted water; throw this off and fill up the pot with boiling- water, slightly salted. Cook five minutes in this, drain well an...
-A Word About Nuts
Nuts of all kinds are gaining in favor as articles of diet, and are at their best in the autumn and winter. They may be bought, shelled and packed in boxes, so that they are ready for immediate use. T...
-Even-Threaded Living
Come what may, appearances must be kept up! wrote a venerable gentlewoman to her daughter, with whom life had grown suddenly hard by reason of her husband's pecuniary losses. Show a brave front to ...
-Pies
Pastry Have all ingredients very cold. Into a pound of flour chop three-quarters of a cup of firm, cold butter. When the flour is like a coarse powder stir into it a small cupful of iced water. With ...
-Pies. Part 2
Mince Pie Returning to our New York editorial, the amused reader finds this eulogium upon mince pie: There goes much skill to the making of a mince pie. Within the fortunate inwards of the presiden...
-Pies. Part 3
Pumpkin Pie (No. 1) Belongs to the noble order of the unkivered pie. Add the beaten yolks of four eggs and one cupful of white sugar to two cupfuls of pumpkin that has been stewed and put through ...
-Pies. Part 4
Cocoanut Pie Cream a half-cupful of butter with two scant cupfuls of powdered sugar, and when very light add half a grated cocoanut and a generous tablespoonful of rose-water. Now fold in quickly a...
-Pies. Part 5
Creamed Apple-Sauce Pie Bake your crusts as directed in preceding recipe. When you separate them, spread with well-sweetened apple-sauce beaten light; cover with whipped cream; lay on the upper crust...
-Pies. Part 6
Cherry Pie Many persons make a cherry pie without stoning the cherries. That stoning them is a trouble is not to be denied, but the result is so satisfactory that it really seems worth while to take ...
-Pies. Part 7
Sweet Potato Pie Parboil, peel, and when cold, grate enough sweet potatoes to make a pound. Cream a half cupful of butter with three-quarters of a cupful of sugar and the beaten yolks of four eggs, a...
-Pies. Part 8
Custard Pie Make a custard by pouring three cupfuls of scalding milk upon four eggs that have been beaten light with four tablespoonfuls of sugar. Flavor with vanilla, and pour into a pie-dish lined ...
-Pies. Part 9
Fried Tartlets Make a rich puff paste and cut it into pieces six inches square. In the center of each square put a great spoonful of raspberry, strawberry, currant or gooseberry jam. Pinch the four c...
-Hot Puddings
Boiled Puddings Before attempting a boiled pudding, be sure that you have a good mold with a tightly-fitting cover in which to cook it. You may use such a substitute as a bowl with a floured cloth ti...
-Hot Puddings. Part 2
Plum Pudding (No. 2) Half a pound, each, of sugar and suet; a quarter of a pound of butter; five cupfuls of flour; one pound, each, of cleaned currants and of raisins; two tablespoonfuls of shredded ...
-Hot Puddings. Part 3
Boiled Indian Pudding (No. 1) Heat a quart of milk to scalding, and beat into it gradually three cupfuls of Indian meal, into which you have stirred a scant teaspoonful of salt. When the meal is thor...
-Hot Puddings. Part 4
Raisin Pudding Wash and seed a cupful and a half of raisins, and dredge them thickly with flour. Chop a cupful of suet very fine, removing all particles of string. It should be like powder. To this a...
-Hot Puddings. Part 5
Suet Pudding Slightly warm and stir together one cupful of molasses and one of suet, freed from strings and powdered. Have ready a cupful of seeded and minced raisins and two even cupfuls of flour, s...
-Hot Puddings. Part 6
Cherry Roly-Poly (Contributed) Sift one teaspoonful of salt and three level teaspoonfuls of baking-powder into one pint of flour; rub into this one tablespoonful of butter and moisten with enough mi...
-Baked Puddings
Baked Prune Pudding (No. 1) Stone and chop eighteen stewed prunes. Beat the yolks of four eggs light with two tablespoonfuls of sugar. Cook together in a saucepan one tablespoonful of butter and two ...
-Baked Puddings. Part 2
Apple And Tapioca Pudding Soak a cupful of tapioca for two hours in enough cold water to cover it. Lay, side by side, in a deep bake-dish apples that have been pared and cored. Pour over them a cupfu...
-Baked Puddings. Part 3
Cherry Pudding Stem and stone two heaping cupfuls of cherries. Beat three eggs light and stir into them a pint of milk, a tablespoonful of melted butter, and a quart of flour which has been twice sif...
-Baked Puddings. Part 4
Canned Peach Puddings Sift twice with two cupfuls of flour a heaping teaspoonful of baking-powder and a half teaspoonful of salt. Chop into this a tablespoonful of butter. Beat two eggs light, and mi...
-Baked Puddings. Part 5
Bread-Crumb Pudding Soak a pint of fine dry bread-crumbs for two hours in a quart of milk, then beat in two tablespoonfuls of melted butter, a half teaspoonful of powdered nutmeg, the whipped yolks a...
-Baked Puddings. Part 6
A Baked Charlotte Slice stale cake as neatly as may be. Spread each piece with jam or jelly; pack closely in a greased pudding-dish; pour over it a raw custard made by beating an egg very light and s...
-Baked Puddings. Part 7
Bread-Crumb Pudding Soak three cupfuls of fine crumbs for an hour in a quart of milk. Beat into the soaked crumbs four eggs, whipped light, a tablespoonful of melted butter and a teaspoonful of vanil...
-Baked Puddings. Part 8
Frumenty (Old English recipe) Cook a cupful of raw rice with two cupfuls of hot water in the inner vessel of a double boiler for half an hour. Then turn it into three cupfuls of milk heated in the d...
-Baked Puddings. Part 9
Rhubarb Souffle Soak half a cupful of bread-crumbs for an hour in a cupful of milk. Beat six eggs light, yolks and whites separate. Stir the thickened yolks into the soaked crumbs; add a cupful of st...
-Fritters
In making fritters an essential to their success is that the fat in which they are fried be very deep and boiling hot. Always test it by dropping into it a small spoonful of batter. If this do not ris...
-Fritters. Continued
Rhubarb Fritters Scrape the stalks of the rhubarb, cut into quarter-inch lengths; stew in sugar and water for ten minutes; drain and set aside to get cold. Make a batter of a half-pint of milk, thre...
-Pancakes And Dumplings
Risen Pancakes Make a sponge of a quart of flour, a half-cake of compressed yeast dissolved in a little water, and a teaspoonful of salt. Set to rise all night; in the morning beat in three well-whip...
-Some Pudding Sauces
Cream Sauce Work two tablespoonfuls of butter into a half cupful of sugar, then the beaten yolks of two eggs and a cupful of rich cream, to which a pinch of soda has been added. Cook altogether, stir...
-Cold Puddings And Custards
Besides the ordinary baked and boiled custards, there are many varieties which are easily prepared, and are delicious, as well as digestible. The milk of which these are made should always have added ...
-Cold Puddings And Custards. Continued
Tapioca Cocoanut Custard Make as directed in last recipe, but add to the beaten whites at the last a cupful of finely-grated cocoanut sweetened with powdered sugar. Floating Island Heat a pint of m...
-Whipped Cream Dishes
The easiest and most rapid way to whip cream is with an ordinary, old-fashioned wire egg-whip. Put the cream into a shallow dish and set in the ice-box until thoroughly chilled. Into a half-pint stir ...
-Whipped Cream Dishes. Continued
Peach Tapioca Soak a cup of tapioca over night. Peel and cut up ten peaches; add a cup of sugar and stew until tender. Boil the tapioca in two cups of water until clear, then stir the stewed peaches ...
-Blanc Mange
Arrowroot Blanc Mange Put half a pint of milk into a double boiler, and when it reaches the scalding point stir into it three heaping teaspoonfuls of arrowroot which have been dissolved in a gill of ...
-Blanc Mange. Part 2
Banana Blanc Mange Soak a tablespoonful of gelatine for an hour in a teacupful of water. Bring a cupful and a half of milk to the boiling point, add a pinch of baking-soda, and stir in a half cupful ...
-Blanc Mange. Part 3
Strawberry Sponge Soak one-half package of gelatine in one-half cupful of cold water for two hours. Mash one quart of fine strawberries and add one-half cupful of sugar and the juice of two lemons. B...
-Blanc Mange. Part 4
Banana Charlotte In a double boiler heat a cupful of cream, to which you have added a pinch of soda. Sweeten slightly, and thicken with a heaping teaspoonful of corn-starch dissolved in a gill of col...
-Blanc Mange. Part 5
Tipsy Pudding Line a glass dish with thin slices of sponge cake. Moisten the slices with sherry or some other good wine. Put over this a layer of preserved fruit, another layer of cake and another of...
-Blanc Mange. Part 6
Raspberry Jelly Stir into a quart of red raspberries a cupful of granulated sugar. At the end of an hour run the berries through a vegetable press, and strain the juice thus produced through a flann...
-Fruit Desserts
When people call in, or upon, a doctor, in the expectation of hearing that their internal mechanism is all agley, and to pay well for the knowledge, they want something to show for what they have do...
-Fruit Desserts. Continued
Peaches Neither wash nor wipe. The soft down upon the cheek of a ripe peach is one of its charms. Keep on the ice until you are ready to serve, then pile in a fruit dish and garnish with peach leaves...
-Ice Cream And Ices
Freezers that speedily congeal the contents of their grinding depths may be bought so cheaply, our housekeeper will find that in the long run it is economy to buy a patent freezer and make her ices at...
-Ice Cream And Ices. Part 2
Chocolate Sauce For Vanilla Ice Cream Rub four heaping tablespoonfuls of sweet chocolate (grated fine) to a smooth paste, with six tablespoonfuls of cream. Add two cupfuls of boiling water, and cook ...
-Ice Cream And Ices. Part 3
Maple Frappe Into two cupfuls of maple syrup stir a cupful of water and a cupful of rich cream, and freeze. Serve in punch-glasses with teaspoons. Nesselrode Pudding Make a rich custard of eight eg...
-Ice Cream And Ices. Part 4
Peach Ice Cream (No. 2) Make a quart of rich ice cream and flavor with almond. When frozen hard take up and cut into cakes. Line the bottom and sides of the freezer with these. Reserve one-fourth for...
-Ice Cream And Ices. Part 5
Alaska Bake (No. 2) Cover thickly a two-quart brick mold of ice cream with a meringue made of the whites of six eggs and six tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar. Place the dish upon a board and set in ...
-Ice Cream And Ices. Part 6
Plum Bavarian Cream Soak half a box of gelatine in half a pint of cold water. Press through a sieve one pint of canned, or freshly stewed and sweetened plums. Stir the gelatine over boiling water unt...
-Home-Made Candies
There has of late years been so much criminal adulteration of candy that the cautious parent is tempted to condemn all bonbons as unfit for human stomachs. In our wholesale condemnation we are prone t...
-Home-Made Candies. Part 2
Penotchie Put over the fire in a saucepan three cupfuls of light brown sugar - not coffee sugar - with a cupful of milk and boil to the stage when dropped into cold water it makes a soft but firm bal...
-Home-Made Candies. Part 3
Molasses Stick Candy Boil together a pint of molasses, two tablespoonfuls of butter, a pound of brown sugar and two tablespoonfuls of vinegar. When a little hardens in iced water remove from the fire...
-Home-Made Candies. Part 4
Fondant For Cream Candies To one pound of granulated sugar put into a granite saucepan, add a gill and a half of boiling water, and stir until the sugar is dissolved - no longer. Let the syrup boil a...
-Home-Made Candies. Part 5
French Cream Almonds Four cupfuls of granulated sugar; one cupful of boiling water; two tablespoonfuls of glucose. Stir until mixed and dissolved, then cover, and boil until the syrup strings. Pour ...
-Home-Made Candies. Part 6
Creamed Grapes Make a syrup of a pound of sugar and a gill of water. Boil without stirring until a drop put into iced water becomes brittle. Remove from the fire, set in an outer pan of boiling water...
-Home-Made Candies. Part 7
Candied Pineapple Peel, slice and weigh the pineapple, and allow a pound and a half of granulated sugar to each pound of fruit. Put the fruit and sugar together in a granite kettle and add just enoug...
-Afternoon Tea
In every respectable English dwelling, be it palace or cottage, tea is served between four and five o'clock every afternoon in the year. The crone in the almshouse takes hers direct from the hob in wi...
-Afternoon Tea. Part 2
Afternoon Tea Menu. I Caviar Sandwiches Creamed Chicken Sandwiches Fancy Cakes Tea, or Coffee, or Chocolate Afternoon-Tea On The Veranda Afternoon Tea Menu. II Chicken and Celery Sandwiches Anc...
-Afternoon Tea. Part 3
Afternoon Tea Menu. III Bouillon Lobster Sandwiches Chicken Truffle Sandwiches Lettuce Sandwiches Salted Almonds Olives Bonbons Cakes Tea Coffee Chocolate, or Claret Punch When an afternoon tea g...
-Some Dainties For Afternoon Tea
Tea Cakes Sift a quart of flour three times with two teaspoonfuls of baking-powder and one of salt. Chop into this a tablespoonful of butter and one of cottolene or other fat. (In all preparations r...
-Some Dainties For Afternoon Tea. Continued
Stuffed Rolls Light rolls, shaped like finger rolls, but larger, may be cut open on one side, the crumb dug out and the cavity filled with minced and seasoned chicken, turkey, ham, or tongue. Close t...
-Frappe Beverages
A pleasant custom prevalent at many summer afternoon teas is that of passing nearly frozen beverages for the refreshment and delectation of the guests. These glaces or frappes are so easily prepared t...
-Wafers
Graham Wafers Sift three cupfuls of graham flour and one cupful of white flour with a heaping teaspoonful of salt and two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Melt two tablespoonfuls of butter with one of ...
-Stewed Fruit
Much of the excellence of stewed fruit depends upon the manner in which it is cooked. As it is served, in nine cases out of ten, it has a medicated tang that is far from agreeable - produced by the ...
-Stewed Fruit. Part 2
Stewed Peaches Peel and stone three dozen peaches. Put them over the fire with enough boiling water to cover them and put into the water six peach-pits (crushed) and two slices of pineapple cut into ...
-Stewed Fruit. Part 3
Stewed Rhubarb Carefully scrape - not peel - the stalks, cut into inch-lengths, and lay them in cold water for half an hour. Weigh the rhubarb, and to each pound of the fruit allow a half-pound of gr...
-Stewed Fruit. Part 4
Orange Marmalade Slice two dozen unpeeled oranges, and remove the seeds. Mix with them two lemons. These, as well as the oranges, must be shredded very thin. Measure the juice and add enough water to...
-Stewed Fruit. Part 5
Preserved Citron Rind Peel and cut the rind into pieces of uniform size, rejecting all the seeds. Lay the rind in salted water for two hours, then drain and lay in cold fresh water for six or seven h...
-Stewed Fruit. Part 6
Imitation East India Sweetmeats Pare and slice two dozen Bartlett pears when ripe, but not mellow. Cut into thin strips, about two inches long, and half an inch wide. Weigh the pears, and for four po...
-Stewed Fruit. Part 7
Preserved Ginger Root Peel the green ginger roots and lay in cold water for fifteen minutes, then boil, changing the water twice, until very tender. Drain the ginger and weigh it before laying it in ...
-Stewed Fruit. Part 8
Brandied Peaches Choose firm, white fruit for this purpose. Peel and weigh the peaches. To every four pounds of fruit allow three of sugar, a pint of brandy and a half-pint of water. Put the sugar an...
-Stewed Fruit. Part 9
Peach Jelly Peel, stone and quarter a peck of peaches and put over the fire with a cupful of water. A dozen cracked peach pits added to the fruit will improve the flavor of the jelly. Cook steadily u...
-Pickles
In the warm days when the thought of sweets brings no desire, but rather an aversion for them, it requires courage to put up preserves, and a certain amount of faith is necessary to make the housewi...
-Pickles. Part 2
Peter Piper's Pickled Peppers Cut a slit in the sides of large green peppers and extract the seeds. Lay in strong brine for three days and in cold water for one. Make a stuffing of eight tablespoonfu...
-Pickles. Part 3
Pickled String Beans Remove the strings and boil the beans until tender in slightly salted boiling water; put into glass jars, pour heated spiced vinegar over them and seal up tightly, as you would c...
-Pickles. Part 4
Pickled Watermelon Rind Allow three pounds of brown sugar to each quart of vinegar. Bruise four ounces of stick cinnamon and two ounces of cloves; tie in a mustard bag and boil five minutes with the ...
-Pickles. Part 5
Ripe Cucumber Pickle Select rather small ripe cucumbers of uniform size. Steam them for three hours in a closely-covered preserving kettle, lining this and covering the cucumbers with vine leaves if ...
-Sweet Pickles
In putting up sweet pickles bear in mind that the fruit of which they are made must be very thoroughly cooked. If this precaution is not taken fermentation may possibly set in and the contents of your...
-Sweet Pickles. Part 2
Pickled Plums Wipe firm plums with a damp cloth and prick each in several places to prevent bursting. Allow the same quantity of sugar, vinegar and spices to each pound of fruit as in recipe for pick...
-Sweet Pickles. Part 3
Spiced Grapes (No. 1) Stem, pulp and seed the grapes, then weigh them. To five pounds of fruit allow two and a half pounds of granulated sugar and a teacupful of vinegar. Put all over the fire with t...
-Catsups, Etcetera
Catsups and spiced sauces are now so much used that the epicure feels they are an indispensable accompaniment to his roast or broiled meat, his bit of fish, or fowl, or dish of game. They may be prepa...
-Catsups, Etcetera. Continued
Currant Catsup To four pounds of stemmed currants add two pounds of sugar, crush all together, and boil slowly until quite thick. Add one-quarter of a teaspoonful of salt, one-half pint of vinegar, o...
-The Home Brew
Tea (hot) First. Never buy poor, cheap tea. It is the dearest in the end, in every sense of the word, being unwholesome, unpalatable and wasteful. One teaspoonful of good oolong, souchong, hyson or ...
-Beverages
After-Dinner Coffee Make as directed in last recipe, allowing, however, three cupfuls of boiling water to one of freshly ground coffee, and run three times through the filter. Never pass cream with ...
-Beverages. Part 2
Lemonade, Or Plain Sherbet Roll, peel carefully and slice thin six lemons. Put into a pitcher or bowl with alternate layers of granulated sugar, two teaspoon-fuls for each lemon. Leave on the ice unt...
-Beverages. Part 3
Grape Wine (No. 2) Crush out the juice of ripe grapes, after having picked them from the stems. A large quantity could be crushed in a cider press, but when only a few are to be used they can be mash...
-Beverages. Part 4
Mead Beat to a stiff froth the whites of three eggs, and mix with six gallons of water, sixteen quarts of strained honey, and the yellow rind of two lemons, peeled very thin. Boil all together during...
-Beverages. Part 5
Blackberry Cordial (Contributed) Warm and squeeze the berries; add to one pint of juice one pint of sugar, one-half ounce of powdered cinnamon, one-fourth ounce of mace, two teaspoonfuls of cloves. ...
-Formal Breakfasts And Luncheons
The social breakfast is becoming more and more of a function. Not the early morning breakfast, where the tempers of the eaters are not always under perfect control, but a later and more leisurely meal...
-Formal Breakfasts And Luncheons. Continued
Luncheon Menu. I Oyster Cocktails Cream Of Pea Soup Salmon Cutlets Duchesse Potatoes Broiled Chicken Green Peppers Stuffed With Rice Lettuce Salad Crackers Camembert Cheese Orange Mousse Small C...
-Concerning Dinner Giving
The formal dinner is the most dignified function in the social calendar. Even a big luncheon is less stately, and, by comparison, breakfasts, afternoon teas and evening parties are mere child's play. ...
-A Little Dinner
The table should be spread with the finest and whitest of damask over the silence cloth that is now indispensable in every well-regulated household. More and more the fancy is growing to have the ce...
-After-Dinner Coffee In A Cosy Corner
Temperatures At Which Wines Should Be Served Claret should be served warm - not warmer than eighty nor colder than sixty-five degrees. Bordeaux and burgundy should be served at a temperature of abou...
-Some Studies Of Color In Family Dinners
A Green And White Dinner In the springtime you will have no difficulty in finding pale green leaves or delicate ferns with which to grace your table. Blossoms, such as the snow-drop, or the white woo...
-Menu
Bean Soup Braised Beef Boiled Potatoes - browned Baked Onions Scalloped Tomatoes Salad of Mignonette Lettuce Chocolate Pudding Coffee Graham Crackers Camembert Cheese A Yellow Dinner Cream o...
-An Evening Reception And A Chafing-Dish Supper
The old-fashioned evening party - which was by no means a dancing party, nor even a card party - has almost gone out of date. In this rushing day it seems next to impossible to pass an evening with on...
-Menu For Evening Supper. I
Bouillon Creamed or Scalloped Oysters Lobster, Shrimp, or Chicken Salad Sandwiches, or Thin Bread-and-butter Ices and Parfaits, Cakes, Coffee, Fruit Punch ...
-Menu For Evening Supper. II
Bouillon, Oyster Croquettes, Sweetbread in pates Salmon, or Chicken Salad Cold Turkey, or Chicken Mousses, Biscuits and other Ices Fancy Cakes Fruit Coffee Iced Tea Punch The table is set in the d...
-Chafing-Dish Supper
Chafing-Dish Supper. I Pigs in Blankets Chicken Bouillon Thin Bread-and-Butter Welsh Rarebit Ale or Beer Coffee Chafing-Dish Supper. II Scotch Woodcock Crackers Oysters or Clams, creamed Le...
-Familiar Talk. Common Sense And "Etiquette"
A bright young fellow told the anecdote at a dinner party. I borrow it for the occasion. A self-making man in process of manufacture, dined with a more sophisticated friend at a city restaurant. When...
-Canned Fruits
I clip from a family paper an item linking ancient and modern housewifery: It is a singular fact that we are indebted to Pompeii for the great industry of canned fruits. Years ago, when the excavati...
-Canned Fruits. Continued
Canned Apple Sauce Cut up tart apples without paring, leaving out the cores. Put over the fire with a cupful of water in the bottom of a large kettle to prevent burning, and cook soft. Rub through a ...
-Canned Vegetables
Some housewives hold that when canned vegetables may be bought for the low price at which they now stand, it is mistaken economy to attempt to put up such articles at home. But there are two sides t...
-Canned Vegetables. Continued
Canned Corn And Tomatoes Boil two dozen ears of ripe corn until the kernels are tender. Remove from the fire and, while still hot, cut the corn from the cob with a short knife. Peel two dozen ripe to...
-"Handy" Household Hints
Southern Recipe For Whitewash Boil one pound of rice in five gallons of water until soft and broken. Strain and rub the rice through a colander back into the water, and while it is still boiling stir...
-To "Tender" Tough Meat
Beefsteak Hang it as long as it can be left with safety, washing over with vinegar every day. Take it down then, wipe with a clean, dry cloth, lay upon a dish and pour over it four or five spoonfuls ...
-Some Useful Things We Throw Away
Bread Dust Two or three times a week spread the accumulated scraps upon a tin plate, or in a baking-pan, and set in a moderate oven until perfectly dry. Soft or soggy bits are good for nothing and ...
-Some Useful Things We Throw Away. Part 2
Testing A Broom When buying a broom test it by pressing the edge against the floor. If the straws bristle out and bend, the broom is a poor one. They should remain in a solid, firm mass. To Clean Br...
-Some Useful Things We Throw Away. Part 3
To Clean Battenberg Embroidery First make a suds of warm water (not hot) with a bland, white soap; wash the pieces, and if very much soiled, rub a little soap on the Battenberg on the wrong side, the...
-Some Useful Things We Throw Away. Part 4
To Draw Thread In Linen To draw thread for hem-stitching make a good lather of soap and water, and brush this over the linen where threads are to be drawn, using a shaving or other soft brush. Let it...
-Some Useful Things We Throw Away. Part 5
One Way To Remove Iron Rust One method of taking iron mold out of linen is to hold the spots over a pitcher of boiling water and rub them with the juice of sorrel and salt, and then, when the cloth i...
-Some Useful Things We Throw Away. Part 6
To Clean Russet Shoes Russet shoes may be kept clean and bright by rubbing them with a slice of banana and polishing with a cloth. To Clean Black Cloth Use warm water and alcohol in the proportion ...
-Some Useful Things We Throw Away. Part 7
A Skin Tonic A bag made of cheese-cloth, doubled and filled with bran, a teaspoonful of orris root and a half cake of Castile soap, chopped fine, makes an excellent skin tonic for the bath. After usi...
-Some Useful Things We Throw Away. Part 8
How To Clean A Straw Hat Go all over it with damp corn-meal, rubbing it in well. Next apply dry meal, work thoroughly into the straw and leave it on for some hours. Brush out the meal and wash freely...
-Some Useful Things We Throw Away. Part 9
To Take Out Machine Grease Cold water, ammonia and soap will take out machine grease where other things would fail on account of making the colors run. What To Do Till The Doctor Comes Croup: Hot f...
-How To Build A Fire
Before attempting to use a range (or stove) one should know something about its construction, and the appliances that are afforded for its regulation. An ordinary cooking range is supplied with damper...
-Final Familiar Talk. Emergencies, Broken China, And "In Case Of"
A ready command of expedients is the hall-mark of the canny housekeeper. The ability to snatch safety from apparent ruin, like a brand from the burning, is a faculty with some. It may be acquired by m...
-Emergencies, Broken China, And "In Case Of". Continued
The Dismay Of The Housewife Over The Destruction Of Her Brittle treasures dates far back of the poetical precision who makes her ability to be mistress of herself though china fall, the test of bre...
-Some Culinary Terms
Aspic Meat jelly. Au Gratin Dishes covered with crumbs and browned. Au Naturel Plain, simple. Potatoes cooked in their jackets are au naturel. Barbecue To roast any animal whole, usually in t...
-Weights And Measures
It is so much easier to measure ingredients than to weigh them that the housewife saves time and work by acquainting herself with certain equivalent measures and weights. Without burdening her memory ...
-Time-Table Baking And Roasting Fish And Meats
Baked beans with pork......................... 6 to 8 hours. Beef, fillet, rare........................................................ 20 to 30 minutes. Beef ribs or...
-Boiling Meats Time-Table
Chicken....................................... 1 to 1 1-2 hours. Corned beef (rib or flank).............................. 4 to 6 hours, according to size. Corned beaf...
-Boiling Fish Time-Table
Clams and oysters......................... 3 to 5 minutes. Codfish and haddock, per pound....... 10 minutes. Bass and bluefish, per pound.......... 10 minutes. ...
-Broiling Time-Table
Bacon................................... .4 to 8 minutes. Lamb, or mutton chops............................. 8 to 10 minutes. Liver.......................... 4 t...
-Frying Time-Table
Bacon fried in its own fat............ 2 to 3 minutes. Chops, breaded...................... 8 to 10 minutes. Doughnuts and fritters............... 3 to 5 minutes...
-Boiling Vegetables Time-Table
Asparagus.......................................................... 20 to 25 minutes. Beans, string.................................................... 1 to 2 hours. ...
-Steaming Time-Table
Brown bread............................. 3 hours. Puddings, one quart or more....................... 2 to 3 hours. Rice......................... 45 to 60 minutes...







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