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Every Day Meals | by Mary Hooper



Being economic and wholesome recipes for breakfast, luncheon, and supper

TitleEvery Day Meals
AuthorMary Hooper
PublisherHenry S. King & Co.
Year1877
Copyright1877, Henry S. King & Co.
AmazonLarousse Gastronomique

By Mary Hooper, Author Of "Little Dinners." "Cookery For Invalids," "Little Dinners: How To Serve Them With Elegance And Economy", Etc., Professor Of domestic economy, crystal palace school of art, etc., etc.

-Preface
The gratifying reception which has been accorded to my books on cookery, and especially to Little Dinners, has induced me to prepare another handbook, embracing a large number of original recipes wh...
-Hints On Economical Cookery, Etc., Etc
It has been so often repeated that the English cook is not only the worst but the most wasteful in the world, that the fact has come to be accepted as a sad and certain truth for which there is no rem...
-Hints On Economical Cookery. Part 2
How was it, cook, we had no gravy with the beef yesterday? inquires the lady of the house. Why, ma'am, you said you would not allow gravy meat; and, of course, I couldn't make it out of nothing!...
-Hints On Economical Cookery. Part 3
The addition of half a tin of preserved lobster to three pints of this soup will convert it into one of the first class. If curry is liked, a pinch of the powder may be stirred in with the thickening....
-Hints On Economical Cookery. Part 4
It is very necessary to be a good judge of fish, and as freshness is the most essential point, the observation must first be directed to it. Fish may be kept on ice for a considerable time and still b...
-Hints On Economical Cookery. Part 5
At this time, when so much anxiety is felt on the subject of our milk supply, it is well to consider what may be done, at least to render milk harmless. In the milk, as in almost every other provision...
-Breakfast: Kidneys Sautes. Rolled Mackerel. Boiled Bacon
Kidneys Sautes Like many other articles of diet, kidneys within the last ten years have been doubled in price, and are so scarce as to be regarded as luxuries. The method of cooking them generally ...
-Breakfast: Broiled Chicken. Mutton Pies. Boiled Eggs
Broiled Chicken For this purpose a chicken should be small and young, if otherwise it must be parboiled before broiling. Split the chicken in half and brush over with dissolved butter, and during t...
-Breakfast: Spiced Beef. Potato Chips. Eggs Aubernais
Spiced Beef For ten pounds of meat make the following pickle: - One pound of common salt, two ounces saltpetre, one ounce of cloves, half-an-ounce of allspice, half-a-pound of coarse sugar. Let all...
-Breakfast: Meat Cakes A L'Italienne. Rolled Tongue. Marrow Toast
Meat Cakes A L'Italienne Mince very fine any kind of cold meat or chicken, taking care to have it free from skin and gristle, add to it a quarter of its weight of sifted bread crumbs, a few drops o...
-Breakfast: Roulades Of Mutton. Brawn. Soused Herrings
Roulades Of Mutton Remove the fillet from a fine loin of mutton, trim away every particle of skin, fat, and gristle. Flatten the fillet with a cutlet bat, and cut it lengthways into slices as thin ...
-Breakfast: Raised Pork Pie. Baked Soles. Omelette Aux Fines Herbes
Raised Pork Pie Take a pound of meat, fat and lean, from the chump end of a fine fore loin of pork, and cut it into neat dice, mix a tablespoonful of water with it, and season with a large teaspoon...
-Breakfast: Broiled Mackerel. Savoury Eggs. Potted Beef
Broiled Mackerel When the fish are split open wipe them carefully with a dry cloth, sprinkle them lightly with pepper and salt, and hang them up in a cool place with plenty of air until the next mo...
-Breakfast: Broiled Or Devilled Chicken Legs. Eggs Sur Le Plat. Sheeps' Tongues
Broiled Or Devilled Chicken Legs For this dish use the legs of either roasted or boiled chicken. Take the skin off the legs, with a sharp knife, score the flesh on both sides of the bone. Mix a sma...
-Breakfast: Fondu. Broiled Bacon. Potted Salmon
Fondu Soak the crumbs of a French roll or about the same quantity of other light bread in a quarter of a pint of boiling milk, beat it up smooth and add to it two ounces of any cold meat minced ver...
-Breakfast: Broiled Kidneys. Egg Cutlets. Pigs' Feet A La St. Menehould
Broiled Kidneys These are quite an epicure's dish, and care must be taken to cook them slowly. Having skinned the kidneys (they must not be split or cut) dip them for a moment in boiling fat, place...
-Breakfast: Mutton Collops. Potato Snow. Fried Mushrooms
Mutton Collops Cut neat thin slices from a leg of either roasted or boiled mutton, dip them in yolk of egg, and in fine dry bread-crumbs, to which a little flour, pepper, and salt has been added. B...
-Breakfast: Pressed Ox Cheek. Bloaters. Scalloped Eggs
Pressed Ox Cheek The whole or a portion of an ox cheek can be used for this purpose, as may be convenient. Thoroughly cleanse the cheek, boil it for ten minutes in water, with a little salt, which ...
-Tea
There are few housewives who will admit that they require directions for making tea, and it is indeed surprising that the few simple rules for ensuring a good cup of it are so frequently ignored or ne...
-Coffee
The method of making coffee is almost as simple as that of making tea, yet, from neglect of the most ordinary precautions, and the habit of hurrying the operation, failure in it is rather the rule tha...
-Cocoa
The best and most digestible beverage is undoubtedly that made from the nibs. These should not be too highly roasted, and it is a good plan to grind or crush them before boiling. A large pot should be...
-Chocolate
The quantity of chocolate to be used must depend on the desired thickness and the quality of the material. The chocolate of the Compagnie Coloniale maintains its superiority, and two recipes for its u...
-Lunch: Roasted Leg Of Mutton. Yorkshire Pudding. Browned Potatoes. Rice Pudding
Roasted Leg Of Mutton A great French writer on culinary matters has said that to roast well a cook must be born with a talent for roasting. Whether this be true or not, it is certain that a cook wh...
-Lunch: Spring Soup. Pie Of Stewed Shin Of Beef. Cocoa Pudding
Spring Soup Cut up two pounds of the scrag end of a neck of veal, put it on to boil in two quarts of cold water, with two teaspoonfuls of salt. As soon as the water boils carefully skim the pot, an...
-Lunch: Herrings With Mustard Sauce. Boiled Leg Of Mutton. Semolina Bottasso Pudding
Herrings With Mustard Sauce Put a tablespoonful of the finest salad oil into a dish, pass the herrings through it on both sides. The fish must not be opened, and, with a little care, can easily be ...
-Lunch: Milk Soup. Rump Steak. Haricot Beans. Pancakes
Milk Soup Boil four onions, two turnips, and a piece of celery, all minced in a quart of water with a teaspoonful of salt and a large pinch of white pepper until tender, then rub them through a sie...
-Lunch: Semolina Soup. Irish Stew. Jam Pudding
Semolina Soup Use semolina Bottasso. Boil a quarter of a pound in a quart of water for twenty minutes. When done, add the semolina and the water in which it has boiled to a quart of stock rich-fl...
-Lunch: Stewed Beef Steak. Suet Dumplings. Boiled Potatoes. Bread Pudding
Stewed Beef Steak Beef steak stewed according to this recipe is useful when there is not time to prepare a thick slice in one piece, nevertheless, to have it tender and in perfection, an hour and a...
-Lunch: Bread Soup. Liver And Bacon. Treacle Pudding
Bread Soup Boil four minced onions, two turnips, and a small stick of celery, also minced, in a quart of water with a tablespoonful of salt. When the vegetables are tender add another quart of wate...
-Lunch: Mutton Broth. Roast Pork. Apple Sauce. Warwickshire Pudding
Mutton Broth Wash and break up into very small pieces two pounds of the scrag end of a neck of mutton, put it on to boil in a gallon of water with a tablespoonful of salt. As soon as it boils take ...
-Lunch: Sheep's Head Soup. Rissolettes. Beatrice Pudding
Sheep's Head Soup This recipe is cheap and good, and is especially suitable for the family table and for the poor. If a sheep's head is bought without tongue or brains the cost of the soup will ...
-Lunch: Cabbage Soup. Mutton Pasty. Italian Macaroni. Plain Apple Charlotte
Cabbage Soup Wash and trim a fine young cabbage with a good white heart, cut the leaves into fine shreds, and boil them until tender in a quart of water. Add the cabbage and the water in which it w...
-Lunch: Mashed Parsnips. Fried Bread. Stewed Ox Heart. Batter Pudding
Mashed Parsnips Wash and scrape a large parsnip, cut it into eight lengths, and having divided them in half, put them into a quart of boiling water with a teaspoonful of salt, and an ounce of good ...
-Lunch: Pea Or Lentil Soup. Fish Pie. Boiled Oatmeal Pudding
Pea Or Lentil Soup Dried peas contain a high degree of nourishment, and deserve to be more generally in favour than they are. Lentils, which are a foreign variety of pea, are even more nutritiou...
-Fish
On Frying Fish Perhaps there is nothing in the whole range of cookery which will so test the powers of a cook as a plainly fried sole or whiting. Yet there is nothing difficult in the operation if ...
-How To Cook Sole Fish
Fried Sole Soles weighing from three-quarters of a pound to a pound are the most suitable size for frying whole. If it is desired to have the fish juicy and with their full flavour, do not have the...
-How To Cook Sole Fish. Continued
Fillets Of Sole Fried These may either be rolled in one piece, or divided into several, as in the foregoing recipe. In either case egg and crumb them thoroughly, place them in the wire basket as yo...
-How To Cook Salmon
Boiled Salmon The principles which govern the cooking of meat when immersed in liquid should be applied to large fish, - it should boil for just time enough to harden the outer edges and thus preve...
-Mayonnaise Of Salmon
For a handsome dish, about six pounds of the middle cut of a fine salmon will be required. When, however, appearance is not an object, a less expensive piece answers well, and the whole of a moderate-...
-Salmon Salad
Cook some pieces of salmon as directed for salmon steaks, when done take them out of the butter and put them on a dish with a little French vinegar, pepper, and salt. When they have lain for an hour -...
-How To Cook Cod Fish
Fried Cod Fish Get slices of cod about half an inch thick, sprinkle with pepper and salt, and if convenient let them lie for an hour or two. Then dip them in yolk of egg and sifted bread crumbs sea...
-How To Cook Haddock
How To Cook Haddock The manner in which haddock is usually boiled has made this method of cooking it unpopular. It generally comes to table with great gashes in the side, denoting the furious rate ...
-How To Cook Herrings
Kippered Herrings Put the herrings into a basin, pour over enough boiling water to cover them, take them out immediately, and put them skin downwards in a frying-pan. For two herrings put half an o...
-Cheap Fish Pies
For a pie of fresh fish, haddock, or mackerel, boil the fish the usual time in water with salt, pepper, and a little vinegar, pick the fish from the bones, and make the pie in the same manner as with ...
-Oyster Trifles
The first thing to do will be to make the paper cases for the trifles. They can be bought at the stationer's at nine-pence the dozen, but can be made at home for a penny. The cases for savoury trif...
-How To Cook Lobster
Lobster Cutlets These may be economically made with preserved lobster. Small claws of fresh lobsters, which are used by way of ornament, can always be had at trifling cost of the fishmonger; but, i...
-How To Cook Beef
Grenadines Of Beef Cut two pounds of the undercut of either the sirloin or the rump of beef into neat cutlets, about the third of an inch thick. Lard them with thin strips of bacon, and put them in...
-How To Cook Tripe
Tripe In Batter Boil the tripe after prepared in the shops for two hours. To each pound put a quart of cold water, two teaspoon-fuls of salt, a small teaspoonful of pepper, a bay-leaf, a very small...
-Meat Puddings
A well-made meat pudding is not only an economical but a generally acceptable dish. The material most in use is rump steak, with the addition of kidneys or mushrooms. Excellent meat pudding may be mad...
-Rechauffes
To use the crust remaining from steak pudding: Chop finely the remainder of the pudding crust, add a little flour, and mix into a paste with egg; flour your hands, and roll the paste into small balls ...
-Little Dishes
Cow Heel Stew the heel gently after it comes from the shop as cooked, for four hours, with four onions, a bay-leaf, two cloves, and sufficient pepper and salt to season the water highly. When done ...
-Meat Minced
Any kind of cold meat, game, or poultry, can be advantageously made into a mince, and by the exercise of a little skill and taste, a dish which is too often insipid, may be rendered delicious. Firs...
-Shoulder Of Mutton Boned And Stuffed
There is no difficulty for a cook in removing the bones of a shoulder of mutton or lamb, and a little practice will enable her to accomplish it with dexterity. It is, however, generally possible to ha...
-How To Cook Mutton
Neck Of Mutton Cutlets This excellent dish will serve either as an entree or a supper dish. It will be less expensive if the whole neck is purchased, and the scrag end served boiled or stewed. The ...
-How To Cook Lamb
Shoulder Of Lamb Stuffed This is a useful cold dish. Take out the blade-bone of the shoulder, leaving that of the knuckle. Make a stuffing of a quarter of a pound of fat pork, or of the back fat of...
-How To Cook Veal
Veal A La Casserole For this dish a piece of the fillet about three inches thick will be required, and weighing from two to three pounds. It should be cut from one side of the leg, without bone; bu...
-Roast Chickens With Water-Cress
The fashion of serving bread sauce with roasted poultry or game is unknown on the continent, and the French are especially intolerant of our panade as they term bread sauce. En revanche, the English...
-Fowl A La Soubise
Prepare a fine fowl as for boiling, fill up the body with small onions which have been parboiled in milk with a little salt. Make a stock, in which to boil the fowl, of the giblets, two or three bones...
-How To Cook Chicken
Fried Chicken Prepare it as for boiling. Put two ounces of butter into a stewpan, and when it boils put in the chicken, let it fry until a delicate brown, then sprinkle it with pepper and salt, put...
-How To Cook Poultry
Fillets Of Turkey Cut the meat from the bones of dressed turkey legs, cutlet-wise, in slices about an inch thick. Work into a paste a teaspoonful of chutney, two of dissolved butter, one of anchovy...
-How To Cook Rabbit
Fried Rabbit Choose a young one, cut it into small joints, and fry slowly in butter till a nice brown. When done pour over it the following sauce :- Dissolve a little butter in a saucepan, add pepp...
-How To Cook Sweetbreads
Lamb's Sweetbreads These make an admirable breakfast dish, and can be partly prepared over-night. Trim and wash the sweetbreads, put them into a saucepan with sufficient well-flavoured stock to cov...
-How To Cook Kidneys
Kidneys A La Brochette Split the kidneys in half, and again in quarters, skin them, dip each piece in dissolved butter, and sprinkle them with pepper and salt. Cut some slices of streaked bacon, ra...
-How To Cook Mushrooms
Puree Of Mushrooms. To Serve With Broiled Chicken, Cutlets, Etc Chop up a pound of fresh champignons, simmer them in a little milk or broth for ten minutes, then add the crumb of a French roll; sti...
-Sausages
Perhaps there is no article of diet more universally popular than the sausage, and it is one of great antiquity. In the Forme of Cury, a cookery book compiled by the cooks of Richard the Second, we ...
-Sausages. Continued
Pork Sausages When a pig is cut up in the country, sausages are usually made of the trimmings, but when the meat has to be bought the chump end of a fore loin or blade bone will be found to answer ...
-Meat Pies
Bath Polonies Mince pork as for sausages, season it with coriander, allspice, long pepper, pepper and salt. Bullock's skins must be used, and must not be filled too tightly. Put the polonies into w...
-Meat Pies. Continued
Rabbit Pie If the rabbit is young and tender, three-quarters of an hour will be sufficient time to boil it, as for chicken pie. Proceed exactly as directed for chicken pie, adding the rabbit's live...
-Pate De Foies Gras
In towns it is generally possible to bespeak from the poulterers sufficient fat livers at a moderate cost. Six fine livers will make a good-sized pie. Make a crust of a pound of flour and four ounces ...
-How To Cook Galantine
Salt the rind of a loin of pork for a few days. It must not have on it more than a quarter of an inch of fat. When required for use soak it to make it roll well, lay it flat, and place on it a layer o...
-How To Cook Brawn
Mock Brawn Get a fine sheep's head, thoroughly clean it and boil it for five minutes in salt and water. Then put it into fresh water with a pound of pickled pork, and boil both until thoroughly don...
-How To Cook Croquettes
Croquettes Croquettes of all kinds, fish, game, poultry, or any delicate meat can be successfully made on the following model. Whatever material is used must be finely minced or pounded. Care is re...
-Kromeskies
Kromeskies may be made of any kind of cooked fish, lobster, or oysters, of game, poultry, or veal. Oyster kromeskies are much esteemed, and if made by the following recipe are not extravagant. The qua...
-Curries
These are made in great variety, and by many different recipes. Perhaps there is no dish which in England it is so difficult to make suitable to the taste of Anglo-Indians. The fresh fruits, the grate...
-Vol Au Vent
For the case prepare fine puff-pastry (as at p. 215). Cut out rounds, or shapes, with cutters made for the purpose. If a high case be desired there should be at least four layers of pastry a quarter o...
-How To Make Rolls
Sausage Roll Roll out a square of fine puff-paste to about four inches. Put on one half of it a piece of sausage-meat rolled like a cork, and fold over the other half, joining the paste neatly at t...
-How To Cook Eggs
Eggs And Bacon A very relishing breakfast dish may be made by breaking eggs into a dish and toasting over it slices of streaked bacon, as fat as possible, allowing all the drippings to fall on the ...
-How To Make Porridges
Oatmeal Porridge Boil a quart of water, drop in with one hand, by degrees, stirring with a wooden spoon in. the other, two ounces of oatmeal and a teaspoonful of salt. Let the porridge boil for hal...
-How To Cook Macaroni
Macaroni Au Parmesan Throw a quarter of a pound of macaroni broken into pieces an inch long into three pints of boiling water with a large pinch of salt. The saucepan should be large or the water w...
-How To Make Stuffing
The two stuffings, or, as they are sometimes called, seasonings, in general use in England, are that which is used for veal, and, with certain modifications, for fish, poultry, game, and meat; and s...
-How To Cook Spinach
Spinach as generally cooked by boiling in water is deprived of its flavour and fine dietetic qualities. There is no difficulty in cooking spinach according to this recipe, but care must be taken not t...
-How To Cook Vegetables
Spanish Onions Boil the onions whole for half an hour in water with plenty of salt. Drain, and return them to the stewpan with a small piece of butter or dripping and a little pepper and salt; cove...
-How To Make Cheese Dishes
Boiled Cheese Put four tablespoonfuls of beer into a small saucepan, shred into it a quarter of a pound of good new cheese, and stir briskly over the fire until all is dissolved and it is on the po...
-Mint Sauce
We all know badly made mint sauce, which has a heavy deposit of coarse sugar, and requires to be stirred when served to each person. If made as follows, the flavour will be very fine, and the sugar wi...
-Forcemeat Balls
Soak the crumb of half a French roll in milk, squeeze it as dry as possible, put it into a stewpan with a piece of butter the size of a walnut, and work it over the fire until it becomes a stiff paste...
-Polenta
Put one pint of water in a stewpan, when it boils add a little salt, and stir in with a stick sufficient coarse yellow maize flour to make it very thick, continue stirring till the mixture is well coo...
-How To Make Sandwiches
Sandwiches A La Chateaubriand Have rolls made to order as, for dinner, of the size usually sold at three a penny, let them be nicely rasped. 'The bread should be of the finest and whitest quality, ...
-Apple Tart
Divide the apples in quarters, take out the core, and pare them. Observe that apples are more quickly pared when cut in quarters than when whole. If the apples are of a moderate size, leave them in qu...
-Puff Pastry
This recipe for puff pastry is not generally in use in private houses, but will be found to be simple and to take far less time and labour in rolling out than the old method. It is requisite to have t...
-How To Make Dumplings
Apple Turnovers Make a paste of lard or dripping in the same manner as puff pastry, using four ounces of the fat to eight of flour and a gill of water. Roll the paste out a quarter-of-an-inch thick...
-How To Make Cheesecakes
Line patty-pans with puff or short crust, fill them with any of the following pastes, and bake. To prepare curd for Yorkshire Cheesecakes, boil two quarts of milk, and as it rises pour in either half-...
-How To Make Omelettes
Omelette Au Confiture Break three eggs into a basin, beat them with a small pinch of salt, a teaspoonful of sifted sugar, three tablespoonfuls of milk, and a few drops of extract of vanilla, for fo...
-Souffle Pudding
This is a delicious pudding, and to insure its success great care and exactness are required. In the first place, to avoid failure, it is necessary that the butter, flour, sugar, and milk should be st...
-Puddings
Swiss Pudding Mix a tablespoonful of corn-flour smooth in a gill of cold milk, boil half a pint of milk and stir both together over the fire until thick. Beat up two eggs, stir them into the corn-f...
-Pastry
Italian Fritters Cut slices of very light bread half an inch thick, with a round paste cutter divide them into neat shapes all alike in size. Throw them into boiling fat and fry quickly of a rich g...
-How To Make Compotes
Compote Of Fruits Boil a quarter of a pound of rice quite soft; break it up into a paste, press it into a round mould about four inches in diameter, and to the thickness of two inches. When cold, t...
-Jellies
Very few cooks in these days make the gelatine for jellies of calves' feet, the process being both tedious and expensive. French leaf gelatine has of late been used, and is excellent; but the difficul...
-Creams and Custards
Custard The great art of making a custard well lies in the stirring, and when this is properly managed, a custard made with milk and the quantity of eggs given in this recipe, will be as rich as on...
-Meringues
Whip the whites of six eggs very firm, mix with them three quarters of a pound of the finest icing sugar. As quickly as possible fill a tablespoon with the mixture, and put it on a strip of paper plac...
-How To Make Ices
The making of ices, like many other operations of the confectioner's art, is often rendered difficult by the neglect of the simple principles and precautions which, duly considered, ensure success. Th...
-How To Make Ice Cream
Ice Creams The base of all first-class ice creams is as follows: - In two quarts of good cream dissolve one pound of loaf sugar, flavour as desired, and freeze as before directed. The product, when...
-How To Make Ice Water
Water Ices Boil three pounds of fine white sugar in two quarts of water to a syrup, add one quart of the juice of any of the above fruits. With strawberry and orange water ices use the juice of a l...
-Bread Making
Our daily bread is so common a thing that we accept it with almost as little inquiry as thankfulness. Some indeed have not time to consider how important it is that bread, the staff of life, should ...
-Household Bread
The flour called seconds makes a more economical oaf for family use than the first quality; when, however, a very white, light kind of bread is preferred, best whites must be used. German yeast...
-Unfermented Bread
This may readily be made, either with Limmer's self-raising flour, or with baking powder. Bread thus made is not only perfectly wholesome, but by many persons found more digestible than when fermented...
-Madeira Cakes
Beat three eggs for two minutes, add the grated rind of a small lemon, then pour on to them six ounces of lump sugar dissolved in a stewpan with half-a-gill of water. This syrup should be added to the...
-Buns
Put a pound of flour into a deep bowl and mix with it an ounce of German yeast dissolved in a pint of lukewarm milk; let it stand in a warm place to rise. In half an hour knead in another pound of flo...
-How To Make Tea-Cakes With Baking-Powder
Mix three teaspoonfuls of powder with a pound of flour and two ounces of powdered loaf sugar. Rub in two ounces of butter, and when ready to bake, make into dough with half-a-pint of skim milk with on...
-How To Make Tea-Cakes With Baking-Powder. Part 2
Crisp Oatmeal Cakes Rub half-a-pound of dripping or lard into half-a-pound of oatmeal into which you have mixed a large pinch of carbonate of soda and of salt. Make into a dough with a gill of cold...
-How To Make Tea-Cakes With Baking-Powder. Part 3
Savoy Sponge Cake Beat half-a-pound of finely-sifted sugar with the yolks of four eggs until you have a thick batter, then stir in lightly six ounces of fine dry and sifted flour, then the whites o...
-How To Make Tea-Cakes With Baking-Powder. Part 4
Macaroons Blanch forty sweet and twenty bitter almonds. Pound them in a mortar, adding half a pound of the finest sifted loaf sugar as you go on, taking care the almonds are reduced to a smooth pas...
-How To Make Tea-Cakes With Baking-Powder. Part 5
Plain Biscuits Break lightly half a pound of fresh butter into two pounds of flour, add a salt-spoonful of salt and work into a stiff paste with half a pint of skim milk or cold water. Knead this w...
-How To Make Cake Icing
How To Ice Cakes Beat up the white of two large eggs with the juice of half a lemon, weigh a pound of the finest sifted sugar, sold at the grocer's under the name of icing or confectioner's sug...
-Orange Marmalade
A great fault of home-made marmalade is that the peel is generally hard. This defect is easily remedied by boiling the peel thoroughly before slicing. From three to four hours will be required, and it...
-Mushroom Ketchup
The larger and fresher mushrooms are for making ketchup the better. Break them well up, and to each seven pounds use half a pound of salt, mixing well together. Let the mushrooms stand until the next ...
-How To Make Preserves
French Preserves The ordinary method of making jam in England has the merit of being rapid and tolerably certain; that, however, in use in France is far better for the small fruits, as it preserves...
-How To Make Preserves. Part 2
Seville Orange Jelly Lay the peel of six Seville oranges - it must be shred very fine - in a quart of water for twenty-four hours; strain out the peel, and boil the water with three pounds of sugar...
-How To Make Preserves. Part 3
How To Preserve Eggs To Keep For Twelve Months Put two lumps of unslacked lime, about the size of your hand, into an earthenware pan. Pour on by degrees two gallons of boiling water. Soon after you...
-Useful Recipes
How To Ripen And Keep A Stilton Cheese If the family is small it is best to divide the cheese and use half at a time. Butter a paper and tie over the top of the cheese; mix equal quantities of ordi...
-How To Make Wine
Raisin Wine Good raisin wine cannot be made cheaply, and it is somewhat troublesome to make, as it must be run off into a fresh cask after it has stood six months, in order to fine it, - indeed, it...
-How To Make Wine. Continued
Ginger Wine To every gallon of water allow three pounds and a half of loaf sugar, two ounces of ginger, the juice and peel of three lemons, and one orange. Peel the orange and lemons very thin, pou...
-How to Make Cups
Claret Cup Cut three thick slices of cucumber into a bottle of claret poured into a large jug, add a sprig of balm and of borage, a pint bottle of Seltzer water, one to two ounces of sifted sugar o...
-Ginger Drinks
Ginger Beer Crush two ounces of ginger, peel two lemons very thinly and squeeze the juice, put into a pan with one pound and a half of loaf sugar, and two ounces of cream of tartar. Pour on to this...







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