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The Steward's Handbook And Guide To Party Catering | by Jessup Whitehead



In the preparation of this volume my aim has been to supply just such a book as I wished for myself when I was a beginner in hotel employment and saw how much there was before me to learn before I could reach the paying positions. It has fallen to my lot to be the first to write down what have hitherto been the unwritten rules of hotel management; as the hotel system of this country is advancing and expanding, I have looked upwards and not downwards for my examples; and I beg the reader, who may find some things contrary to his preconceived notions of hotel interiors, to note that I have not made the mistake of imagining that I had to invent a code or system, but have only had to state the facts as they exist already; the expressions of opinion or advocacy of special rules are but the links to make the whole plan coherent, where otherwise it would be broken by the difference in practice of different hotel-keepers...

TitleThe Steward's Handbook And Guide To Party Catering
AuthorJessup Whitehead
PublisherJessup Whitehead & Co.
Year1903
Copyright1889, Jessup Whitehead
AmazonLarousse Gastronomique
The Steward's Handbook And Guide To Party Catering.

In Five Parts.

Part 1. - Hotel Stewarding And Composition of Bills of Fare.

Part 2. - Restaurant Stewarding and Public Party Catering.

Part 3. - Catering For Private Parties, and Head Waiters and their Troops.

Part 4. - A Dictionary Of Dishes and Culinary Terms and Specialties.

Part 5. - How To Fold Napkins.

Sixth Edition..

-Preface
In the preparation of this volume my aim has been to supply just such a book as I wished for myself when I was a beginner in hotel employment and saw how much there was before me to learn before I cou...
-Part First. Hotel Stewarding
Showing The Internal Workings Of The American System Of Hotel Keeping. The Steward's Duties In Detail And In Relation To Other Heads Of Departments. Steward's Storekeeping, Steward's Bookkeeping, And ...
-A New Class Of Stewards
If there is to be a new beginning, if the steward is to catch up with hie proper place In the line of hotel improvement so that he will be found where he ought to be in every hotel, and if it is becom...
-Stewards Of Other Days
Those old-time Mississippi steamboat stewards were fine models of executive ability; they were remarkable men in their way, and are worth a passing description, for we shall never see their like again...
-"The Evil Which Men Do Lives After Them"
These men, these old-time river stewards, are largely to blame for the fact that there are so few stewards now in the hotels. Their standard of morals was generally very low; they were sharps, they we...
-The Pernicious Commission System
The very fact that these old-school stew-ards and the young fledglings who think they are learning the steward's duties from them, relate these money-making experiences with so much gusto, and, indeed...
-Something Less Manly
While these old-time stewards took such extreme pleasure in talking over the delights of commissions and per cents, there was another source of profit worked by some of them that was never spoken of. ...
-A Specimen Letter
The mixedne88 of the ideas of a steward's duties contained in the following letter is easily accounted for when the fact is taken into consideration that there are two different types of stewards now ...
-The Steward The Superior Officer
The first proposition is only partly right, the steward hires the chef or head cook but not the kitchen help under him; the steward hires the headwaiter but not the waiters under him; the steward hire...
-The Steward Deals Only With The Head Men
But the head cook has his own favorite second who goes with him year after year, and frequently his roast cook and broiler and several others whom the steward never exercises his authority over, excep...
-The Steward As Buyer
The next proposition does not admit of a straightforward answer. It is: The steward does all the buying of supplies for the table and all kitchen utensils. Undoubtedly the coming steward will; he is...
-The Steward Puts In His Fancy Work
Next, our correspondent evidently does not say what he means, his question is indirect, he says: The pastry cook or confectioner makes all ices and creams, he probably means it is not the steward's ...
-All Stewards Carve
The next proposition: The steward does no carving, as that is done by the cook or his assistants, is quite wrong. The only point that all sorts of stewards are agreed upon is that it is the steward'...
-Assistant Carvers
The steward, being the chief carver, does not necessarily do all; in a large hotel there is a row of carvers, from three to six, or more, all at work at once, and there can be no rule about these assi...
-The Steward And The Bill Of Fare
Then, says our correspondent: The steward gets up all the bills of fare. The coming steward will, but he will be a true maitre d'hotel, he will be a scholar, a man of taste and grammar, he will k...
-The Steward Who Does Not Know
On the other hand the cooks would have good cause for complaint against any steward, inexperienced in culinary affairs, who should try to get up the bill of fare. There is a character in Shakespeare's...
-The Steward Is The Overseer First And Last
The next proposition of our correspondent does not admit of a straight yes or no, either. It is: It is not the steward's duty or his assistants', to carry from the carving room and care for the meats...
-The Steward As A Worker
Next: The steward does no manual labor, but is the head and director of all matters pertaining to kitchen and dining room. In reality the hotel steward who does his full duty is the most hard-wor...
-The Steward Manages The Meats
Perhaps the remaining proposition discloses what our correspondent was really driving at in asking the manual labor question, he says: The steward's assistant prepares all meats for cooking, but not ...
-Stewards Needed Everywhere
These replies cover all the points raised by our correspondent except the statement that there are some hotels too small to employ a steward. Strictly speaking there are no such hotels. In every hotel...
-The Steward And The Landlady
The recipe for getting along amicably with the proprietor's wife has hitherto been kept a profound secret; it is now divulged and is alone worth the price of this book. It is this: Make yourself thoro...
-The Steward And The Housekeeper
The modern hotel is so far different from the ship and steamer that the steward docs not hire or discharge the housekeeper here as he does the stewardess there. There are a few exceptions among the la...
-The Steward And The Headwaiter
Well, thank God that's over, exclaimed a headwaiter as he closed the dining-room doors after breakfast, oh, but they scorched me, they burnt me up! There is no steward out there. I can't get anythi...
-The Steward And His Adversaries
The headwaiter in some hotels is a veritable Warwick the king-maker, he can oust the steward frequently, and cause a change of chef every month. This is oft-enest the case in what are called family ho...
-The Steward And The Storekeeper
Under the modern hotel system the steward does not hire or discharge the storekeeper. The storekeeper is a clerk, he represents the proprietor in the storeroom, he is employed or dismissed from servic...
-The Steward And His Storeroom
The steward is proud of his well-stocked storeroom and spends whatever leisure time he may have in it In one sort of storeroom, now found in modern-built hotels, the steward spends most of his time wh...
-The Steward And The Care Of Meats
Take care of the meat, all the rest will take care of itself. It seems most shocking to people in general to waste bread because such has been the teaching of their childhood, but where abundance of o...
-The Steward And His Management Of Help
A new steward cannot get along with old help. Such is the rule. The old hands all think they know more than he possibly can know, they do not want to do new ways, they feel disposed to tell him, he be...
-The Steward And The Hands' Pay Day
All rules are off where there is no regular pay day. The hotel that is in debt to the help is in a bad way; they break away from the restraints of dicipline, work but to suit themselves and always hav...
-The Steward And The Clerks
The steward, having to count the cost of meals, cannot make up his estimates, nor complete his accounts, without a daily house count from the office made up as is fully detailed in this book in anothe...
-The Steward And The Proprietor
And what shall I be doing all this time! some proprietor will ask, who has read thus far. Well, there was once a very handsome and popular hotel proprietor, whom the writer knew, sitting on the piaz...
-The Inside Steward's Special Duties
Where there is too much work for one steward two are employed. The purchasing steward not having time to remain in the kitchen and carving room during the two or three hours of each meal the inside st...
-The Wine-Room Steward's Special Duties
Wine stewards are employed in hotels where a large bar and banquet business is done. It is the duty of this steward to have his store-room open, very much like the kitchen store-room, during meal time...
-The Steward And The Dairy
The steward having in charge the furnishing of the table is responsible for the quality of the milk and for the furnishing of cream for the coffee, oatmeal and berries, etc., holding somebody else res...
-The Steward And The Dish-Room
The steward is directly responsible (holding somebody else responsible to himself) for the appearance of the crockery and glassware as it goes to table. The dishes, cups and saucers and all the rest m...
-The Steward And His Workshops
The basement story of some large hotels resembles a small factory where each tradesman is doing his part towards the completion of some Immense work, and a great number of trades it takes to keep up a...
-When The Steward's Good Time Comes
Compare the actual duties of the thorough hotel steward, as they have been detailed, with the ideas of those who think they will, as stewards only have to go to market, buy something and make their ow...
-Who Shall Be Stewards?
Every hotel being in want of a real steward, and only a small number being at present supplied with such, it is evident that, when the stewards do come to their own again, they will crowd out somebody...
-Promote The Good Cooks
There is no school wherein a young man can learn thoroughly the masterful duties of the hotel steward but the live hotel itself. There are three departments in which the business may be learned. From ...
-How Stores Are Issued And Charged
The proprietor of a hotel of small or medium capacity generally has no patience with the red tape methods of making requisitions, booking and checking and counter-checking, which he may hear are pra...
-The Storekeeper Must Rise Early
One of the most serious of the minor difficulties is connected with the issuing of supplies early in the morning. If the bakers and cooks get a late start, not only will the breafast be ill-cooked and...
-The Store-Room Issue Book
The following pages show three different ways of keeping the issue book. The first is for a written book, an ordinary blank journal will answer, and the storekeeper will draw a line or two on each pag...
-The Store-Room Issue Book. Part 2
Baker And Pastry Cock Pages 38 and 39 show, greatly reduced in size, leaves from the most elaborate form of storeroom account book. Blank books of this pattern with the headings, rulings and everyt...
-Store Room Accounts
A blank book of unusually large size is required for the elaborate method of keeping the store room accounts shown on preceding pages, in fact it is intended for both storekeeper and steward or manage...
-Changing Cooks In A Large Hotel
This is the most serio-comical occurence that ever takes place in grand establishments. Some hotels make changes so often that all concerned get used to it, they get the mode of procedure down to a fi...
-How The New Chef Begins His Duties
Sometimes the change of cooks is made by common consent when the one wants to get away for reasons of his own, and there is then no secresy and no surprise, which must be regarded fortunate for the ne...
-The Drinking Habits Of Cooks
While there are and can be only a very few hotels of the largest size and highest style, what few there are have great influence in setting the fashions in interior management, and many among the vast...
-How To Write The Bill Of Fare
With a great many persons occupied daily in the preparation of the hotel dinners, the composition of the bill of fare is the one literary effort of their life, it is their first timid step upon the th...
-The Hotel Press And Recent Improvements
The good taste and good sense which characterizes the hotel bill of fare in general is largely attributable to the course of teaching and criticism of the hotel newspapers for, up to a few years ago, ...
-Bill Of Fare Or Menu
Strictly speaking these words are not of quite the same significance. The menu is the fare, the bill of fare is to tell what the fare consists of; the menu is the lay out, the bill of fare is the it...
-Headings Of No Headings?
The above very excellent bill is strictly in accord with the opinions and teachings of the hotel press, unless an exception be taken to the cigar line at the bottom, and particularly so in regard to t...
-What Should The Headings Be?
The ordinary headings are soup, fish, boiled, roasts, entrees, vegetables, cold dishes, pastry, dessert. That is for common life without any pretentions to style, and the order of arrangement is as th...
-What Should The Headings Be? Part 2
Hors D'Ceuvres Sardines. Prawns. Caviare. Foie Gras. Olives. Clear Turtle. Thick Turtle. Soles a la Normande. Stewed Eels en Matelotte. Turbot, Hollandaise and Tartar Sauces. Fried S...
-What Should The Headings Be? Part 3
Fifth Avenue Hotel, New York Oysters on half shell Soups. Paysanne Clam Fish. Boiled Haddock, shrimp sauce Baked Sole, Genoise. Small Potatoes. Releves. Leg of Mutton, caper sauce Co...
-Serving Potatoes With Fish
A cursory examination of the hotel bills of fare from all parts of the country will show that the custom of serving potatoes in some fancy form with fish has become very general, so much so that a bil...
-Which First, Joints Or Entrees?
It will be observed that in all the example bills of fare thus far shown the roast meats appear after the entrees; in the first one the entrees come next after the fish, in the others the fence is st...
-Three Royal Examples
Not to depend upon the idealism for high sanction, however, the following menu of an actual affair shows a pretty good pattern of the American style; that is of the essential part, for these menus nev...
-The Place For The Cold Meats
Those who wish to find good authority for placing the small side dishes of cucumbers, celery, etc., after the fish instead of before, with the idea of something to take away the taste of fish, have ...
-The Place For The Cold Meats. Continued
Dinner From 6 To 7.30 Soup Green Sea Turtle, a l'Anglaise Consomme Royal. Fish Baked Florida Trout, aux Fines Herbes Celery Potato Croquettes. Boiled Corned Beef and Cabbage Leg of S...
-Current Criticisms
In one respect, at least, the writer of these lines has always been misunderstood by some readers. He has never denied that the French are the leaders of the fashions in dining as well as in other thi...
-A Representative Italian Bill Of Fare
Banquet to Signor Salvini, given by the Italian Colony in London, at the Panton Hotel (proprietor, Mr. R. Prattf). Covers laid for fifty. Dining room profusely decorated with flowers and with Italian ...
-The Dinner In Courses
Perhaps a better illustration of the form of making up an American-French course dinner could not be found than the annexed novelty, which turns up at the right time to verify the foregoing statements...
-The Sorbet Or Punch
There is a growing desire among proprietors and stewards, who endeavor to set the best tables, to adopt the punch, which appears in the middle of the French course dinner bill, between entree and game...
-"Those Everlasting Relishes"
This Is a minority report. There is almost always a minority that disagrees; somtimes the minority is called a respectable one, and it is allowed to present a report even after the question has been d...
-Specimen Irish Bill Of Fare
This specimen banquet bill from Ireland is very much like an American bill, and remarkable for being in plain English. There are too many kinds of meat for any use, as if they had learned that bad hab...
-How Many Dishes?
A glance over a number of hotel bills of fare of the same date will show that a great difference of opinion exists on this point, even to go no farther than New York, for the makers of the bill of one...
-One Soup Or Two?
The 60up question is one, again, of gas-tronomical education. The general pub-He, as we know it by hotel contact, demands thick soup, and all thin soups, clear soups, consommes, are repelled as insu...
-How Many Kinds Of Fish?
Probably, in pursuance of a desire to please everybody, it would be best to have two kinds of fish, as a baked and a boiled; a fish in fillets with tomato or Spanish sauce, and another whole with only...
-Conclusions As To The American Dinner Bill Of Fare
Some bills of fare of the best American hotels which appear to be quite wrong in arrangement when compared with French models are quite right according to Italian fashions. Some that are quite wrong a...
-A Representative American-Plan Bill Of Fare
Hotel Emery. Dinner Sunday, March 1st, 1885. Soup. Bisque of Oysters Consomme Royal. Fish Filet of Sole a l'Orly. Parisienne Potatoes. Chow Chow Ol/ves. Boiled Ham and Cabbage ...
-Lunch And Dinner Or Dinner And Supper?
This question comes up whenever any hotel assumes the rank of first-class, and is often a very perplexing one, for a few insist that they must dine at about six or seven in the evening or never, and i...
-How Much For Lunch?
The hotel man, as already observed, will find himself pulling the other way from a great number of his guests who, want to make a good square meal out of the one o'clock lunch, and as the waiters and ...
-What Sort Of Dishes For Lunch?
In the hotel cook books may be found sample lunch bills of fare which show how some hotels serve a number of breakfast dishes, such as hominy and milk, also baked beans, pigs' feet, codfish balls, and...
-The Breakfast Bill Of Fare
The common custom is to print the breakfast and supper bills in advance, perhaps a thousand at a time, and endeavor to have every dish that is named each morning or else mark it off. Where the hotel k...
-The Breakfast Bill Of Fare. Part 2
Breakfast Fruit Oat Meal and Grits with cream. Green, English, Breakfast and Japan Teas Coffee and Chocolate. Broiled Beefsteak, Plain, Tomato Sauce or Onions. Veal Cutlets, Plain or...
-The Breakfast Bill Of Fare. Part 3
The Sherwood. Breakfast TOMATOES BAKED APPLES FRUITS STEWED PRUNES OATMEAL HOMINY CRACKED WHEAT Bread, Cakes, Etc French Rolls Graham Rolls English Muffini. Boston Brown Bread Corn B...
-About The American Breakfast
There is no French pattern for the American breakfast bill; the French do not know anything about any such breakfasts as our hotels set out. The English have some idea of it, for they believe in takin...
-A Small Pattern, But Sufficient
Rather than be compelled to include almost everything in a stock bill of fare, and to cross off several dishes each morning because unattainable, it is better to name too few; have the bill printed wi...
-The American Supper Or Tea
The same thing that has been done for the breakfast could not be done for the supper; that is, the presenting of a set of bills that fit alike all hotels in any part of the country, for while there is...
-Rising Equal To The Emergency
For a hotel In a large and growing city, where bankers and merchants who would like dinner to be In the evening if it were convenient, are numerous among the guests, and where the trains bring many pa...
-Rising Equal To The Emergency. Continued
The new form of bill under consideration appears to be a compromise for all parties. A compromise used to be thought a good thing in the time of the great Henry Clay, and a compromise at one time was ...
-Fish Entrees Available For Supper And Breakfast
Broiled and Fried Fish of all Kinds. Cutlets of Black Bass, Genoise Sauce. Salmon Steak, Sicilian Sauce. Fillets of Whitefish, Remoulade Sauce. Fondue of Fish. Scalloped Fish. Panned...
-Part Second. Restaurant Stewarding
Comprising A Survey Of Various Styles Of Restaurants And Their Methods. Club Stewarding And Catering, Public Party Catering, Ball Suppers, Base Ball Lunches, Hotel Banquets, Etc. How To Prepare And Ho...
-The Rise Of The Restaurant
The rise of the restaurant is nearly always alike - semi-accidental. It might seem a curious line of argument to pursue, but it is more than likely it could be proven that of those who open a restaur...
-A Typical American Restaurateur
As true a type as the French M. Joseph of the restaurateur, as distinguished from the hotel keeper by all the traits we have already enumerated is the American, Mr. Taft, pictured below. He must indee...
-The Restaurant Steward And The Market Men
Mr. Taft evidently experienced keen enjoyment in his avocation, yet it may be doubted whether he, being practically without competitors, ever knew the supreme exultation of the city restaurant steward...
-How To "Stand In" With The Marketmen
The surest and best way to secure favors from the dealers is to be in a measure independent of them by opening communication with the same sources of supply which they draw from, at least often enough...
-A First-Class Restaurant Bill Of Fare
Regarded as reading matter a bill of fare may not have very strong claims upon the attention, but as showing what need the restaurateur has of extensive acquaintance with the markets and of ways and m...
-A First-Class Restaurant Bill Of Fare. Part 2
Entrees Blanquette of Veal a la Poulette.......................60 Poulec saute a l'Estragon..............................75 Lamb's Kidneys a l'ltalienne..........................60 Lobster...
-A First-Class Restaurant Bill Of Fare. Part 3
Fruit Strawberries and cream........25 Oranges.......................20 Rum omelette..................35 Dessert Pecan nuts.................... 15 Almonds.......................15 ...
-A Few Entrees And A Little Management
No matter how high the prices or how wealthy the establishment, it is found most difficult to keep a restaurant strictly on the cooked to order method; provisions, however well cooked, will remain u...
-The Merchants' Lunch House
Of a contrary description is the merchants' lunch house - a kind of restaurant that thrives by the necessities and not the luxuries of its patrons. One that is not obliged to secure new and inviting c...
-The Merchants' Lunch House. Part 2
Cold Meats Lobster Salad....................................30 Chicken Salad..................................30 Bean Salad......................................25 Pressed Corned Beef........
-The Merchants' Lunch House. Part 3
Pudding And Pies Granula Pudding, Vanilla Sauce................10 Mince Pie, 10. Apple Pie, 10. Custard Pie. Lemon Pie. Cranberry Pie. Pumpkin Pie, 10 Miscellaneous Codfish Tongues on Toas...
-The Bakery Lunch
One of the greatest successes among Chicago lunch businesses is remarkable for the narrow compass in which it is carried on and the lack of any outward indications that would lead a stranger to suspec...
-The Place And Not The Man
Examples of successful places where the man and his efforts amount to nothing, but the location is everything, are plentiful enough. Here is a sample of a curious kind of business dependent only upon ...
-The Bar Room Free Lunch
And yet, after all, perhaps the bartender of the preceding instance gained an insight of the restaurant business through the practice prevalent in some cities of serving a roast-beef and-trimmings lun...
-The Oyster And Fish Restaurant
For something different from the conventional style of first-class restaurant and which may be claimed as peculiarly American, we turn with pleasure to the first class oyster house, very probably the ...
-The Oyster And Fish Restaurant. Part 2
Fish Crab Salad.......................................50 Omelet.....................................50 Blue Fish......................................40 Weak Fish...........................
-How The Pay Is Collected
One purpose of going over the different classes of business in a talk about restaurant stewarding was to observe the different methods which restaurateurs adopt for collecting the pay from customers. ...
-The Common Meal Check
The common way and which seemingly is good enough for a small business is to provide small cards printed with the small sums and perhaps a line or two, as: Your Bill Is: 20 Cents. Please Pay ...
-The Written Order Check
One of the restaurant keepers briefly alluded to in a former chapter, professed not to believe in the honor or honesty of any person where money is concerned. It may have been only his business code w...
-The Great American Restaurant System
There is a curious though distant resemblance between the most carefully conducted English hotels and such American restaurants as are attached to the great resort hotels, in their methods of dealing ...
-The Bouillons-Duvals System
The system of popular, cheap and good Parisian restaurants, world-renowned under the name of the Bouillons-Duvals, have received the most unbounded praise and also most unmitigated abuse, yet their gr...
-Spiers And Pond's London Restaurants
The great firm of London caterers mentioned above as instituting a Duval restaurant in the English capital on trial, in that proceeding did but give another example of the wonderful push and enterpr...
-Club Stewarding And Catering
Clubs having no proprietor or one who stands in the hotel landlord's place, are organized as to their eating and drinking departments in either of these two ways: The smaller clubs have a house comm...
-About Clubs In General
A good deal has been said about the difficulty of filling the positions offered by club houses, and it is true that only a few men are adapted to become the abject servants which the aristocratic club...
-Party Catering
The tendency to choose the principal hotels of a city as the place to give party spreads as well as public banquets is on the increase, and it is now the case that in some of the largest there is scar...
-Mistakes In Entertaining
We can never find out from the published reports in the newspapers whether an entertainment tendered for some specific purpose was satisfactory to those entertained or not, particularly if the good na...
-Rules For Party Catering
1. Never, if possible to avoid it, agree to furnish refreshments for a party without having the committee to bind itself to pay for some certain number whether they come or not. Four times out of five...
-Rules For Party Catering. Some Exceptions
And now, having penned down the foregoing rules which experience has shown me are reliable guides to base calculation! upon - most especially the pound-to a-person rule, the pint-of-fluids rule and th...
-Ball Suppers
It is so commonly the case that the dance and the supper both have to take place in the one room, the hotel dining room, because there is not a second room large enough, that, in offering these sugges...
-How To Set The Tables - Small Tables
The most entirely satisfactory way of setting out a ball supper, if the pleasure of the participants is to be the main object, is the setting of the small separate tables the same as they are at dinne...
-What Makes The Difference In Cost Of Suppers
Referring to the foregoing as a sample, I will offer a little information now to the committees who come proposing a nice pleasant social hop, you know, and a little plain refreshments - we don't wan...
-Quantities And Qualities
If you have the roast-cook to plain-roast 40 chickens for part of the supper of the 150 or 160 persons, who will be seated at the 20 eight-seat tables before mentioned, and when the chickens have beco...
-What Decorated Meat Dishes Consist Of
The 40 decorated cold meat dishes named for our sample ball supper may consist of anything in cold meats which is named in any of the bills of fare to be found in these pages; but to be explicit the p...
-What The Ornamental Baskets Of Cake Contain
As far as the giving an inviting appearance to the tables is concerned the baskets or stands of cut cake have quite as good an effect as elaborately ornamented cakes, provided the cut cakes are made s...
-What The Moulded Ices And Jellies Are
It is a pity to have to say what they are, for the grand endeavor 'of caterers both public and private is to get something new in this line to beat somebody else. There is an effort to make new effect...
-Setting Long Tables
These small tables may be placed end to end to make two long tables down the hall, but in locating them it is necessary to ascertain by actual trial whether after placing the two rows of chairs there ...
-The Stand-Up Supper
It is not to be inferred that these following described ways of serving suppers are any less the ways of the haut-ton, are any less fashionable and proper than the regular set table because they are s...
-The Handed Supper
It Is not to be denied, however, that the stand-up supper is but the meal of expediency; not the most comfortable for the participants, but only the best that can be done under certain circumstances. ...
-The Ornamental Handed Supper
The last described being the plainest and easiest, the portions on the plates all prepared outside and no whole dishes having to be shown, is the sort of supper which hotel-keepers can best afford to ...
-Part Third. Catering for Private Parties
A Guide To Party Catering. Wedding Breakfasts, Fantasies Of Party Givers, Model Small Menus And Noteworthy Suppers, With Prices Charged. Also, Catering On A Grand Scale Original And Selected Examples ...
-Lady Caterers
Many ladies are engaged in catering for private parties; they may be found in every town and city. They usually carry on some other small shop business or a ladies' restaurant for down town shoppers; ...
-More Rules For Stewards And Caterers
Scarcely ever two party affairs are exactly alike and set patterns seldom fit the case, but the individual comes in and exercises his own skill and knowledge within certain bounds of propriety and goo...
-Anniversary Ball Supper For 200
The committee wanted it fine for $5 per couple including ball. One hundred couples expected. It was a good-sized .town (called a city), with two or three hotels, but without a regular caterer in bus...
-A Young Lady's Birthday Reception For 50
Had 2 small turkey gal ntines; one sliced on plates, other decorated in a mould of aspic on table and about half used. Chicken salad of 4 chickens and 1 doz. heads of celery and one quart of dressi...
-Snow-Bound Dinner
Dinner for about 200 railroad passengers snow-bound on a train in the far West; dinner given free by the railroad compat.y at the next station reached. Made a western hotel dinner, but greater part re...
-Church Festival
To be as cheap as possible, to raise money to pay the pastor. Committee furnished the raw material only; the hotel-keeper gave everything else, use of rooms, fire, lights, cooking and incidental lab...
-Club Reception
For 26 persons, both ladies and gentlemen, the material cost about $60, of which $20 was for terrapin. Flowers and florists services about $40; catering about $40; and with the hire of ten different s...
-Cold Lunch For 300
Governor's Guard and other military companies passing through. Prepared and used: 1. Salted round of beef, bound around with twine, boiled, pressed while cooling; raw weight 50 pounds, weight when ...
-Private Reception
For 70, in May, at a family residence; parlor and dining room connected by slid ing doors. Hostess provided material on written requisition; work done in the house. Florist called in, decoraed dining ...
-Catering Experience Of An English Manager
Many land owners give audit dinners (or rent day dinners) in hotels, when the tenant farmers come to pay their rent. These dinners are sometimes very cheap, still they are often attended by a large n...
-Base-Ball Or Cricket Lunch For 50 At 60 Cts
Boiled Round of Beef, about 20 lbs. Roast Sirloin (with horseradish), about 20 lbs. 2 Beefsteak Pies, 2 Veal and Ham Pies. 8 each Rhubarb and Gooseberry tarts. 8 Custards. Salad, Bread, Bu...
-A. Reception. Complimentary To A Lady At A Memphis Hotel
Menu Bouillon From the hand to the mouth the soup is often lost. - Trans, fr. Fr. CELERY. Fried Oysters An oyster may be crossed in love. - Sheridan. Petits Bouchees, Aux Salpico...
-Fantasies Of Party Givers
It has been remarked already, the whole world of party givers are constantly straining after something new, or, if not a fresh Invention, something new to their own circle, and by way of showing what ...
-Fantasies Of Party Givers. Continued
A Violet Supper A 'Clnderalla' supper, recently served in Paris, was rendered quite charming by the free introduction of the modest flower which 'opens with the earliest breath of spring.' All the...
-The Plateau
The engraving on the preceding page makes it easy to explain what is meant by the very old and most enduring fashion of the plateau or central ornament of the dinner table. The table shown has no plat...
-A Figurative Dinner
Moore used to speak of a dinner party at Prince Esterhazy's, where he had the honor to 'assist.' All the meats were represented in carved wood, beautifully painted. The guest pointed to the dish he w...
-A Figurative Dinner. Continued
Fish Dinners In Paris The Paris 'fish dinners' for Wednesdays and Fridays are especially studied by hostesses to impress their visitors with the cleverness of their cook, who can serve up a most v...
-Floral Decorations At President Arthur's State Dinners
The Marine Band was stationed at the large entrance hall and played during the evening, and the apartments on the lower floor were thrown open and decorated. In the East Room the mantels were banked ...
-President Cleveland's Table - Revolving Globe. Bass In Jelly
The centre of attraction in the dining room was the long white damasked table, about which the thirty-eight guests of the evening sat with the President and Miss Cleveland. The gilded central plateau...
-Floral Decorations At The Princess' Ball
The ball to the Princess Louise and the Marquis of Lome at the Windsor Hotel in Montreal, brought out the elite, and, as it was the farewell to the Queen's daughter, more than ordinary attention was ...
-Decorated Dishes At Mrs. Vander-Bilt's Reception
One piece was a game pie of pheasants, the pie resting on a flat surface of wax, the entire piece upheld with deer's antlers. The sides of the pie were trimmed with quails. Underneath were two rabbit...
-Mrs. Vanderbilt's Diamond Ball
The grandest and probably most expensive ball which ever took place in New York was given by Mrs. Vanderbilt about three or four years previous to the reception alluded to above. It was described as ...
-The Progressive Dinner Novelty
The progressive dinner has leaped at one bound into popular favor. This new freak of New York festivities imposes on each geust of the masculine persuasion the duty of moving at the end of each cours...
-This Lady Had A New Idea
Recently Senora Romero, the wife of the Mexican Minister at Washington, gave a special afternoon reception, at which Mexican chocolate was made by a Mexican girl before the company. The girl, who wa...
-Different China For Each Course
A few years ago the dinner set signified every piece used upon the table from the soup set to the after dinner coffees, but fashion has changed all this and the different courses are much more effec...
-Changing Decorations For Each Meal
One of the British princes was recently entertained at the country seat of a nobleman at a hunt breakfast and dinner, and the decorations and table ware were changed for each as follows: Hunt Bre...
-A Boating Club's Fantasy
The table was decorated with glass ware in the shape of small boats mounted on plateaux of looking-glass, surrounded by sage-green plush borders, fringed by silk blond lace of a lighter shade. The bo...
-Scene Painted Ball Suppers
The buffet was shaped in the convenient horse-shoe style, and dressed with the usual holly, mistletoe, bay, laurel, and rosemary; also a goodly show of chrysanthemums and hot-house flowers - the latt...
-Ska Caverns And Fairy Grottos
At Lord X's, one of the wealthiest peers of the realm, great preparations are being made for the coming of age of the heir. He was a veritable Christmas box to his family, being born on boxing-day, a...
-A Sea Shell Dinner
The host has a favorite hobby - con-chology - and a most superb collection of shells, corals, and algae, and the caterer pressed the whole into his service, and turned out what the hostess was please...
-A Wedding Banquet
The following is the menu of a wedding banquet served at the Southern Hotel, St. Louis. Covers were laid for one hundred and fifty persons. It was quite a swell affair, the contracting parties being M...
-Grand Wedding Receptions
In the first place it is necessary, when receiving the order for the 'wedding collation,' to see the premises. The confectioner, chef, or contracting party must view the rooms. The shape of the draw...
-Grand Wedding Receptions. Continued
From forty to fifty small tables are arranged with four seats to each, menu cards form the centre-piece. The prettiest I have seen were triangular, of white porcelain, headed with a cupid perched in a...
-Wedding Breakfasts, And The Prices Charged
[From the London Caterer]. Lent will soon be over, then comes the time when so many marriages are celebrated, and as It has now become much the fashion to hold the wedding breakfast at some good ho...
-Wedding Breakfasts, And The Prices Charged. Part 2
Menu N0. 4 Oysters. Nouille Soup. Aspic of Lobster. Fillets of Soles in Savoury Jelly. Fillets of Chicken, Tartar Sauce, Galantine of Veal. Boiled Fowls with Truffles. Roast Chickens...
-Wedding Breakfasts, And The Prices Charged. Part 3
Menu No. 7 Potage de Gibier Clair. Petits Croustades aux Huttres. Choux froid de Perdrix aux Truffes. Cotelettes de Mouton a la Provencale. Salades d'Homard a la Victoria. Mayonnaise...
-Something About The Cost
A dozen big suppers have been given this winter at a cost of $50 per person. The flowers at the famous Vanderbilt ball cost $12,000. The roses for Mrs. Bradley Martin's dinner and cotillon cost $15,0...
-Something About The Cost. Continued
Two Dollars Without Wine For dinners in private rooms the prices vary. Here is the menu of a dinner at 7s. 6d. a head, given by the editor of a society paper to his staff of lady contributors: C...
-Temperance Catering
Do you cater to the so-called temperance people? asked the writer. Yes, and while there is no wine served from bottles, we manage to introduce enough of it to make the company lively. There is m...
-Prohibitionists And Fashionable Cookery
There is no little stir among the prohibitionists who attended the great banquet at Martinelli's the other night, for it has been discovered that brandy, wine, white and red, and other liquors were se...
-Too Rich For His Blood
The Major-General in charge of the militia here (San Francisco), after reading the interview which a reporter had with the captain of the salvation army, coneluded that he ought to show him some mili...
-Sarcastic, But Suggestive
The caterer for the ball or dinner at the residence of the hosts often supplies all the linen and table ware, as well as the decorations and feast. The caterer generally has a large supply of the art...
-Stewarding And Catering On A Grand Scale. Stewarding At Harvard University
The boarding of the Harvard students is managed on the co-operative plan by a Harvard Dining Association, which is like the house committee of many clubs, but on a larger basis, the different clas...
-Stewarding At Vassar College
We have no patience with those journals which indulge in ungallant remarks and ribald laughter over the annual statement of what the sweet Vassar girls have been eating during the school year. The fi...
-Stewarding At Windsor Castle
The holidays bring a wealth of work for the cooks at Windsor. The kitchen, on the north side of the castle, is fitted elaborately enough to delight the heart even of a Careme. The apartment is nearly...
-Steamship Stewarding
The Atlantic steamship City of New York is commanded by Capt. Frederick Watkins, and his right hand man, the chief officer, is S. F. Barff. To help these two to navigate the ship six deck officers ar...
-The Purchasing Steward Of A Large Hotel
The following was one day's marketing, bought before and about sunrise, for the Fifth Avenue Hotel, New York; a fair example of the daily purchases, making allowance for fluctuations of business at di...
-The American Game List
For nearly thirty years an annual game dinner has been given by Mr. John B. Drake, proprietor of the Grand Pacific Hotel, Chicago. The number of guests is usually 500, and they are attended at table b...
-The American Clam Bake
Mr. Sol. Sayles, the well-known butcher of Sixth avenue, gave his annual clam bake to his sixty odd employes at his country seat, Eleanor Villa, beautifully situated at Long View, on the Raritan Rive...
-The American Barbecue
It is commonly called roasting oxen or other animals whole; the word itself is French barb-a-que - from head to tail - but in practice so many disappointments occur through the meat coming from the ba...
-An Electric Lighted Barbecue
Over four thousand persons, from the neighborhoods and towns of both High and Low Harrogate, assembled and took part in the proceedings, which were, from beginning to end, conducted in a successful m...
-How An Ox Was Boiled Whole
A correspondent of the Times mentions an experiment, rare, if not unprecedenled, which was tried on Jubilee Day at Liss, a village on the London and South-Western Railway in Hampshire. It consisted i...
-The Number, Weights And Price - A Pound To A Person
The energetic proprietor of the White Horse Hotel, Romsey, and the Tregonwell Arms, at Bournemouth, recently carried out a large job in the catering line. On the occasion of the great Liberal Fete at...
-The Governmental Banquet To 3,000 French Mayors
The great gastronomic fete held in a wing of the Exhibition building on the Champ de Mars, Paris, last month, July 1888 has been a good deal discussed in the newspapers, but no authentic account of t...
-A Railway Eating House In Sweden
The station at Katrineholm I shall never forget, nor the dinner that I had there. I was exceedingly hungry, having started early in the morning, and when the guard cried 'tjugo for middag' (twenty mi...
-Breakfast For 10,500 People
The High Sheriff of Lancaster, Mr. James Williamson, of Ryelands, in that county, has marked his assumption of office by a prof use and princely hospitality. On the nth of last month, the date of his...
-Catering At The Manchester Exhibition
The Manchester Exhibition refreshment contract, one of the biggest ever undertaken, which, it will be remembered, was secured by Mr. A. Mackenzie Ross, of the Cafe Royal, Edinburgh, is now in full w...
-How 30,000 Children Were Fed
We have received from Mr. P. C. Javal, of the firm of Spiers and Pond, Limited, detailed particulars of their general scheme for the supply of refreshments to the 30,000 children who assembled In ...
-Catering For The Multitude
The great popular carnival, Whitsuntide, imposes a strain upon the resources of caterers which outsiders can but imperfectly realize. At the Inventions Exhibition, for example, Messrs. Spiers and Pon...
-Stewarding For The Sultan
There are over six thousand persons, says the New York Herald, fed three times a day at Dolma Bagtche Palace while the Sultan is there. To keep all this great machinery of supply in perfect order, so...
-The Army Hospital Steward
The army steward is like the under steward of a steamship. He is subordinate to the surgeon of the ward, who acts as upper steward in some respects. The hospital steward has his cooks and assistants a...
-Exposition Catering - What It Costs To Cater And What The Chances Are For Profits
Atlanta, Ga., Oct. 17th, '87. Here is a great business which is intirely unrepresented in American journalism, and carried on entirely without system, almost without understanding; a new set of moths...
-Catering At The Piedmont Exposition
If anything can be made in a dining room and restaurant enterprise on the fair grounds, when everything is favorable to success, the venture at this place ought to turn out well. I write now of the ea...
-Catering At The Piedmont Exposition. Continued
In competition with these two dining establishments the fair directors also licensed, and our proprietors by their contract agreed to, a large barbecue hall, where sliced roast meat and bread can be o...
-Training A Storekeeper
Old Colonel Vesey was standing by when I was trying to instruct Tom, our storekeeper, how he must do to meet the views of the hotel company and especially the company's very exact and methodical bookk...
-Training A Storekeeper. Part 2
Technical hotel bookkeeping is learned at business colleges, but after that it is found that different systems are followed in different places. Mr. Tatillonner was a man of superior attainments in th...
-Training A Storekeeper. Part 3
Oh dear, she continued, about half in earnest, which road do you think Tom took when he ran away? I may have to go the same route. But I told her there was nothing to be discouraged about; all she ...
-The Headwaiter And His Troops. The Headwaiter
The headwaiter is an important officer, with forces under his command. When there is a banquet or a large dinner the guests are placed in a position of great peril, liable to come to grief; for there ...
-The Headwaiter And His Troops. The Headwaiter. Continued
The Headwaiter's Importance The degree of importance of the head-waiter varies according to the disposition of different proprietors, for in some hotels the latter likes to pass up and down through...
-Scarcity Of Good Headwaiters
There never can be very many of the highest type of headwaiters, the requirements of the position are such that not many men combine all the necessary qualifications, and when a pioprietor is preparin...
-The Foreign Headwaiter
We have in this country certain ways of our own of hotel keeping which may be better than any methods of other lands, but we also have hotels as well as clubs and restaurants which are conducted under...
-In American Hotels
If the headwaiter of an American hotel is to have time to play the Mezzofanti, the Henry, or Eugene, and go around from table to table chatting and so forth, trying to make every guest feel sa...
-Organizing The Troops
The headwaiter's duties have now been pretty clearly outlined, his relations to the steward and chef having been defined in the first part of this book. And the difference betwixt a front view and an ...
-Watch On - Watch Off
Both watches of waiters wait on the tables every day, but only one watch does the side work, the cleaning, dusting and preparation, the late, last minute waiting; the extra waiting on late arrivals- t...
-Let The Headwaiters Tell It
There are some things about the head waiter's position which only the headwait-ers themselves can properly depict, and any one who may be in training for such a responsible situation may find some per...
-What The Dining Room Chief Talks About
It has been mentioned incidentally that the headwaiter has something to say to his men when they are drawn up in a line before him. This is the custom not universally followed. Some headwaiters have l...
-Waiters' Drill For A Banquet
Perhaps there is no need of argument to show the advantage of such a moderate amount of daily drilling, as has been described but a few pages back. It has the same use for a body of waiters that it ha...
-Regulations For Gas Institute Dinner
Waiters will be divided into two classes, namely, Entree Men and Vegetuble Men. Entree Men will be distinguished by wearing a red ribbon in their left button holes, and Vegetable Men by a white rib...
-Who Are The Best Waiters?
The question is often asked, but only for amusement or to gratify some prejudice by a specious answer. It must be a very unsatisfactory sort of generalization to say that waiters of this nationality o...
-Waiters' Wages And Tips
Those New York waiters, no matter what race or nation they were of, knew which side their bread was buttered on, as the old saying is, for while tipping goes on quite liberally in this country if it...
-Cherubs At The Hotels
There is something uncanny about these mature children of the town. I was at the Windsor Hotel at dinner with some friends a short time ago when a pompous little woman strode down the long dining room...
-London Waiters
The waiters over there have a good way of not despising small tips. Little sums and a good many of them are what counts up big at last. The way it is here one person will give perhaps half a dollar, t...
-The London Check-System
When a waiter enters the service of the principal London restrarateurs he has to bring with him ten dollars for 'working money,' as it is called. He pays this in to the cashier and gets ten dollars w...
-Paris Waiters
There was another thing the Paris waiters went out on strike about besides the Anti-Pourboire newspaper. It appears that they all go to employment offices when they are out of work and have to pay to ...
-Tricky Waiters
Waiters who have to work under such disadvantageous conditions as those the Paris waiters struck about are driven to all sorts of schemes to get even. This is one way, as a correspondent tells it: ...
-Berlin Waiters
I fancy all the good waiters leave Berlin, and that none but poor ones stay be hind. One meets with excellent German waiters in middle-class English houses, and never, as far as my experience goes, ...
-A German Baron As A Waiter
I was dining with a friend at one of the most noted restaurants in London - not a hundred miles from Regent Street. We had a most attentive waiter, whose face seemed very familiar to me, and all thr...
-Female Waiters
It is said that the Bouillon-Duval restaurants of Paris employ about 8,000 women, of whom over 5,000 are waiters in the many different establishments belonging to that company. We have seen in a previ...
-New York Waiter Girls
The custom of employing pretty waiter girls in the restaurants in lower New York increases. They bring a certain class of patronage, but the patronage is not a very lucrative one to the proprietors o...
-A Dining Room Juno
A Boston lady who returned from the White Mountains last week told the Historian about an interesting experience that she had when she went there. She was greatly taken on the train going to the mount...
-The Pennsylvania-Dutch Waitress
Ter bodatiss iss all. This remark was made by a rosy-cheeked, black-eyed dining room girl in a most excellent Pennsylvania Dutch inn, in a Lancaster county village. I had just called for another ...
-The Mischief Of Pretty Waiter Girls
[From the St. Fames Gazette]. Though the soup may be clear and the fish may be good, And the lamb and the sparrowgrass tender. How on earth can a person attend to the food. That attendants so...
-Girls On A Strike
A rather funny and somewhat unusual strike is reported at a Swampscott (Mass.) summer hotel. Nineteen table girls struck for an advance of 50 cents a week. It seems there was a ball at the house, and...
-Colored Waiters
The great majority of all the waiters in the United States now are colored men, and the number is steadily increasing. A white waiter at a meeting a year or two back pointed out to his fellows that th...
-Troubles Common To All
It is often remarked that waiters must above all things have good memories. The possession of a good memory itself, however, does not account for all the feats of a good waiter who carries in five or ...
-The Tyranny Of The Chef
Another trouble common to all waiters is to be learned from this, making a little allowance for the exaggeration of the sums named: One of the best waiters in a wellknown down-town restaurant att...
-A Few Types Of Waiters
I There are incoherent waiters, And waiters who are rough; Apologetic waiters. And waiters who are tough. There are waiters quite forgetful. And absent-minded, too, And waiters always wait...
-Didn't Make It That Time
In his entertaining book, 'The Ambassadors of Commerce,' Mr. Allen tells the following little story: The Saracen's Head Hotel, Lincoln, was noted for three things: a very gruff landlord, a very cheek...
-Student Waiters
A watering-place correspondent says: Passing through the dining room of a summer hotel one afternoon I saw the headwaiter, a fine, handsome young man from one of our New England colleges, reading Vir...
-In The White Mountains
Twas at college first I met him, There competing for a prize; And he gave his deep oration. All his soul within his eyes. Twas a masterpiece, in Latin, Full of feeling, fire and thought, Rich...
-A Treasure Of A Waiter
A tight pair of light pants, a shirt of which the bosom shone like a bald head, a Rhine-stone collar-button which fastened an immaculate collar to the aforesaid shirt, a black alpaca round-about and ...
-Trials Of The Waiter Girls
Cranks, said the girl waiter, always blossom out in their full glory when they eat. Some of them never know enough to give an order and five minutes after it is cooking will want me to change it. O...
-Waiters' Christmas
(Chicago Hotel World.) Mr. Plummer, headwaiter of the Mi. lard, Omaha, received a costly manicure set from his waiters. Mr. O. H. Lane, headwaiter at the Ho tel Worth, Chicago, besides other gifts,...
-Part Fourth. Whitehead's Dictionary Of Dishes. Model Small Menus
Culinary Terms And Various Information Pertaining To The Steward's Department, Being The Essence Of All Cook Books, Telling In Brief What All Dishes And Sauces Are, Or What They Should Look Like. What...
-Model Small Menus. Part 2
An Acrostic Menu The following complimentary menu to a young lady named Lilian does credit to its author: L es hultres d'Ostend. I talian et Printanier Royal. L ottes a la Massillon. I ...
-Model Small Menus. Part 3
Dinner Given By A Physician A dinner given by one of the medical attendants of the late Prince Leopold. Menu Clear Soup. Salmon. Oyster Patties. Sweetbreads. Lamb. Guinea Fowls...
-Mr. Irving's Best Dinner
In Irving's Impressions of America due prominence is given to the lavish feasting which attended the well-known artist's triumphal progress through the states. He was greeted everywhere with complim...
-A King Flush And A Royal Dinner
Menu of a notable dinner given by Earl Cadogan at Chelsea House to the royalties in London. Covers were laid for forty-eight. The company included the King of Denmark, the King of Greece the King of t...
-An Excellent Dinner
At the house of one of the most elegant of the grandes dames of Paris: Menu Consomme Royal. Tartelettes a la Russe. Filets de Turbots Chambord. Selles de Marcassin, Sauce Tartare. Ca...
-Dramatic Supper
Supper served on the stage of the Gaiety Theatre here on the occasion of the 100th representation of Le Grand Mogol, and offered by the lessee, Mr. Debruyere, and the authors of the piece, to the act...
-Good Cooking In Politics
The World's statement commences as follows: Lord Cadogan's chef is unquestionably a factor in politics, for the Lord Privy Seal's Saturday dinners are, in their way, almost as important as Lady Salis...
-A Chinese Dinner In New York
Excise Commissioner William S. Andrews, who has for years been ambitious to eat a regulation Chinese dinner, ate one last night, and thinks that he will be able to get out to-day. Wong Chin Foo was hi...
-A Mexican Menu
The Mexican idea of the first meal in the morning is a cup of coffee and a small loaf of bread or biscuit. The guest may have that in his room if he likes, and he can have it supplemented with a beefs...
-Tables Volantes Or Flying Tables
The inventors have a long way to travel before their tables can beat the magical appearance and disappearance of some tables I have seen in well managed hotels. Take this instance of preparation for a...
-A Quotation Menu
Private dinner at the Magnolia Hotel, St. Johns River, Florida: Huitres Lying with simple shells. Chateau Yquem. - Pericles, act iii, seene. When the butt is out we will drink water; not a...
-Whitehead's Dictionary Of Dishes. Culinary Terms And Various Information
Culinary Terms And Various Information Pertaining To The Steward's Department. Abalone - Aerated Wines Abalone A shell fish cooked and served in Chinese restaurants in...
-Agaric - A La Mode Beef
Agaric Mushroom, (botanical name), also the name recently adopted for a bottled liquor or bitters designed to fill a long felt want in prohibition communities. There are hundreds of species of agar...
-Albany Cakes - Alligator Steak
Albany Cakes The same batter as for popovers, baked in shallow pans to make a thin muffin. Hot for breakfast. Albemarle Pudding Sugar, eggs and pounded almonds in equal weights...
-Alligator Eggs - Ambergris
Alligator Eggs Are eatable and sometimes displayed for sale in Florida markets. They are esteemed by the natives of the West Indies, and so are crocodile's eggs in the East. Alligato...
-Amontillado - Aniseed
Amontillado Name of a popular brand of sherry, served with fish. Ammonia Hartshorn; sal volatile; volatile alkali; smelling salts. Carbonate of ammonia is used by bakers to raise ...
-Anna Potatoes Or Pommes A L'Anna - Appert's Process
Anna Potatoes Or Pommes A L'Anna Said to have originated at Delmonico's. Potatoes pared and sliced raw; replaced with butter between each slice and baked until done. Rich and expensive on account o...
-Friar's Omelet - Ardennes Salad
Friar's Omelet A pan or mould spread with soft butter and all the fine bread crumbs that will stick, apple marmalade mixed with eggs and nutmeg to nearly fill, covered with bread, baked until set, ...
-Arlequin Ices - Asses' Flesh
Arlequin Ices French spelling of Harlequin; ices of several colors mixed, like a harlequin's dress, such as a brick of ice cream made of 3 or 4 layers. Arles Sausages A kind forme...
-Asses' Milk - Backbone
Asses' Milk Has had a run at various times as a health food for children and consumptives. There used to be milk-stands in the London parks where the donkeys, sleek, curried and beautifully kept, w...
-Badger - Ball Stand Up Supper
Badger Like a small bear; eaten by hunters and trappers; tastes like wild boar. Bag Puddings The kind of puddings named in the poem: A bag pudding this king did make, And stuffed...
-Ball Supper Waste - Barbue (Fr)
Ball Supper Waste The waste of ball suppers of old was almost incredible. Ude states that he has known balls where the next day, in spite of the pillage of a pack of footmen, he has seen 20 or 30 h...
-Bartavelle - Bavarois (Fr)
Bartavelle Barnade bird; Scotch goose. Barley Sugar Old-fashioned sort of clear stick candy. No particular reason for the name, but taste resembling barley malt. Ba...
-Bay Leaf - Beefsteak Origination
Bay Leaf Used constantly, but in small quantities for boiling in soups and sauces. It imparts a flavor like that of plum kernels; is the leaf of a species of laurel; grows wild in parts of the Sout...
-Beef Soups - Beef Eaters
Beef Soups Several varieties having beef for the stock or principal ingredient, or having dice-cut beef in them. Beefsteak Pudding A boiled meat pie. The English make puddings of ...
-Beer Soup; Bier Suppe (Ger) - Birds' Nest Soup
Beer Soup; Bier Suppe (Ger) (1)-A traveler, who says he has often partaken of it in country houses' and at the beer houses in the cities, and that it is eaten cold, at least in summer, describes it...
-Biscuits - Black Puddings (Boudins Noir)
Biscuits Crackers in England and France are called biscuits; in the United States they are a shortened kind of rolls or breakfast-bread, usually eaten warm; name from two words signifying twice bak...
-Blanchailles - Boa
Blanchailles The French coined word for that small minnow-like fish, the famous English whitebait. Blanch To scald. It means to whiten, literally. To blanch almonds is to scald an...
-Boar's Head - Bouchee (Fr)
Boar's Head There has been more ceremo-niousness in the manner of serving the boar's head in olden times than with anything else save the peacock, and the survival of some old customs still makes t...
-Bouilli (Fr) - Bread Puddings
Bouilli (Fr) Boiled beef. Bouillon (Fr) Beef broth; also the general name for stock or soup liquor of any kind of meat. Bouride A La Marseillaise Fish stewed in ...
-Bread Pie A La Normandy - Brioche
Bread Pie A La Normandy A pie in a deep dish; made of cabbage, bread, sausage meat, an egrg, salt and pepper - amount of ingredients: the white part only of one or two heads cabbage boiled and minc...
-Brighton Rock Cakes - Bubble And Squeak
Brighton Rock Cakes Made to look rough by pulling off the dough with a fork on to the baking pan. Dough made of 1 1/2 lbs. flour, 1/2 lb. each sugar, butter, citron and currants, 1/2 oz. ammonia di...
-Buckwheat - Burta
Buckwheat Kind of grain that makes a gray flour like rye or poor wheat flour, and easily adulterated. Can be made into biscuits; principally used in making griddle cakes. Buckwheat Cakes...
-Butter - Cacao
Butter It is found that, no matter how fresh butter may be or well made, if it is white it is not satisfactory for table use. The color of butter is affected by the feed of the cows, green grass an...
-Caerphilly Cheese - Canetons (Fr)
Caerphilly Cheese A special kind produced in Wales. Cailles (Fr) Quails. Caisses (Fr) Little cases of paper or wafer paste, size of patty pans or tumblers and of...
-Canard Sauvage - Caper Sauce
Canard Sauvage Wild duck. Cane Syrup And Sugar Meaning the product of the sugar cane; not sorghum, nor beet sugar, nor glucose, nor maple. Candle-Fish A long, ee...
-Caper Substitutes - Cardinal Punch
Caper Substitutes The flower of the marsh marigold are used, and the pods of the nasturtium flower pickled; these are thought to be as good as capers. Capolitade De Volaille Piece...
-Cardinal Sauce - Cavaliers Broil
Cardinal Sauce It signifies red sauce, cardinal red having that name in allusion to the red capes worn by the cardinals of the Romish church. And the red sauce is made by mixing lobster coral - the...
-Cayuga Duck - Champagne Cream
Cayuga Duck The cayuga, like the canvas-back duck, is of great size when mature. Its fine dark flesh is of better flavor than that of an ordinary wild duck, like which it should be cooked. It makes...
-Champagne Sauce - Charlottes Glacees
Champagne Sauce Sauce made by mixing gooseberry or apple champagne with brown sauce and little sugar; served with roast ham. Channel Bass The redfish of the South, or sea bass. It...
-Chartreuse - Chester Pudding
Chartreuse An ornamental mould of vegetables, either cold or hot. (Se illustration on page 117.) A cold decorative chartreuse is made by cutting cooked vegetables of different colors into block...
-Cheshire Cheese - Chocolate Pudding
Cheshire Cheese English cheese of the same style as the staple York State and Western Reserve cheese of this country; large, medium rich, yellow, and generally of fine flavor. Chevre...
-Chop Houses - Citron Melon
Chop Houses English chop houses are growing in favor in New York. In this case it is not due to Anglomania, but to the solid comforts that can be enjoyed at the regulation chop houses. In a certain...
-Citron Cake - Cocoanut Oil
Citron Cake One pound butter, 1 pound sugar, twelve eggs, 1 nutmeg grated, 3 tablespoons rose-water, 1 pound flour, 1 pound citron thinly sliced. At least 20 different variations are made with citr...
-Cocoanut Shells - Cold Storage
Cocoanut Shells Used largely in the adulteration of ground pepper and other spices. The government analysts cite an instance of a New York firm having in a short time used and put upon the coc mark...
-Collation - Corn Ed Beef
Collation Lunch. College Pudding A plum-pudding mixture made up into balls size of an egg, floured, fried and served with wine sauce. College Pudding Baked Made of 6...
-Corned Fish - Crab Salad
Corned Fish Salted fish; not smoked. Cornucopia The horn of plenty; classical emblem of abundance; much used by cooks and confectioners in decorative work. Cosey ...
-Crab Apple - Cre Cream Cheese
Crab Apple Wild apples, valued for making crab apple jelly and crab cider. Cracker Meal Crackers crushed and sifted; used to bread cutlets, oysters and the like for frying. It is ...
-Cream Curd - Creole Cookery
Cream Curd Milk curdled with rennet, mixed with cream, drained in a cloth. Used for making real cheese cakes, mixed with sugar, butter-eggs, bread-crumbs, flavorings; baked in a crust Cream Curd Pu...
-Crepinettes - Crumpets
Crepinettes Small, thin pancakes made into turnovers with shredded bacon and truffles and some highly seasoned chicken forcemeat inclosed in the fold; brushed over with egg; baked; served with grav...
-Crust Soup - Currants
Crust Soup Croute-au-Pot. (See soups). Cucumber Though generally eaten raw as a salad it is good to cook in various ways. Cuisses (Fr) Legs. Cuisses D...
-Currant Lktueur - Dariole Moulds
Currant Lktueur A cordial; made of 2 lbs. red currants, 2 qts. whisky, thin rind of 4 lemons, 2 oz. ground ginger; let stand 48 hours, then strained through flannel jelly bag; to each quatt 1 lb. s...
-Darioles - Devil Sauce
Darioles Almost anything that is made shaped, steamed, baked or moulded in a dariole mould is called a dariole. Deep patties of a pastry crust filled with some kind of custard or stiff cream, flavo...
-Devonshire Junket - Dombey Pudding
Devonshire Junket Devonshire, the home of the Devon breed of cattle, is famous for dairy products and for clotted cream. The junket is curd and cream: 1 qt. milk, 1 tablespoon sugar, vanilla to f...
-Dory - Dundee Cake
Dory A fish. (See John Dory). Doucette (Fr) Corn salad; a kind of cress. Doughnuts Fried cakes; pieces of sweetened bread dough in ring or twisted shapes allowed...
-D'Uxelles Sauce - Endive
D'Uxelles Sauce (1)-Made of 1 pt. veloute, glass of white wine, and beef extract; mushrooms, red tongue and parsley chopped fine and mixed in. (2)-White sauce with chopped ham, mushrooms, parsley, ...
-Entrecote - Excellent Pudding
Entrecote Rib steak of beef. Entrecote De Porc A pork steak or slice cut anywhere. Entrecotes De Boeuf A La Bordelaise Thick rib steaks; broiled, with Bordelaise sauce a...
-Extract Of Beef - Financiere Garnish
Extract Of Beef A very useful preparation for enriching consommes and gravies, and making soup without much previous preparation of stock The Australian and Brazilian extracts are the likeliest to ...
-Financiere Sauce - Flounders
Financiere Sauce Brown sauce made with wine, lemon, mushrooms cut small, catsup and espagnole. Pins Herbs Sauce Brown sauce made of espagnole, chopped mushrooms, shallots and ...
-Flour - French Sauce For Oysters
Flour A barrel of good flour should make from 270 to 285 five-cent loaves. Many bakers blend four barrels, as two Minnesota springs and two Indiana winters, before they get the right alloy. ...
-French Rolls - Fromage (Fr)
French Rolls Indefinite; any good quality hot rolls; pocket book shaped rolls, split rolls, crusty cleft rolls, or tall, close-shaped bakery rolls. French Bread Indefinite. The br...
-Fromage De Cochon - Galopin
Fromage De Cochon Head cheese; a dish very popular in France; made by taking the skin off a pig's head in one piece, taking the meat from the bone and cutting it up with tongue, ears, some chitterl...
-Gammon Of Bacon - Gems
Gammon Of Bacon A leg of salt pork. English corruption of the French jambon, ham. Garfish A river-fish destructive to other fishes, generally thrown away as worthless when caught....
-Geneva Buns - Geoduck
Geneva Buns Sweet rolls made either by adding to light bread dough some enriching ingredients, or with 2 lbs. flour, 1 oz. yeast, 1 cup warm milk, to set sponge; 2 eggs, 6 oz. sugar, 6 oz. melted b...
-Gherkins - Godiveau (Fr)
Gherkins Small cucumbers of a dwarf kind; also young common cucumbers. Used for pickling. Gibier (Fr) Game. Pate De Gibier Game pie. Giblets The ne...
-Gondingo - Grenadins
Gondingo Florida Spanish name of a thick soup made of liver and giblets, onioqs, green peppers, and rice. Goo Goober Or Guber Pea Southern popular name for the pea-nut ...
-Grill - Guava
Grill Gridiron; broiler; a grill; a broil. Grill-Room English public kitchen where meats are broiled to order; sometimes on a silver gridiron and in sight of the customer. ...
-Guillemots - Hake
Guillemots The Normandy peasants make an excellent salmi from guillemots - the despised sea-crows of the Scotch - which is equal to woodcock, and superior to hare in flavor. Served with red wine, g...
-Hamburg Beef - Head Cheese
Hamburg Beef Beef cured in a salt pickle with spices and herbs; spiced beef. Hamburg Steak Beef sausage meat containing minced onion and a slight flavor of garlic, formed in flat ...
-Hedgehog - Hops
Hedgehog A correspondent says that he can from experience safely recommend a hedgehog stewed in milk as a real delicacy. It is well known that roast hedgehog is a favorite dish with English gypsies...
-Horly Or Orly - Ice Making Machines
Horly Or Orly It is spelled both ways by equally good authorities, is supposed to be the name of a French admiral. Only one dish seems to carry that designation, consequently a la Horly always sign...
-Ice Crushers - Indian Chutney
Ice Crushers Various devises for crushing, shaving and rasping ice are in the market, suitable for ice-cream freezers and bar-tender's use. Ice Cream Moulds They are made..full sh...
-Inde (Fr) - Japanese Crosnes
Inde (Fr) Coq d'Inde is the old name of the turkey, whence the present dinde. The old French is still sometimes used in bills of fare. Indienne (Fr) Relating to the East Indies. ...
-Japanese Plum - Jelly Cake
Japanese Plum A variety of plum recently acclimatized in Florida and suited to the climate. It is eaten raw, and made into preserves. Japanese Persimmon A newly introduced fruit o...
-Jersey Pudding - Kedgeree
Jersey Pudding Boiled pudding, made of 2 oz. ground rice, 1 oz. flour, 2 oz. sugar, 4 oz. butter; all worked together; 2 oz. chopped raisins, grated lemon-rind, 3 eggs, 2 spoons milk; well mixed; b...
-Kingfish - Kummel
Kingfish A southern sea fish of the Spanish mackerel variety. It is boiled and served with Hollandaise sauce, or baked with fine herbs, or split and broiled in the usual way for all fish, served wi...
-Lactometer - Larding Meat
Lactometer Glass instrument for ascertaining the quality of milk. (See Milk). Lady-Fingers The well known finger biscuits or Savoy biscuits made of sponge cake batter laid in fing...
-Larding Needles - Lennox Slices
Larding Needles Long needles having the butt end like a tube split open to admit the strips of bacon for larding meat. Lard A great deal of watered lard is now sold branded pure,...
-Lentils - Liqueur Candy With Eggs
Lentils Kind of pea used for soup; of a brown color, flattened shape. Lentils are said to contain twice the nourishment of flesh meat; the small Egyptians are the best. Boiled Lentils ...
-Litre - Lyonnaise Sauce
Litre The French quart; is about 2 1/2 American pints. Lizard I do confess, though, that on one of the last occasions of my dining in Honduras I did not feel that all was well, w...
-Livournaise Sauce - Magentas
Livournaise Sauce Cold, for boiled fish. It is mayonnaise with pounded anchovies and parsley worked in. Mace The inner coat of the nutmeg, between the nutmeg and the outside s...
-Maids Of Honor - Mango Pickles
Maids Of Honor A puff-paste tartlet with a cheese-cake filling is popular in England under that name, and two or three special makers of it have realized a competency. At one place this dainty has ...
-Manistee Fish - Marcassin
Manistee Fish One of the leading restaurants at Chicago had a novelty on its bill of fare last week, it being the first time that Manistee beef was ever placed before the Chicago public. Though ca...
-Marinade - Matelote
Marinade A bath of oil and vinegar or lemon juice, together with some aromatics, such as bay-leaves, thyme, onion, or according to the kind of meat to be marinaded or pickled, and salt and pepper. ...
-Mauviette (Fr) - Metzelsup
Mauviette (Fr) Lark. Same as alouette. Different names equivalent to meadow-lark, skylark. (See Alouette, Lark). Mayonnaise Salad sauce; also cold sauce for fish. Made by putting ...
-Michael Angelo's Pudding - Miroton (Fr)
Michael Angelo's Pudding Curd of milk turned with rennet, with fruits, boiled like a plum pudding. Made of 2 1/2 lbs. firm drained curd, 10 eggs, 1 lb. raisins, 1/4 lb. each preserved greengage, ap...
-Mock Crab - Mud Puppy
Mock Crab Cheese, bread crumbs, butter, vinegar, cayenne and salt, with an egg, made up to resemble devilled crabs, baked in shells. Mock Duck Thin beef steak covered with duck st...
-Muffin - Napolitaine, Sauce
Muffin The original English muffins are a flour batter-cake mixture, without eggs, raised with yeast and very light baked by pouring into tin rings set upon a hot griddle, or baking plate, and turn...
-Nasturtium - Norwegian Puddings
Nasturtium Well known garden flower of low trailing habit; the green seeds are pickled as a substitute for capers. Naturel(Fr) Plain. Pommes Au Naturel Potatoes plai...
-Nouilles (Fr) - Ormers
Nouilles (Fr) A yellow paste made of flour wetted with yolk of egg only, rolled out thin as paper, cut in shreds for soups, or cut in leaves and fancy shapes to decorate pates and meat pies with; a...
-Ornamented Cake - Ox-Tails
Ornamented Cake See Icing Cakes, Icing Tubes, Gum Paste. Oseille (Fr) Sorrel. A green herb used as greens and in soup. Puree D'Oseille Sorrel soup. ...
-Oyster-Plant - Paper Frills For Cutlets
Oyster-Plant Salsify,Scorzonera, . A white root with the taste of oysters. Grows to about the thickness of a ringer. Is best after frost in the spring of the year. Stewed Oyster Plant ...
-Paper Ruffles For Hams - Parsnip
Paper Ruffles For Hams Same as the preceding, or larger size to place upon the shank bone of a decorated ham. Paper Napkins See Japanese. Paper Shell Almonds Sof...
-Parfait (Fr) - Perch
Parfait (Fr) Perfect; perfection. Applied to some kinds of sweets and to ices. Same as excellent. (See Ices). Pastillage (Fr) Gum paste. Patates (Fr) Sweet potat...
-Perdrix, Perdreaux (Fr) - Pieces Montees
Perdrix, Perdreaux (Fr) Partridges; the latter term is applied to young birds. Perigord (A/A) With truffles; name of a town in France famous as a truffle market. Pe...
-Pigeons (Fr) - Plaice
Pigeons (Fr) Pigeons. The same in both languages. Pigeonneaux (Fr) Young pigeons; squabs. Pigeons, Wild There are times in some parts of the country when immense...
-Plantain - Poires (Fr)
Plantain A variety of banana, less sweet than the banana common in the markets and better suited to be baked with sugar. Plats - (Fr) Dishes of meats, etc. Plats Du Jou...
-Poireaux (Fr) - Pomegranate Melon
Poireaux (Fr) Leeks. Pois (Fr) Peas. Poisson (Fr) Fish. Poissoniere (Fr) Fish-kettle with drainer in the bottom. Poitrine De Vea...
-Pompano - Potato Poison
Pompano Choice southern fish from I pound to 4 or 5 pounds in weight; shaped like the sunfish, or pumpkin-seed fish, with very small scales, steel-gray color. It has a fine nutty flavor, which is...
-Pottuon's (Fr) - Pretzels
Pottuon's (Fr) Vegetable marrows; same as giraumous. Pot Herbs The soup bunch sold by market gardeners. Potted Meats They are of two classes, (1) The pasted meat...
-Printantere (A La) - Punch
Printantere (A La) With young spring vegetables, asparagus points in particular. Profiterolles One of the three or four names attached to the hollow puffs popularly known as cream...
-Puree - Radishes
Puree Mashed ingredients rubbed through a sieve or a colander. Purslane A garden weed with thick, fleshy stalks and leaves; it grows prostrate and spreads over the ground in rich ...
-Ragout - Raw Steak
Ragout The old term for Garnish. (See Garnishes.) A ragout is a rich compound stew, the components being all in small morsels. Raie (Fr) Ray or skate, sea fish. Raie A ...
-Ray - Rillettes De Tours
Ray A specie of flat fish of which there are several varieties. (See Stale). Richauffe (Fr) A re-cooked dish; cooked meat served up in some fresh form. Equivalent to kedgeree. ...
-Rissoles - Roman Punch
Rissoles Rissole and croquette both signify about the same thing, something crisp. The difference usually observed is to make the rissole with a coat of flour paste, the croquette with a coat of eg...
-Rook - Rusks
Rook A species of crow; the young are eaten, generally in the form of rook pie. Rossini (A La) The composer Rossini was a noted gourmet and particularly fond of truffles; the few ...
-Sabayon Or Sambaone - Saibling
Sabayon Or Sambaone A custard containing wine, whipped; a foaming pudding sauce. Sabatier Knives A special and favorite shape of cooks' knives, the name is that of the original Pa...
-Salamander - Samphire
Salamander An iron with a handle, like a shovel of extra weight, to be made red-hot for the purpose of browning the tops of dishes which cannot be set in the oven; it is held over near enough to to...
-Sandwich Island Dainties - Savory
Sandwich Island Dainties The following was the bill of fare at a dinner which was given recently by King Kalakaua to a party of American visitors: 'Raw shrimps, kukui nuts, taro, pci, cold chicken...
-Savoy Cabbage - Sea Cow
Savoy Cabbage A variety of cabbage with curly or crimpled leaves. Savoy Cake Sponge cake; called by the French, biscuit de Savoie. Scallop Shells Metal shells, s...
-Sea Kale - Siieerati
Sea Kale It is well known that this popular vegetable is used in a forced and always blanched state. It is a native of the seashore and cliffs of the south and west coasts of England. For centuri...
-Shrub - Sorrel
Shrub Name of a mixture of fruit syrup and spirit. Rum Shrub A mixture of 2 qts. rum with I qt. lemon syrup. Sippets Little pieces of bread for soup. Bread cut in th...
-Souffle - Soups Of Onions
Souffle A puff; something light. There are souffles of almost anything eatable. Whatever rises to an unusual degree is a souffle; the usual means is to mix whipped white of eggs into a pasty prepar...
-Soups Of Veal - Sponge Cake
Soups Of Veal Veal Soup A L'Indienne A veal curry or mulligatawny, pieces of meat in the soup, and rice. Veal Soup A La Poissy White, creamy thickened veal stock with vermi...
-Sprat - St. Honore Cake
Sprat A small sea-fish, in appearance something like a sardine; formerly supposed to be the young herring. It appears at certain seasons in English waters in, immense numbers and becomes extremely ...
-St. Pierre - Tamarind
St. Pierre Name often met with in foreign menus; it is a seafish, the John dory. Sucre (Fr) Sugar. Sucres Sweets. Succotash Indian name of a mixtur...
-Accidents
Most frequently occurring in hotels are burns, scalds and cuts. Handles come off boilers of hot water or hot fat; frying vessels full of boiling lard tip over, steam rushes out from under a lid, or ou...
-Acid
The harmless fruit acids used in cookery-are those named above (see acetic acid), obtained from fruits of the citrus family, lemons, limes, etc., the lees of wine and from vinegar. Oxalic acid is pois...
-Acid And Alkali
Acids mixed with such alkalies as soda, saleratus, potash, marble dust and lime, when wetted, begin to change into gas which rises into the atmosphere and is lost, but if the change takes place within...
-Aerated Bread
Bread charged with gas the same as generated in soda fountains. The loaves are inclosed in a tight mould, gas forced into them, and baked. In baking, the gas expanding makes the bread light. The effec...
-Albumen
White of egg is albumen in its purest form. It is abundant in the flesh of chickens, rabbits, fish, and is a constituent of all sorts of meat in a greater or less degree. When chicken meet or chopped ...
-Alcohol
Much employed formerly to burn in lamps under chafing dishes, but made too dear for general use by the revenue tax. It is in use still by persons who take pleasure in preparing special dishes over the...
-Almond
The nut is the seed of a fruit of the peach kind. There are several varieties; the bitter almond is one of them; it is used sparingly to add flavor to the sweet almonds in various preparations. A subs...
-Almond. Continued
Almond Macaroons (Soft) Light, hollow; made with a pound of sugar, one ounce corn starch, half pound crushed almonds, three whites, beaten light, baked slack on sheets of paper, taken off paper by ...
-Alum
In a powdered state has been extensively employed as an adulterant in bread; it has much the same effect as a slight tendency to sourness in the dough has in whitening the bread; it has some effect in...
-Anchovy
A little sea fish caught in the Mediterranean. It has a high flavor, is used as an appetizer and in sauces. It is preserved in salt brine; can be bought either in bottles or small kegs of one or two q...
-Aniline
The brightest coloring for confectionery. The red shades from pink to purple are perfectly harmless, and if they were not the quantity required to color is so extremely small that no injury could ensu...
-Antelope
The antelope of the western plains, being the fleetest of foot and most numerous, survives the buffalo, mountain sheep and black-tail deer and still constitutes a very considerable portion of the game...
-Antidotes
Any substances which counteract the effects of poisons. When poison has been swallowed, first and instantly dilute the poison with large draughts of warm water, either clear, or, if the particular poi...
-Ants
Small red ants overrun the safes and cupboards where eatables are kept; they are particularly troublesome by getting into sugar and syrup; they will attack a sponge cake, go all through and make an an...
-Appetizers
Appetissants, cold horsd'ceuvres, kickshaws, side dishes; these are the small things eaten as a preliminary to a good dinner, supposed to create an appetite for something more substantial, though, as ...
-Apples
Uses Of: Appleade A sort of beer made of 1/2 bushel apples, baked and mashed, 2 pounds rice boiled soft in 2 gallons water, all put in a tub having a faucet, 7 gallons boiling water and 4 pounds su...
-Apple Cobbler
Southern States' name for apple pie baked in an ordinary baking pan and cut out in squares to serve. Brown Betty A buttered pudding dish filled with alternate layers of bread crumbs, thi...
-French Apple
Pik Or Tourte Small pie plate covered with thin sheet of puff paste with thicker edges, filled with apple marmalade; baked without top crust. Apple Turnovers Rounds of rich paste cut ...
-French Apple. Part 2
Apple Jelly The Jelly-making quality of apples, varies greatly; crab apples yield the strongest and clearest; some seeding varieties, good for nothing else, make the best jelly; i pound of sugar , ...
-French Apple. Part 3
Apple Batter Pudding Pared and cored apples baked in a pan under paper cover; when done, an egg batter made with little flour poured over the apples, and baking continued. Another way is to bake a ...
-Apricots
Name is from two words signifv-ing early ripe. It is mentioned by the gardener in Shakespeare's Winter's Tale, yet only grows in England when protected by a south wall. It reaches the greatest perfe...
-Arrowroot
A pudding material like corn starch, but has a more delicate flavor of its own. Being a product of the West India islands, the powers owning them have done much to stimulate the trade in arrowroot fro...
-Artesian Wells
Holes are bored or drilled to any depth by either of two methods: A drill with a wedge-shaped steel point is raised and let fall by steam power, its own weight driving it down while it is turned part ...
-Artichoke
There are two different vegetables called artichokes, and neither of them being in general use with us there is a good deal of mystification about the directions given for using them. One, the articho...
-Asparagus
Is eaten with the fingers when cooked, whether hot or cold; for this reason asparagus on toast is dished with the heads only in the butter or sauce, the toast holding up the white ends dry. The larges...
-Aspics
Dishes of all savory sorts that are put together with aspic jelly or aspic mayonnaise, such as pieces of fish placed in order in a mould and fastened there with aspic jelly, the mould being set on ice...
-Bacon
Needs to be timed in boiling to 1/2 hour for each pound. Bacon, Broiled Thin slices broiled to a crisp over a charcoal fire. Bacon With Eggs The bacon on the dish first, an...
-Baking Powder
Cream of tartar, 30 oz.; bicarbonate of soda, 15 oz.; flour, 5 oz.; mixed. I chanced to pick up as my dinner companion one of the officers of a leading baking-powder company. Probably others will be...
-Candied Bananas
Dried bananas crystallized in sugar before quite dried out. Baked Bananas Breakfast dish; split, laid in pan with butter and sugar over, baked to a state like candy. Fried Ban...
-Barley
For cooking purposes is of two kinds or more: Scotch and pearl barley; the latter is larger grain and whiter; either kind answers for cooking; both are cheap, costing less than rice and swelling to a ...
-Bass
There are half a dozen or more kinds. Black bass, northern; black bass, southern; striped bass, rock bass, channel bass, sea bass or red fish; all regarded first-class for the table and for sport. The...
-Beans
The varieties are extremely numerous in this country, the choice sorts being Lima beans shelled green, white wax stringless beans and green string beans of successive varieties from early to late. The...
-Bear Meat
Is eaten by nearly all people where it can be obtained, although viewed with prejudice by many who meet with it for the first time. The meat is like pork, but darker; generally it is very fat. When ob...
-Beaten Biscuits
Specialty of Virginia and adjoining states. A trade journal, remarking upon the difficulty of striking anything new in the biscuit line, says: The widow of a well-known Presbyterian divine has had a ...
-Beche De Mer
The sea-slug or trepang or sea cucumber; a kind of sea caterpillar of considerable importance to the Asiatics, who eat it and trade in it dried. It is from 8 to 15 inches long and abundant on the Flor...
-Beef
The progress of the times, rapid transit, large slaughtering and packing operations, wholesale methods of preserving meat both raw and cooked, the utilization of every part for its best purpose and th...
-Beef. Continued
Bceuf Hollandaise Is smoked beef boiled. Rosbif A L'Anglaise Roast btef with Yorkshire pudding and horse-radish. Pate De Bceuf Aux Pommes De Terre A pie of minced beef a...
-How To Cook Beefsteak
It requires courage in the light of our knowledge and almost daily experience for one to assert that there is no reason why every beefsteak that is put on the table should not, so far as cooking is co...
-Beignet (Fr.) Fritter
Beignets Souffles FFritters which puff up hollow; also called aigrettes; they are a la vanille when flavored. Beignets A La Dominique Savory, made of a delicate salpicon or mince of c...
-Beets
Best for table are the blood beets; sugar beets, nearly white inside, are as good for serving in sauce hot, not so good for ornamental purposes. Favorite Ways Of Using Them: Beets In Butter...
-Bisque
A paste or puree. Potage Bisque au Riz is fish soup with crayfish tails and rice. Bisque Of Crayfish Soup of rice and crayfish, in veal broth; the crayfish partly fried with butter, onio...
-Blackberry
Uses Of: Dried Blackberries One bushel of fruit makes 10 pounds dried. Blackberry Pies Great favorite in the season. (1)-Madc by heaping the berries raw in a pie crust sugaring, and c...
-Borax And Boracic Acid
A borax valley was discovered in California, a dead valley, so-called, or alkali tract, in which was no life; and this proved to be a great, indeed an inexhaustible deposit of borax, and a company was...
-Borated Fish
That is, fish preserved by the boracic acid process, are being sent freely into our markets by the Norwegian curers, and are found to be without taint or sign of putrefaction, while the flavor is by n...
-Bordelaise Cookery
Bordeaux has long been renowned as the headquarters of good cheer. Paris may have boasted of a larger number of first-class restaurants, but the best cooks have come from Bordeaux and neighboring town...
-Bordure [En] (Fr)
Dishes that are served up by making on the platter a border of mashed potato, rice, fine hominy, Jerusalem artichoke, or any such material, and filling the inside with the meat prepared for it, are of...
-Boudins (Fr)
Puddings of meat. Boudin Noir Blood pudding or sausage. Boudin Blanc White pudding or sausage of veal, bread, etc. Boudins A La Richelieu This kind of hot, wh...
-Bouillabaisse
The provencal fish-stew; is not a very formidable dish to prepare. The cooks of various hotels and restaurants in the southern sea-coast towns of the United States make it two or three times a week as...
-Brains
The brains of all domestic animals are eaten and considered a luxury. The brains of ostriches and peacocks were among the rare and costly delicacies at the famous banquets of the ancients. Nearly all ...
-Buns
A bun is a sweet roll, raised with yeast like ordinary bread, though there are at least a score of different names, shapes and qualities, and quite a number of people follow the Scotch fashion of call...
-Butter Imitations
A number of patents have been taken out for making artificial butter, or imitations. The first was by a French chemist, Ilippolyte Mege, in 1870. He was employed on the Imperial farm at Yincennes, and...
-Cabbage
Most ancient of vegetables used for food and still popular; classed among the most nutritious, containing nitrogen, the same as meat, which causes its strong odor. Odor Of Boiling Cabbage ...
-Cafe (Fr)
Coffee; also coffee house. Cafe Au Lait Boiled milk and coffee in equal parts, little cream. Cafe Noir Strongest black coffee, and sugar to taste. Cafe Gloria ...
-Calf's Ears
Are cooked separate from the head in various ways. Oreilles De Veau Farcis Calf's ears first boiled tender, stuffed with any savory stuffing of minced bacon, onions and bread, or sausage...
-Calf's Head
It is useless if skinned as many country butchers send it in after, perhaps, repeated requests. The head can be cleaned by scalding, same as a pig, and scraping. A little lye, ashes or soda in the wat...
-Canapes
Literally couches, sofas, but in culinary language pieces of toast or bread with something spread upon them. Canapes Aux Anchois Chopped anchovies and eggs on fried bread. Can...
-Canned Goods
There is the utmost need for the hotel buyer to post himself early on the subject of canned goods. The margins are sometimes as great in proportion to prices as in the case of wines. Some merchants wi...
-Canton Ginger
Preserved ginger root, a sort of candy; especially valuable in fruit ice-creams, ginger-ice, tutti-frutti, choice small cakes, steamed puddings and wherever citron is used. It has an agreeable pungenc...
-Canvas Back Duck
Mr. Dion Bouci-cault recently sent Mr. Irving a present of American dainties, which where served at some supper parties which have been given in the beefsteak room at the Lyceum after the performance...
-Car Carafes Frappees
Those who know the French capital will readily recall the delightfully refreshing and almost picturesque appearance along the Boulevards of innumerable balls of what appears to be frozen snow in eleg...
-Careme
A name often met with in the literature of epicurism. It is necessary to a polite education to know something about a name so prominent. Careme was an original genius who happened to be a cook, had th...
-Cardoon
Imported vegetable; uncommon; Spanish thistle heads. The stalks of the inner leaves are the parts eaten. Cardons A L'Espagnole Freed from the soft stalks, and prickly edges rubbed off wi...
-Carrots
Necessary for soups and in stock for sauces; not in much demand as a vegetable in this country. In England nearly always served with boiled salt beef. Carrots In Cream Young carrots scra...
-Carp
Fresh -water fish; second-rate in quality, yet has received much attention from the cooks because perhaps of its good shape to serve whole. In season from October to June. Baked Carp The...
-Cassoulet De Toulouse
To-day let me merely mention the various ingredients that enter into the composition of Cassoulet de Toulouse, as given me by the amiable chef of the Cafe Voltaire: White beans, real Aries sausage, f...
-Catfish
The catfish in the United States occupies the same ambiguous position as the conger-eel in England; both are good food and both are subjects of prejudice. The catfish furnishes too much good meat to t...
-Cauliflower
Grows to perfection in some parts of this country, where the winters are mild and moist, but is a rarity in the corn belt. Florida, Utah and California send shipments of cauliflower to all other secti...
-Caviare
A relish or appetizer popular and fashionable everywhere more than in the United States. It appears in the majority of foreign menus whenever the hors d'ceuvres are named separately. Can be bought in ...
-Celery
An article of necessity now for every good dinner or supper in the winter and spring. Is thought not to have the delicate crispness so much esteemed until after frost. It should be kept in ice water f...
-Cepes
These are large or flap mushrooms, obtainable in cans put up in oil something after the manner of sardines. They have the mushroom-flavor strong and decided, which is only faint in the canned champi...
-Champagne
A wine accidentally discovered by a good Benedictine monk, named Dom Perignon, in or about the year 1688. (See -wines for times to serve, etc). Sweet Dry Champagne It is for the interest...
-Chantilly Cream
Whipped cream; common thick cream; possibly it may have meant at first clotted cream. French royalty had a country residence at Chantilly about the time our present culinary terms were in course of fo...
-Chartreuse
A liqueur invented by the monks of Chartreuse. Can be bought of liquor merchants, as well as maraschino, etc.; is used by pastry cooks in ices and creams. There are four varieties of the liqueur menti...
-Chartreuse A La Mikado
Forcemeat of chicken, highly seasoned with aromatic salt, is filled into rings of sliced cooked carrots and beets, dipped in jelly and a mould lined' with them; filled up with chicken and green peas i...
-Chaudfroid (Fr)
Literally hot-cold. The term has a definite meaning in cookery, being the name of a certain sort of jellied sauce; still it is one of the odd names which the French themselves cannot give a reason for...
-Cheese
Served in small squares and almost invariably eaten with the fingers. The last course of a dinner, but often in the form of canapes and other made dishes, appearing as well among the hot hors d'otuvre...
-Cherries
For hotel use the cherries ready-stoned should be bought; they are solid fruit and serviceable, and otherwise cherries are seldom pitted and pies not good. White California-cherries are a luxury for s...
-Chestnuts
There are two sorts; the small kind are too tedious peeling to be of much use in cooking; the large ones are known as Italian. They are good food when cooked; can be made up in many ways. The best swe...
-Chestnut Forcemeat
That which is named in the bills of fare as puree de marrons, and is often m:de of sweet potatoes. If made genuine, it is pounded chestnuts, butter, bread crumbs, grated ham, onion, lemon rind, eg...
-Chicory
Green salad; endive; curled endive; succory. There are two or three varieties, not more different than varieties of lettuces. Chicory With Gravy Chicory cooked like spinach or greens. ...
-Chicken Recipes
In the United States chicken is the name commonly applied to fowls of any age, the word fowl being but seldom used; and this practice has been so extended that it takes in prairie chickens and guin...
-Chicken Recipes. Part 2
Fillet Of Chicken A La Dauphine Breasts of chickens laid open, forcemeat inclosed, rolled up, covered with pork slices, simmered in butter and broth, dished on shape of fried bread; truffle sauce. ...
-Chicken Recipes. Part 3
Filets De Volaille A L'Avbassadrice Breasts sliced, forcemeat spread, smoothed, shaped, egged over, half of them covered with chopped truffles and breadcrumbs, others with chopped ham and breadcrum...
-Chicken Recipes. Part 4
Bocbixs De Volaille A La Lucullus Quenelles of chicken with truffle puree in the center of each; served in an ornamental crous-tade with Allemande sauce. Chicken Croquettes A L'Itali...
-Chicken Recipes. Part 5
Poulet A La Boivin Specialty of a French restaurant. Chicken cut up, browned in a pan with butter, button onions, potato balls (scooped out of raw potatoes); seasoned; finished by baking in the ove...
-Chicken Recipes. Part 6
Chickens In Bechamel Joints of chicken cut up after boiling, and bones taken out; in cream sauce; minced parsley on top; truffles around. Souffle De Gelen'Ottes A L'Essence De Truffe...
-Chinese Cookery
The Chinese have established restaurants in New York and San Francisco, and have been with their methods and materials on exhibition in London. In the former places they are at their best in a busines...
-Chinese Cookery. Continued
Menus Of Fifty Courses Dinners that begin with candied fruits, and close with delicate soups and crystallized flowers; delicacies from Corea, Japan, Tonquin and Manchooria; liqueurs such as no chem...
-Chinese Sweets
Amongst these, fried and candied potato chips and the nuts or seed of the Sacred Lotus a la Helian-thus, whatever that may mean. These nuts are white and soft, not unlike filberts in flavor. Bech-de...
-Coironne Au Chocolat
A crown or border mould of chocolate Bavarian, the interior filled with whipped cream, garnished with crystalized fruits. Souffle Au Chocolat Chocolate, sugar, flour, cream and yolks bea...
-Chops
All the slices of mutton that can be cut on both sides of the spine bone from the neck to the hip. The first choice are the rib chops, the shortened ribs giving an advantageous shape; the loin chops a...
-Chowder
Fish chowder is an ancient dish which has undergone alleged improvements. It is, originally, a sailors' stew, consisting only of fat salt pork, onions, potatoes, crackers, water, salt and pepper; stew...
-Cider
The pure, unsophisticated juice of the apple, fermented and matured to a certain degree. Where the highest quality is desired, as for champagne cider, the fruit is crushed between granite rollers to a...
-Cinnamon And Cassia
The government chemists, investigating the adulterations of food, say: These spices are the barks of several species of the geniis cinnamonum, the true cinnamon being a native of Ceylon, where it is ...
-Clams
The late Sam Ward could probably have named a dozen different ways of cooking the delicious bivalve - for a clam is a bivalve - and would have named Chateau Yquem as the wine to take with clams. The m...
-Cocoa
It is certain that the Spanish discoverers Pizarro and Cortes learned its use in the Court of Montezuma, and they doubtless brought a knowledge of this nutritious nut into Europe. Cocoa (or more prope...
-Cocoanut
The fruit of the cocoa-palm. Since the introduction of the desiccated cocoanut the uses have increased to an astonishing degree. Cocoanut Pie Or Pudding Fresh grated cocoa-nut, butter, s...
-Cod
Is in season every month in the year; is at its best in mid-winter. The head and shoulders are considered the best parts and are generally boiled; the thinner parts being sliced and fried. ...
-Coffee Quotations
For menus: Coffee! O coffee! Faith, it is surprising, 'Mid all the poets, good and bad and worse, Who've scribbled (Flock and China eulogizing) Post and papvrus with 'immortal verse' - Melodiously si...
-Coffee Quotations. Part 2
Coffee And The Koran Coffee advanced rapidly from the Red Sea and the Nile to Syria, and from Asia Minor to Constantinople, where the first coffee-house was opened in 1554, and soon called forth a...
-Coffee Quotations. Part 3
French Coffee See cafe and drinks. Turkish Coffee To make Turkish coffee you need a mill, which grinds the coffee to a very fine powder; when the water is boiling, add a sufficiency ...
-Colorings
Red Cochineal, 1 oz.,. pounded fine in a mortar, 1/2pt. water, 1/2 oz. salts of wormwood; boiled 1 minute; 3/4 oz. cream tartar, little powdered alum, strained, little sugar added to keep it. ...
-Deleterious Colorings
A Philadelphia society for the prevention of adulteration, has sent out a list of 35 poisonous colorings, with their common and also their chemical names, warning bakers and confectioners not to use t...
-Compotes
Fruits stewed in syrup so as to keep the original shape, not broken. Compote Of Pears Pears pared, but not divided, simmered in porcelain kettle with water to cover; dipped out, syrup ma...
-Conger Eel
A very large species, as much larger than the common eel as a fowl is larger than a partridge. A prejudice against eating it exists in some localities, as is the case with our catfish, but not everywh...
-Consommes
Clear soups. Made by preparing a soup as to strength and flavorings complete, but generally without any thickening ingredients; straining it, adding chopped lean raw meat and white of eggs, and boilin...
-Consommes. Part 2
Consomme Au Tapioca Clear soup with tapioca previously washed and steeped in cold water, drained and simmered in the consomme until transparent. Consomme A La Royale Clear light-brown...
-Consommes. Part 3
Consomme A La Kursel Clear soup with spring vegetables, peas, asparagus-heads and shred lettuce. Consomme Printaniere Springsoup; clear with early summer vegetables, especially peas a...
-Cordon Bleu
A cook of the first order; generally, however, applied to first-class female cooks. The name has reference to the order of the blue ribbon instituted by one of the French kings. King Louis XV had amo...
-Corn
In the United States it is Indian corn or maize; in England corn means all grains that are used for making bread; wheat, oats, barley and rye are all corn over there, and Indian corn is maize. ...
-Corn Starch
Obtained by steeping crushed maize in water and pressing it through straining material into troughs of water. Starch will not dissolve in cold water, but settles at the bottom. Corn Starch ...
-Cotton Seed Oil
This must be counted now among the important food products of the United States; it is produced in immense and constantly increasing quantities. The government commissioners report: Refined cotton-se...
-Crab
There are several varieties of edible or marketable crabs, besides a good many that are merely natural curiosities. The smallest is the Oyster Crab, found living in the same shell with the oyster, and...
-Crabs A L'Americaine
The meat picked out from 4 dozen crabs, drained, 2 raw yolks added, salt, cayenne, little chopped parsley, 2 tablespoons bread crumbs; made into balls or croquettes; breaded and fried. Hot ...
-Crawfish
I wonder when the moderr caterer and book-writer, as well as the fishmonger, who ought to know better, will cease to stumble between the Scylla and Charybdis of cray and craw lish. The former is a sm...
-Crayfish
There are two or more kinds; the river or fresh-water crayfish, which may be found in any shallow creek or brook where cresses grow; it is used for fish bait, but never thought of as an article of die...
-Cream
A new process has been invented recently for separating cream from milk mechanically; the appliance is called Laval's separator. This contrivance has quite revolutionized the ordinary round of opera...
-Cremes (Fr)
Creams. Bavarian creams. A class of gelatinized cream compounds; a more elaborate sort of blanc-mange, whipped while setting on ice to make it spongy and delicate. Creme A La Bavaroise W...
-Crepe (Fr)
Pancake. But if the pancake is an honored institution with us, it is much more so en the Continent. There, across the 'silverstreak,' but more especially in the Latin countries, the crepe is adored ...
-Crevettes Bouquets
A corespondence was going on some time ago in the pages of the World, between Theoc, the Parisian correspondent of that journal, and another, as to the French for ' prawn.' Theoc stated, and rightly,...
-Croquettes
The word signifies something crisp. Croquettes are balls or any shape of almost any eatable thing, floured or bread-crumbed and fried in plenty of hot fat, then drained on paper. Chicken Cr...
-Crystallized Fruits
The process is quite simple. The theory is to extract the juice from the fruit and replace it with sugar-syrup, which, upon hardening, preserves the fruit from decay and, at the same time, retains th...
-Fried Cucumbers
Cut in slices, wiped dry, floured, fried in hot fat, salted, peppered. Cucumber And Eggs The cucumber in slices, floured, simmered in stock with parsley and lumps of sugar 15 minutes; 2 ...
-Curry Powder
A yellow powder, of which the principal ingredient is turmeric, a species of ginger; used as a high seasoning for stews and all dishes a VIndienne. It can be purchased everywhere, ready-prepared in bo...
-Curry Quotations
For menus: When you talk of Ceylon and the picturesque city of Colombo and the ancient city of Kandy, your thoughts naturally revert to curry. The prawn curry of the Grand Oriental Hotel in the old D...
-Cussy (De)
A name often met with in relation to gastronomieal subjects. The Marquis de Cussy was a notable man enough in his day. It was he who was escorting the Empress Marie Louise back to Vienna when at Parm...
-CL'staud
A mixture of milk and eggs, cooked only to boiling point, generally with sugar and flavorings added. The standard role is 8 eggs to 1 qt. milk and 6 oz. sugar; but custard is made with 4 eggs to a qua...
-Cuttle Fish
The octopus, or devil-fish. Next to whales, probably the most bulky animals in the sea are the gigantic cuttle-fishes, with which we have recently become acquainted. Of the largest of these the body...
-Decoration
A few days ago I saw a beautiful exception, which combined simplicity with grace and artistic effect: it was a ham glazed in the usual manner, but decorated only with a large spray of imitation lilie...
-Drinks
Stewards and caterers have to provide for parties: Ale Cup Made of 2 qts. ale, 1 pt gin, 3 oz. brown sugar, 3 yolks, ground ginger, cinna mon, nutmeg, yolks, etc.; beaten; hot ale poured...
-Drinks. Part 2
Gin Sling Half pint tumbler filled with ice, 1 lemon-glass plain syrup; juice of 1/2 lemon, 1/2 glass gin; filled up with soda; slices lemon and orange on top; straws. Gin Cocktail Tu...
-Drinks. Part 3
Brandy Champerelle One wine-glass each curacao, brandy and bitters, with shaved ice. Port Negus One bottle port, peel of 1 lemon, 2 crushed cloves, grated nutmeg, sugar to taste, 1 qt...
-Drinks. Part 4
Brandy Punch One-half pint water with 3/4 lb. sugar, peel of 2 lemons, little cinnamon, nutmeg, mace, cloves; all simmered, strained, and 1 bottle brandy, juice of 2 lemons, very hot; set on fire i...
-Drinks. Part 5
The Maitrank Gernian specialty. A good-sized bunch of woodruff leaves in a bowl, with a bottle of still hock steeped an hour, 2 or 3 oranges sliced in, 1 liqueur-glass each chartreuse, maraschino a...
-Duck
Toulouse Duck As every restaurant of any note in Paris, so does every town in France, pique itself on some particular dish. So it is that the citizens of the different towns temporarily located in...
-Duck. Continued
Stewed Duck And Turnips Whole duck browned in butter, cut turnips fried in same butter; thin sauce made in the pan with herbs and seasonings, dnck simmered in till tender; served with the turnips a...
-Eels
Found in sluggish streams and mill ponds; plentiful in countries where the farms are d i -vided by dykes or ditches and where ponds abound; but not in general use in this country. Linlithgo...
-Eggs
Though many, I own, are the evils they've brought us, And royalty's here on her very last legs, Yet who can help loving the nation that taught us Six hundred and eighty-five ways to dress eggs! Tha...
-Eggs. Part 2
Rock Work, Oeufs A La Niege Snow eggs with custard; made by separating eggs, making a yellow custard with the yolks, whipping the whites firm with little sugar, and poaching by dropping spoonfuls i...
-Eggs. Part 3
Devilled Eggs Hard-boiled eggs cut in halves; the yolks pounded with potted (devilled) ham, pepper, mustard and oil, or butter, and lemon juice; put back in whiter; served with salad. Em...
-Eggs. Part 4
Oeufs Au Beurre Noir Eggs dropped into butter which froths and turns brown while frying; sprinkled with chili and tarragon vinegar; served on toast. Oeufs Poches Au Jus Poached egs in...
-Eggs. Part 5
Oeufs En Volauvent Puff-paste shell filled with slices of egg in rich cream sauce. Egg Patties Small patty cases of puff paste (petits vols-au-vents), the inside remainder of paste re...
-Eggs. Part 6
Egg Pudding A La Milanaise Sliced hard eggs in a pudding dish, a custard with salt and pepper poured over, grated cheese on top; baked till set. Paupiettes Ok Eggs Minced hard eggs hi...
-Eggs. Part 7
Oeufs En Aspic Sliced hard-boiled eggs ornamentally set in a mould of aspic jelly, turned out on a border of salad. Oeufs Au Tomate Hard-boiled, the whites cut in strips in tomato sau...
-Egg Preservation
Drying eggs in the form of grains of powder has proved practicable but scarcely yet commercially successful, probably through the fear of the public that spoiled eggs may be concealed in the preparati...
-Egg Plant
The aubergine fruit; deep purple, almost black outside; egg-shaped, size from that of a pint cup to three times that bulk; plentiful and cheap in the markets; most at home in the South. Egg...
-Elderberry
The elder grows by the side of creeks almost everywhere; the berries attain a somewhat larger size and juicier condition, however, in cool summer climates. Elderberry Syrup The expressed...
-Epigram Me
Said to be from epigast, the lower part of the breast, but here is a different explanation: In the days when French tax farmers were as remarkable for their ignorance as for their wealth, a gentlema...
-Farina
Pudding material made from wheat; it is like sifted corn-meal to the touch. There are two kinds, one being Graham farina, which is used principally for making mush or porridge for breakfast or supper;...
-Figs
Fresh figs are plentiful in Florida and the Gulf states, and are served as breakfast and dessert fruit with cream; are used in pies and tarts, mixed with lemon juice; are best, perhaps, in preserves w...
-Filbert
Well-known nut of the hazelnut kind;'served at dessert either with nut-crackers or, if that is not convenient, the nuts ready cracked before being served in the baskets. Filbert Soup I ...
-Fillet
A strip or band of meat without bone. Fillet Of Beef The tenderloin entire, also in steaks or slices (small fillets, filets mignons); it is the undercut of the sirloin, the long band of ...
-Fish Quotations
For menus: Fish is no less important to a good dinner than soup. There is an Oriental proverb, to the effect that 'your Arab despises fish,' which as the Arabs dwell where fish are not, is equivalen...
-Fish Recipes
Fish Stew The meat being cut from the bones of any kind of fish, the bones.heads and tails are boiled in water with onion and any kind of herb or vegetable seasonings to make a fish broth or cullis...
-Foiegras
Fat liver; especially designating the livers of fat geese; a comestible of great prominence on all sides of French cookery; but, as in the case of high-flavored cheese, herbs, spices, curry, etc., the...
-Charles Elme Francatelli
An English chef, author of an important culinary work. He Was A Pupil Of Careme And Saw That Great Artist Deriving A Large Income As Well As Much Fame From His Published Cook Books, Which Were, Howeve...
-Frogs
The frog is one of the regular kinds of meat now kept in stock in all good restaurants during the season, which is fall and winter. The legs are eaten of two kinds or more: the small green marsh frog,...
-Galantine
A fowl or other kind of meat, stuffed, boiled, pressed in a mould, decorated, eaten cold. Galantine De Dinde Boned (or boneless) turkey. A slit is cut down the back, the meat carefully c...
-Game
Nearly all game is better for being kept, quails, snipe and woodcock being the exceptions. It has been the rule to hang some game birds by the middle feather of the tail and cook the bird when it fell...
-Game. Continued
Weights And Time The average weight of grouse, partridges, and pheasants, when prepared for the spit, is as fol -lows: Grouse, 16 oz.; partridge, 3/4 lb.; pheasant (on the average), 2 1/2 lbs. The...
-Garbure
I remember some time ago six American gentlemen from New York came to Big-non's and said: 'Now, Joseph, we want a thoroughly good dinner.' I asked them what they wanted, and they insisted on leaving ...
-Gargantua
Rabelais, a French humorous satirist of the sixteenth century, describes the doings of Gargantua, who ate cattle as common people eat chickens and was in all a wonderful glutton; hence the allusions o...
-Gateau - (Fr)
Cake. The forms of gateaux are as various as the forms of cakes. The term means almost anything from a cream pie to an ornamented tall cake for a party. Gateau Baba A La Montmorency A ri...
-Gelatine
Made first by Prevost about 1735, the same who took in partnership Phillippe, who afterwards became celebrated for his restaurant in Paris. It is refined glue; may be obtained by boiling down calves' ...
-Genoise Cake
Rich almond pound-cake of several grades. (1)-Made of 1 lb. each sugar, butter, almonds, flour, eggs, and a wine-glass of brandy. The sugar and eggs whisked together until thick and light; the almonds...
-German Cookery
To appreciate German cookery and to enjoy thoroughly some of the real delicacies it produces, it is necessary first to abandon all American ideas on the fitness of things, and when you have succeeded ...
-German Dishes
These are dishes which one traveler did not relish and he thought them strange, though they seemed good to his German entertainers: Cold potato salad, boiled beef and raspberry jam, spinach fried in b...
-German Dishes. Part 2
Krammetsvogel Another not so substantial but tasty dish is that of Krammetsvogel, which we call the field-fare. This little bird, roasted and served upon buttered toast, is in taste by no means di...
-German Dishes. Part 3
Klosse Can be made of any kind of meat mixed with soaked biead-crumbs and seasoning, either boiled or fried, served in soup, or with meat-stews or alone; should be sent to table hot and light as so...
-Gigot (Fr)
Leg or ham; especially a leg of mutton. Gigot Ron Roast leg of mutton. Gigot Bouilli Aux Capres Boiled leg of mutton; caper sauce. Gigot A La Polonaise Leg of...
-Ginger
The root of a reed-like plant with annual leafy stems 3 to 4 feet high. Cultivated in warm countries; does not grow wild. The common brown ginger-root is in its natural state; the white, known as Jama...
-Glaze
It is what remains when meat liquor is boiled down till nearly dry; it is extract of meat; it is meat gravy dried down thick enough to set solid when cold. It is improved by the cooks by flavorings of...
-Glace De Viande
One of the last authorities on the dying art of cookery in France, the last eloquent writer thereupon, the Marquis de Cherville, published a few days ago a learned article on Dumas pere from the gast...
-Glucose
Grape sugar or the kind of sugar that will not granulate. The recent discoveries of methods of making it abundantly have had B great effect upon the confectionery trade, glucose being but about half t...
-Goose
A dinner was given one day not long ago to WiUiam M. Evarts, the American lawyer, who is a great epicure. One of the courses, roast stuffed goose, seemed especially to please the palate of the learne...
-Goose. Continued
Goose And Swan It is a curious illustration of the de gustibus non est disputandum, that the ancients considered the swan as a high delicacy and abstained from the flesh of the goose as impure and ...
-Gooseberry
A fruit of but little consequence in the United States; most congenial to cool and moist climates; very prominent among English fruits. Gooseberry Champagne A good trade is being done in...
-Gourmet And Gourmand
There are two broad varieties in French lovers of eating - the gourmets and the gourmands. The difference between them is so great that they may be considered as complete opposites. The gourmand is a...
-Grapes
Among the best of fruits to serve for breakfast and always welcome at dinner. TheCon-cord grape is the staple variety available in this country, and taking it altogether it is the best, for while ther...
-Greek Cookery Llqueurs
Drink liqueurs and not spirits straight. Rati is the liqueur preferred, and that made in Cluos is considered the best. Absinthe, chartreuse, maraschino and the other liqueurs almost universally employ...
-Greek Vegetables
Stuffed artichokes, stuffed tomatoes, stuffed cucumbers, egg plant and vegetable marrows. Fillet Of Beef A L'Athenienne In the Athens style it is larded, roasted or baked, surrounded wit...
-Grimod De La Reyniere
A name attached to several modern French dishes, has reference to a notable patron of culinary art, contemporary with De Cussy, CariSme, and Brillat-Savarin: Grimond de la Reyniere came of a banking ...
-Grissint Bread
A Boston paper says that the technical name for those long sticks of bread, such as are served at the Parker House, which one finds it so entertaining to nibble upon between courses, is Grissini, the...
-Grouse
Prairie chickens; spruce grouse, ruffed grouse, pin-tail grouse, moor-fowl, and other kinds; larger than a partridge. Grouse A La Rob Roy Alexis Soyer, the famous Reform Club chef, besto...
-Gumbo Soup
A specialty of the southern states; Creole dish; soup thickened and flavored with okra or gumbo, either in its green state or dried and powdered. Chicken Gumbo A La Creole Pieces of chic...
-Gum
Four or five kinds of gum are used In confectionery and syrups. Gum Syrup The Frenchman who asks for absinthe in your establishment probably asks for gcmme. This means that he wants abou...
-Haddock
Well-known sea fish, nearly resembling the cod; of smaller size, however, and marked with black thumb spots on the shoulders, whence the legend that this is the fish which the apostle took up and foun...
-Halibut
Flat fish of the turbot family; reaches a very large size, sometimes weighing as much as 100 lbs. It is commonly cut into steaks. Halibut is sometimes offered for turbot, which is a dearer fish, but i...
-Ham
The Ham Fair Every spring is held, on the Boulevard Richard Lenoir, at Paris, the ham fair, which fills the air with the odor of bacon. A double row of booths runs along the boulevard. Between bouq...
-Ham. Continued
Prize Ham Curing The following is the method of curing hams that received the prize at a New England fair: To every hundred pounds of meat take eight pounds of salt, two ounces of saltpetre, two po...
-Hare
Hares are not found in the United States, unless it be in California, but a great many come to our markets both from England and Canada, and their peculiar gamy flavor renders them generally great fav...
-Herring
There is a fresh water herring abundant in Lake Superior; its fins however show it to be allied to the salmon family; it is white fleshed and the fillets are boneless, like brook trout. The Sea Herrin...
-Hominy
Is grains of Indian corn freed from the outer covering of bran, and therefore is white. There arc three or four different grades as to size, from the coarse hominy, as large as peas down to the white ...
-Honey
Buyers and consumers of honey will do well to note that the suspiciously light and bright product, variously labelled Californian Honey Dew, Swiss Table Honey, etc., etc., is frequently a sophist...
-Horseradish
The root of a coarse-looking large-leaved plant which once rooted in a garden corner grows and spreads year after year without much attention. The plentiful time for it'is in spring, when the roots ar...
-Hot Brews
Various hot drinks. Cardinal Hot spiced port and burgundy mixed with water according to taste. Bishop Hot spiced burgundy with roasted crab-apples floating in it - obvious...
-Hot Pot
A thousand hot-pots (made of 4,000 lbs. of meat and 10,000 lbs. of potatoes) were distributed from the bakeries of Liverpool amongst the poor of that city at Christmastide. Each hot-pot was supposed...
-Ice
In New York the daily consumption of ice in the summer months amounts to upwards of 10,000 tons. At the proper hour you may walk down a street and see upon every door-step a lump of ice varying in siz...
-Ices
Frozen sweets of all kinds, particularly water ices and cream ices, or sherbets and ice creams. Sorbet A L'Imperiale A new form of ice, to be served in ice-cups between the courses; flav...
-Ices. Part 2
Neapolitan Sorbetto Some of you make the best ices in the world, of which I have had practical experience. But why is it that it is impossible to get the Neapolitan sorbetto, which is something be...
-Ices. Part 3
Creme De Groseilles Currant ice-cream. Creme De Cerises Cherry ice-cream. Creme De Raisins Grape ice-cream. Creme D'Ananas Pineapple ice-cream. ...
-Icing
Is of several kinds. Water Icing Fine powdered sugar wetted with water, and flavored, and spread over the surface of the cake. It is of a pearly, semi-transparent appearance, and does no...
-Italian Cookery
As the spit and gridiron are specialities of the English kitchen, so the frying-pan is the speciality of the Italian cook; and, as England has taught the world to roast, so Italy has taught the world ...
-Italian Cookery. Part 2
Roman Fry Shops In Rome there are frying shops as close together as public houses in London.and there persons who may not have the necessaries to cook at home - as those who live in a poor lodging-...
-Italian Cookery. Part 3
Cotelette Milanaise In an Italian restaurant we recently came across a table specialty which may be recommended as an appetizing entree. We refer to cotelette Milanaise with curry sauce. The ordin...
-Noques
Italian-paste dumplings; equivalent to the German klose - made of equal weights of eggs, butter, and flour worked together, dropped by spoonfuls in boiling water; eaten with grated cheese and butter, ...
-Italian Warehouse
The Italian ware house, first established in London in the reign of Charles II, is an institution peculiar to the British Metropolis. In the last century, when a gentleman went to Italy, he generally...
-Jam
Fruit stewed down with sugar; applied to mashed fruit. The fruit stewed down without breaking up the shape is called preserves. All fruits are reduced to jam except the orange which has a name to itse...
-Japanese Cookery
The natives eat little flesh. Only since the advent of foreigners have they learned to eat any at all. Their sustenance is drawn mostly from rice, sweet potatoes, fish and a few vegetables, such as a ...
-Jelly
Table jellies are made of gelatine, sugar, flavorings, and either water and fruit juice or water and wine. Rule: 1 qt. water or juice, 1 1/2 oz. gelatine, 2 lemons, 8 oz. sugar, all boiled together, t...
-Imitation Jellies
Made of (1) 1 pt. water, 1/4 oz. pulverized alum, boiled a minute or two, 4 lbs. white sugar, boiled a short time, strained, colored variously, flavored with oils or essences to imitate fruit jellies....
-Jewish Cookery
While the Jews do not excel in high-class cookery, perhaps on account of their restrictions in regard to materials, what they have is essentially good and of a wholesome character. The religion of the...
-Jewish Cookery. Part 2
Jewish Butcher's Meat An extra supply of kosher meat is required at the Passover season, and the Jewish butchers' shops look like our butchers' shops at Christmas. The Shochet The man...
-Jewish Cookery. Part 3
Chorissa Jewish sausage; is prepared by the Jewish butchers; is boiled and braised, served with rice. Passover Fritters Motsa meal (cracker dust) eggs and little sugar worked to a sti...
-John Dory
Jean Dore Or Saint Pierre A sea-fish common in French and English markets, of singular appearance and excellent quality. On the Brittany coast, crabs, dorys, mullets, and fifty other varieties are...
-Kid
Young kid is as freely purchased and eaten in some sections of this country as young lamb and is as good. It is often, however, sold for lamb, which is a fraud on the buyer. To Know Kid Fro...
-Kidneys
Mutton kidneys are a great breakfast specialty-in England; grilled kidneys are only prevented from being as universally served as the national eggs and bacon by their dearness;the demand is always gre...
-Kitchen Of The Pharaohs
Nothing is more curious and interesting- in that remarkable discovery lately made by Mr. Flinders Petrie in the loneliest and dreariest corner of the north-eastern Delta, where he has actually uneart...
-Koumiss
Fermented milk. This is a regular article of sale in the large cities. The taste is much like buttermilk. Some like it as a beverage, others drink it for their health. At the drug stores where sold it...
-Lager Beer
The annual manufacture of beer in this country is about 19,000,000 barrels. Counting 1,000 glasses to a barrel, no extravagant estimate, we have about 3S0 glasses per annum to every inhabitant of the ...
-Lamb
Lamb is the favorite meat of the Greeks and Turks. It is more exquisitely dressed in the Turkish kitchen than in that of any other country. Roast Lamb In a dripping pan dashed with boili...
-Lamb. Continued
Cotelettes D'Agneau A La Duchesse Spread over with Duxelles sauce, made cold, breaded, fried; served on a border or puree of green peas with mixed vegetables in white sauce in the center. ...
-Larks And Lark Pies
The common lark, which is called in Paris mauvielle, is generally looked upon as a wholesome, delicate, and light game. It is dressed in various ways; and the gourmets appreciate the value of the exce...
-Lemon
Nearly everything in the sweet line is flavored with lemon sometimes, and lemon cream, lemon pudding, lemon cake, etc., have no definite form otherwise. Lemon Soup Chicken broth thickene...
-Lettuce
Lettuce is not much cooked in this country and when cooked it is not much better than a cabbage; but when raw, and eaten in salad, it has a peculiarly pieasant taste; and has a sedative action upon ...
-Lime
A small kind of lemon, plentiful in the markets, used in many of the same ways as lemons; served with oysters, used in making bar drinks. It is pale-colored, thin-skinned, more acid and juicy than the...
-Liver
Calf's liver is much sought after for restaurant trade, and the butchers seldom have any for casual buyers; it is much better than any other, though beef liver is not bad. Pig's liver is next best; sh...
-Lobster
On the French coast a lobster is boiled in half milk and half water. The Cardinal of the Sea is also cooked in a court bouillon, made of a handful of salt in the water, a pat of butter, a bunch of p...
-Lobster. Continued
Coquille De Homard Lobster in the shell; scalloped lobster made by cutting the meat of cooked lobster small, putting it in a yellow sauce containing onions, wine, yolks, etc., filling plated scallo...
-Loss Of Weight
Chickens lose one third their weight in boiling and one third more in picking from the bones and mincing. 4 1/2 raw chicken yields only 1 1/2clear meat for salad. The result of a set of experiments w...
-Macaroni
There is American macaroni that usually comes loose in the large boxes, and some of it is as good as the imported; it should be tried, however, a small quantity first, for poor macaroni dissolves in t...
-Macaroni A L'Italienne
With brown gravy, butter and cheese. Macaroni With Tomatoes Macaroni mixed with cheese and butter, tomato sauce poured over; simmered in the oven covered with buttered paper; served with...
-Macaroons
Small drop-cakes made principally of sugar and almonds; but there are various kinds. (/) One pound flour, 1/4 lb. butter, 1 lb. pounded sugar, 3 eggs, 10 drops of any essence, 1/2 teaspoonful ammonia;...
-Mackerel
Choice fish plentiful on both sides the Atlantic. Says Grimod de la Reyniere: The mackerel has this in common with good women - he is loved by all the world, he is welcomed by rich and poor with the s...
-Malt
The baker who makes his own yeast uses malt perhaps twice a month to make his stock yeast, the process for which is much the same as brewing beer, though the product is very much condensed. Malt can g...
-Mango
Fruit of the West Indies, Florida, and Mexico. One of the most delicious products of the tropics is the mango, the eating of which, however, is apt at first to embarrass and perplex a stranger to no ...
-Mangosteen
Travelers in Java have filled pages and columns with rhapsodies over the mango-steen, and all unite in extolling it as the supreme delight of the tropics. The mangosteen appears to one as a hard roun...
-Marrow
Only obtained in quantity large enough to cook from the leg-bones of beef, especially the bone in the round. Marrow Toast Marrow cut thin, seasoned, laid close together upon toast, baked...
-Mead
Honey wine. In the time of King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table, the drink that was prepared for royal use was 'mead.' Mead kept its place at the tables of the rich and the great for a cons...
-Melon
Although in Europe the melon is generally eaten with salt and pepper after the soup, in this country on account of its fragrance and sweetness it is preferred between the cheese and dessert. It is s...
-Meringue
Name of the white mixture of sugar and white of egg, which in the soft form is spread over lemon pies and the like, and baked; in a firmer condition is the icing with which cakes are iced and ornament...
-Mexican Cookery
Remarks of friendly critics at the Capital. A fair sample of the dinner bill of fare served for a dollar has been presented. Here is one for half a dollar, just as taken from the table of the Gillow ...
-Mexican Cookery. Continued
Fruit For Breakfast It is a custom to precede coffee with an indulgence in fruit, which is delicious and cheap in this country and is regarded as particularly healthful at this time of day, and th...
-Milk
Skimmed Or Watered Milk To detect whether the cream has been removed to any great extent, the old form of lactometer, now more properly called a creamometer, may be used. This instrument consists s...
-Mint Sauce
Chopped green mint, vinegar and sugar; mixed and served cold. This is the sauce for cold lamb and mutton in England and France, but is eaten with hot roast lamb in this country where cold meats are no...
-Charles Monselet
The Prince of Parisian gourmets, and one of the few men on whom the mantle of Brillat-Savarin decended, has recently died. Charles Monselet was born at Nantes, and spent his early years in the shop o...
-Monkey
In Spanish Honduras the dish of honor is baked monkey, and sweeter meat you could not imagine. These monkeys live up in the branches of trees and on the vines; their feet never touch the earth benea...
-Mousse (Fr)
Moss; froth; something very light and spongy. The term is both to meat prepai -ations and to ice creams; there are mousses of foie ?ras, the softened paste having whipped cream mixed in it and then ma...
-Mullet
There are two fishes of the name, the red and gray mullet. The latter is one of the most abundant sea-fish of the southern coasts, and is cheap and but little esteemed accordingly. It is of good flavo...
-Mulligatawny
Curry soup. Also spelled mullagatawne. It derives its name from two Tamil words: molegoo, pepper, and timnee, water. Mul-ligatunny would therefore appear to be the proper spelling. Writte...
-Mushrooms
I am a mushroom enthusiast. Danger of poison? Not a bit of it. With the exercise of a little common sense there is no danger of mistaking the edible variety for those that are poisonous. All toadstoo...
-Mushrooms. Continued
A Simple Rule Make it a rule not to touch a mushroom whose lower gills are white. Mushrooms On The Gkill The smallest buttons of the real mushroom (agaricus campestris) are, as ever...
-Mussels
Bivalve shell-fish, shell about the length of a finger; nearly black, clings in clusters to rocks and wooden piles of wharves. Trade In Mussels All along the Norman coast mussel -fishin...
-Mustard
Flour made of the mixed seed of black and white mustard, deprived of its mustard oil and toned down with more or less meal or farina. To Mix Mustard Merely wet it with cold water. Epicur...
-Mutton
Liston was asked by a gentleman carving a loin of mutton: 'shall I cut itsaddlewise?' 'You had better cut it bridlewise,' replied the famous actor, 'then we shall all stand a better chance of getting...
-Mutton. Continued
Cotelettes A La Financiere Chops braised, served with financiere garnish. Cotelettes A La Nelson Chops breaded with Parmesan cheese in the crumbs, fried, served on border of mashed po...
-Napkin
The law of the napkin is but vaguely understood. One of our esteemed metropolitan contemporaries informs an eager inquirer that it is bad to fold the napkin after dinner, that the proper thing is to t...
-Nougat
Several varieties of candy. Almond Nougat, Brown Made by melting sugar by heat only, and stirring into it split almonds. Almond Nougat, White Sugar melted over the fire wit...
-Oatmeal
An article of the first necessity now in every hotel; eaten both at breakfast and supper. The rolled oats are much easier to cook than coarse oatmeal. When the latter is used it needs to be soaked in ...
-Frying Oil
There are two schools of cookery in France, as distinct from one another as the langue d'Oil is distinct from langue d'Oc. There is the kitchen of the North - and of Paris - in which butter is the pr...
-Salad Oil
Olive oil is obtained by crushing and pressing the olives in sacks, it is then subjected to refining processes. A vast quantity is produced yearly in the old countries and California is contributing l...
-Okra
Well-known American vegetable, the seed pods of a plant like a hollyock which grows from 4 to 6 feet high. There are two varieties grown for market; the best bears the short, thick, green pods which r...
-Olive
The fruit of the olive tree, formerly a special product of southern Europe, now the largest and best come from California. For hotel use olives should be bought by the keg, as glass packing, labels, e...
-Omelet
Eggs slightly beaten, cooked like a pancake in a frying pan, rolled or half turned. There is an important little secret in making these delicacies. A very clean frying pan is of course indispensable,a...
-Omelet. Continued
Omelette Aux Truffes Sliced truffles in brown sauce in the center of the omelet. Omelette Aux Epinards Spinach omelet, green color, the puree of spinach mixed with the eggs before coo...
-Onion
We give the name of onion to all the plants of the onion tribe. The leek is to us an onion, and so is garlic and the shallot. In old English the leek was the type, and garlic was but a gar-leek - a ...
-Orange
How To Eat An Orange In Florida, and many other parts of the country, the orange is cut in halves and its juice and pulp are passed to the mouth with a teaspoon. In Havana the orange is served whol...
-Orange. Continued
Orange Marmalade Oranges peeled, the peel boiled 3or4 hours, in 3 or 4 waters, till quite tender and bitterness all extracted; then shred as Cine as hay; to every dozen oranges allowed 4 lemons, an...
-Oriental Cookery
Turkish Dinner Silence and expedition are the chief characteristics of a Turkish meal. The table preparations are few, but the dishes are many; olives, caviare, cheese, etc., are dotted about, and...
-Oriental Cookery. Part 2
Sut Kebabi Pieces of the loin of mutton or lamb about the size of a guinea egg sprinkled with salt, pepper, and ground cinnamon, allowed to absorb the seasonings for 2 hours. Parboiled in milk, tak...
-Oriental Cookery. Part 3
Ra-Hat-IL-Holkum Rahat Lakoum; otherwise familiarly known in this country as Turkish Delight. Is made of 3 lbs. loaf sugar, 4 qts. water, boiled, 9 oz. starch added, boiled with constant stirring...
-Oriental Cookery. Part 4
Sikbaj A stew of sheep's heads. This is esteemed one of the greatest triumphs of cookery and the test of a cook's excellence. The heads are scraped, the ears left on and filled with flavored forcem...
-Oronge
A sort of large, flat, orange colored and delicious mushroom which grows on the bark of trees, very abundant in southern Europe. Is put up in cans in oil, like cepes. Oronges A La Bordelais...
-Ortolan
A famous luxury of ancient and modern epicures, concerning which there are more stories of reckless expenditure and extravagance told than of any other rare dainty whatever, not excepting even the tru...
-Owl
M. le Blanc was once chief cook to a Parisian nobleman. For days before Christmas he treated his guests to mouth-watering descriptions of 'ze magnifique dinnair on ze Chrisemas day in La Belle Franc...
-Oyster
Oyster Quotations For Menus The man had sure a palate covered o'er With brass or steel, that on the rocky shore First broke the oozy oyster's pearly coat, And risked the living morsel down his th...
-Oyster. Part 2
Broiled In The Shell If oysters are to be cooked, a homely excellent way is to lay the shells on the gridiron, and as soon as they open put into each a bit of butter and a dust of cayenne. The Fr...
-Oyster. Part 3
Huitres Farcies Dans Leur Coquilles Specialty mentioned as forming part of the Le Conseil Judiciaire dejeuner: Put a dozen fat oysters into a saucepan. When the liquor is about to boil, place them...
-Pain (Fr)
Bread. Petits Pains Small loaves, rolls. Pains De La Mecque Mecca loaves, cream puffs. Pain De Foie De Veau Mould or loaf of liver paste. Pain De P...
-Pancake Parties
This reminds one that last year pancake parties were all the go at the fashionable seaside places in France. At Etrctat especially it became quite a mania. The pancake batter was brought on the beach...
-Parsley
This well-nigh indispensable herb can be grown easily from the seed in a box in a cellar or in a garden corner; it can be propagated also by dividing the roots. Its flavor is mild but pleasant and esp...
-Partridge
The old bird confessedly has a much higher flavor than the young one but do what one may the cook will never obtain the delicacy and tenderness which are characteristic of the young birds. The best wa...
-Paste Cups
Like the paper cases, but formed of paste, almost as thin as paper, done by dipping an iron shape into pancake batter and holding the shape in hot fat until the thin coating of batter is fried and wil...
-Paste
Several kinds are made. Short Paste The commonest only slightly shortened has 1/4 lb. of either suet, lard, or butter to a pound of flour. Next, for boiled dumplings, has 1/2 lb. shorten...
-Pate Mele
Mixed pate; a raised pie filled with several kinds of meat cut in small blocks, interspersed with mushrooms, almonds, pistachios, and small pickles, all solidified in the pie shell with jelly. To be e...
-Patties
Two distinct kinds are generally understood by this term. (/) The puff paste shell or vol-au-vent, baked by itself, and the hollow middle filled afterwards. (2) Tiny pies made by lining patty-pans wit...
-Peach
One of the choicest of American fruits; grows largest, choicest, and in greatest number of varieties. Delaware and California produce the most constant crops and control the canning business of the co...
-Peacock
Formerly served at royal banquets with the utmost pomp and ceremony, generally with its plumage replaced after cooking and its beak and claws gilded. It is occasionally now sold for turkey and passes ...
-Pear
The pear is produced in the greatest perfection and abundance in California. The Bartlett variety is the best for table use. Shipped in boxes in its fresh state to all parts it is obtainable almost ev...
-Peas
Green Peas A La Francaise Boiled and white sauce added. Green Peas A L'Anglaise Dressed with butter and salt only. Petits Pois A La Parisienne Boiled with onions, butter...
-Pepper
Ground pepper is subjected to adulteration to a greater extent, probably, than any other commodity required in the hotel store-room, and the simplest means to avoid imposition is to buy the pepper in ...
-Persimmon
A wild fruit of the Middle and Southern Slates; good but neglected; grows on trees of small dimensions. It has the shape and appearance of a small tomato, the color, however, is yellow when nearly mat...
-Pheasant
The pheasant has probably been more praised and more abused than any other game bird. Dr. Kitchiner says' its rarity is its best recom^ mendation, while Kettner says, if kept till the fit-melte is fu...
-Pie
There is a marked dissimilarity between the English and American idea of pie. An English feast is scarcely complete without pie, and at a ball supper there will be a variety; but they are pies of meat...
-Pie. Continued
Raised French Pies Are often made in winter, as they will keep a week or two closely covered, and they are frequently sent, packed in a close tin box, for a considerable distance as a Christinas gi...
-Pigeons
Pigeons, quails, and other dark-fleshed birds have the reputation af being a heating diet, which is probably correct. But, however that may be, one epicurean rule holds good with pigeons, which is, ...
-Pig
How To Serve Roast Pig Of late they have got into a trick of serving up the roasted pig witthout the usual concomitants. I hate the innovating spirit of this age; it is my aversion, and will undo ...
-Pike
Fresh-water fish common and plentiful in America. The pike has been honored with the most elaborate cooking in France, pike a la Chambord being an artistic dish. There are many better fish than the pi...
-Pistachio Nuts
Much valued in pastry and confectionery for their pea-green color and almond flavor. The nut is gathered in the green state. It is about the size of a filbert, is the seed of a tree which grows in Ita...
-Plate
At the sale of a collection of old plate, which took place a few days ago at a country house in Bedfordshire, the extraordinary price of eighty-six shillings per ounce was paid for a pair of old Engli...
-Plovers
The best plovers are the golden plovers. They were the first birds that were eaten without being drawn, and they are still dressed in this way. Broiled Plovers Broiled plovers are very g...
-Plovers' Eggs
Plovers' eggs have, however, a far higher reputation than the birds themselves. They are delicious little morsels hard-boiled; they are incomparable in a salad or sandwich; and most admirable of all s...
-Plum Pudding
Peculiar to Christmas in this country-, as crepes and pancakes are to Shrovetide elsewhere. It has been an institution in Britain for centuries, but in olden times was a porridge, a sort of mincemeat,...
-Pop-Corn
A small variety of Indian corn;the grains burst and turn inside out when parched. There is a great difference in corn, and those who prepare it for sale test every sample in the popper before buying. ...
-Pork
Roast pork should, like lamb, be well cooked, carefully and regularly baked; onion and apple sauce served in separate tureens. Leg Of Pork Laid in salt for 4 days, boiled until nearly do...
-Porpoise
Sea-fish of the smooth-skinned sort. Schools of porpoises sportin shallow water near the shore and sometimes in advance of a vessel for days at a time. They are captured for their oil. Po...
-Pot-Au-Feu
Fire pot; the French national soup. Pot A Feu Bourgeoisu The French national dish is unquestionably the world-famed pot-ait-feu, and there is hardly a Frenchman, rich or poor, who does ...
-Potato
The potato is not in France the homely esculent that it is on this side the ocean. There are as many ways of preparing it asihere were in Goldsmith's time of cooking a nettle-top. Potatoes are oniy a...
-Potato. Part 2
Anna Potatoes A specialty at Delmonico's renowned New York restaurants. Cut very thin slices right across the largest potatoes; lay the slices in flat layers on a small plate that will bear the hea...
-Potato. Part 3
Pommes A La Creme Au Gratin Boiled sliced in white sauce with Parmesan cheese, bread-crumbs on top, browned in the oven. Pommes Au Lard Stewed potatoes with bits of bacon in the sauce...
-Potato. Part 4
Pommes A La Hollandaise Cut raw into shape of sections of orange, boiled barely done, drained, shaken up with butter, salt and parsley dust. Long Branch Potatoes Long strings cut with...
-Potatoes In Sweet Dishes
Nothing in the domestic history of the potato is more curious than the slow degrees by which cooks came to treat the tuber as a savory and not as a sweet dish - as an accompaniment to the strongest me...
-Potato Spirit
We are told by the French authorities, and we have no reason to doubt the veracity of their statements, that nearly one-half of the brandy imported into Her Imperial Majesty's British domains is nothi...
-Prairie Hen
Ruffed grouse. For ways of cooking see grouse. The prairie hen is abundant in the Western states, gathering in flocks of-50 or more in the neighborhood of corn fields. This bird is very much better wh...
-Puddings
A number of the old standard puddings can be found described under the respective letters; the list to follow here are names likely to be met with in French bills of fare. Whence Comes Pudd...
-Pumpkin Pies
One quart of sifted pumpkin, one quart of rich sweet milk, 12 eggs, 1/2, pound of butter, 1 pound of sugar, 2 grated nutmegs, 4 spoonfuls of rose water. Bake the mixture in a puff-paste in pie pans. ...
-Quails
Plentiful in almost every American market in the winter season, and the standard dish is broiled quail on toast. This habit or custom in regard to the cooking, although, of course, spontaneous in its ...
-Quails. Continued
Cailles Bardees Hut in roasting, the fewer the trimmings the better the bird. A vine leaf tied over the breast and covered with a slice of fat bacon (the method known as barding) is quite allowabl...
-Quenelles
Small balls or. egg shapes of pounded white meat The most elaborately made have the meat pounded in a morterasdforced through a seive. They are served in consommes and soups and enter in several of th...
-Rabbit
Rabbit meat evidently occupies an equivocal position in the list of delicacies. It is unquestionably good food. Young rabbit compares favorably with chicken and is made to do duty for chickeh sometime...
-Ramakins Or Ramequins
The latter is the French spelling, but is oftenest used. They are cheese puffs or little puddings of cheese baked in paper cases. Made of 1/2 pint milk, 2 oz. butter, 1 large tablespoon flour, 2 oz. g...
-Raspberry
One of the choicest fruits, most perishable, and of a very transient season. Most valued as raw fruit for breakfast. Raspberries And Cream Berries served in glass dishes or saucers, crea...
-Red Snapper
One of the very finest American fishes. Its flesh is the whitest and very firm, if there be a defect at all it may be that the flesh is too firm. Its flavor is delicate without being so decided as to ...
-Reed Birds
The reed birds of the North are the rice birds of the South. They swarm on the rice plantations to an extent that becomes serious through their depredations upon the grain, and at times all available ...
-Rennet
Liquid used to mix with fresh milk to change it to sweet curd, whereof cheese is made. This sweet curd is useful also in some kinds of dessert, as curds with clotted cream, and, drained as if for chee...
-Rhubarb
When preparing rhubarb, particularly for pies, see what a metamorphosis takes place by the judicious addition of a little candied lemon-peel, a little fresh lemon-peel, a squeeze of lemon-juice, and a...
-Rice
A southern luxury, almost a necessity, and the cooking of it is carried to perfection. How To Bon Rice The object is to have all the grains separate when done. Drop the rice into plenty ...
-Roaches
The most successful means of destroying or banishing roaches from a building seem to be: (/)-Borax thrown around plentifully where they run, which is near where water is to be found, for roaches drink...
-Rock Sugar
This is the candy rock work used to build up ornamental pieces of confectionery and to sell as sponge candy; it can be made of all colors and flavors: Boil a pint of clarified sugar in a copper earthe...
-Roquefort Cheese
Well-known imported cheese of a dry and solid sort and high flavor. It is ranked among the choice comestibles for high-priced tables. Can be bought at the fancy grocery stores at about double the pric...
-Royal Custards For Soups
These have come to be so called from their being the one showy adjunct to Consomme Royale. They are pieces cut in some regular shape out of a cake of cooked egg that is like an omelet steamed instea...
-Russian Cookery
The Russians are great soup eaters. Amongst their most favorite potages may be mentioned Vesiga soup and cucumber soup. Russian Vesiga Soup The Vesiga is a gelatinous substance that enve...
-American Salads
The three American salads are raw tomatoes, lettuce, and chicken salad. There arc other favorites and nearly all varieties are eaten when offered but the distinction in regard to these is that they ar...
-American Salads. Part 2
The True Lettuce Salad Sir Henry Thompson, in his little work, gives a short and clear description how to make this: The materials must be secured fresh, are not to be too numerous and diverse, mu...
-American Salads. Part 3
Nest Eggs This specialty, which we owe to American inventiveness, would certainly be attractive amongst cold dishes for the hot weather. Its preparation is as follows: Take a quantity of fresh spr...
-American Salads. Part 4
The Saladejaponaise The following is the recipe ror the famous Japanese Salad, from Alexander Dumas, Francillon. Annette: You must boil potatoes in a little stock, cut them in slices as if for a...
-American Salads. Part 5
Salade De Pommes De Tekre Aux Truffes A good recipe for a potato salad, which is in many ways preferable to the famous SaladeJaponaise. Boil and slice the potatoes. Slice also very thin some truff...
-American Salads. Part 6
Anchovy Salad At Kettner's famous restaurant in Soho they sometimes serve among the hors d'ceuvres anchovy-salad garnished with diminutive pickled onions. Salade D'Anchois Kettner,...
-Salad Dressings
Home-made salad dressing, it goes without saying, is infinitely better than that bought ready made. A few not generally known items on the subject may be acceptable. First you can boil your dressing a...
-Salmon
Hints On Salmon Cooking Salmon ought to be eaten as soon as possible after it is caught. Nothing can then exceed the beautiful curdiness of its texture, whereas your kept fish gets a flaccidity th...
-Sandwich
Two thin slices of bread with a thinner slice of meat or something equivalent between. Meat, or potted meat, fish, hard-boiled eggs, or grated cheese may be used as the lining to the two surfaces of ...
-Sardine
When it reaches its full growth, the true sardine is a little smaller than the herring; at this stage it is fat, oily, and of a mediocre taste. It weighs between a quarter and a third of a pound. Thi...
-Sauces
Most of the established standard sauces recognized by modern cooks will be found described more particularly under their respective proper letters. Said About Sauces For grilled dishes...
-Sauce
Admiral Fish. (SeeAdmiral). A La Minute Quick sauce; flour, water and wine in the pan the meat is fried in. Albert Cream-colored, sprinkled with parsley; contains shallo...
-Cold Sauses
For cold meats; vinegar, sugar, mustard and horseradish. California Brown; same as Bour-guignotte with California wine. Caper Butter sauce with tapers mixed in, and caper v...
-Cold Sauces. Part 2
Currant Jelly Sauce Jelly, espagnole, and port wine; boiled. Currant Sauce The preceding with whole red currants added. Curry Yellow; onion, ham, and parsley fried; flou...
-Cold Sauces. Part 3
Groseilles Vertest French gooseberry sauce. Green berries with butter and bread-crumbs. Hachee Sauce Brown, mixed. Containing shallots, mushrooms, gherkins, parsley, capers, vinegar, ...
-Cold Sauces. Part 4
Marrons See Chestnut Sauce. Marrow Beef marrow in slices added at last to brown sauce. Matelote See Matelote. Matrimony Sauce For dumplings; brown sugar, v...
-Cold Sauces. Part 5
Parisian, Sweet Sherry, sugar and yolks whipped over fire, cream added. Parsley (1) Chopped parsley in butter sauce. (2) Parsley juice and puree in butter sauce. Pepper ...
-Cold Sauces. Part 6
Sauce A La Russe A white sauce with horseradish, vinegar, yolks and cream. Russian Sauce Hot; shallots, lean ham, herbs, stewed in butter; horseradish, sugar, vinegar, wine, white sau...
-Cold Sauces. Part 7
Verte Green sauce; ravigote. Venitienne For fish; white sauce made of seasoned fish broth, yolks added, lemon juice, parsley. Verjuice For ducks; green grapes boiled and...
-Sausages
In Vienna a mighty fair is kept open on the green sward of the Wurstl-Prater, or Sausage-Park, throughout the spring, summer, and autumn months of every year. From April To October The Saus...
-Scallop
A bivalve; a larger sort of cockle, white; shipped like oysters in bulk without the shells, and obtainable at the fish-markets. Can be cooked in many of the same ways as oysters, fried, scalloped, in ...
-Scottish Cookery
There is a demand pressed upon hotel-keepers and stewards for peculiarly Scotch dishes for annual celebrations more frequently than for those of any other nationality, and the following repertory will...
-Scottish Cookery. Part 2
Scotch Hotch Potch I may mention, too, that I am the happy possessor of a ' plain directions ' for making 'hotch-potch' and 'cockie-leekie.' The first is made of a great variety of vegetables - gr...
-Scottish Cookery. Part 3
Scotch Broth A Scotch Recipe. Put a teacupful of pearl barley into four quarts of cold water, let it boil, add 2 lbs. of scrag of mutton or thin flank of beef, two onions, two turnips, two carrots ...
-Scottish Cookery. Part 4
Scotch Woodcock Take three slices of bread, about half an inch thick, remove crust and toast quickly; butter on both sides and spread anchovy-paste thickly on one side only; place these on a hot di...
-Scottish Cookery. Part 5
Scotch Pudding To one qvart of well-cooked barley add six ounces of sifted sugar, mix both together with one quart of milk in a stewpan, then add four ounces of fresh butter, a pinch of salt, the r...
-Scottish Cookery. A Scottish Bill Of Fare
Dinner given by the Scottish Society of Sheffield, at the Clarence Hotel in that town, to Commemmorate the anniversary of the poet Burns: The Praises wi' admonition due will say the Selkirk Grace. ...
-Sea Urchin
Another radiate, and the only other one of this class that I know to be eatable, is the Echinus - the sea-urchin, or sea-egg. This animal carries a system of channels and membranes in a hollow globe ...
-Shad
American sea-fish; an early spring luxury. It enters the rivers in immense shoals, the southern rivers first and those further northward in succession as the season advances, where it is taken and shi...
-Shrimp
The true shrimp is much smaller than the prawn, which is called shrimp in the United States, and therefore not so suitable for cooking purposes, but is tenderer and of finer flavor and hence better as...
-Simnel Cakes
They are raised cakes, the crust of which is made of fine flour and water, with sufficient saffron to give it a deep yellow color, and the interior is filled with the materials of a very rich plum cak...
-Smelt
A small salt-water fish of delicate flavor when fresh, and emitting an odor which has been likened to the smell of violets, and, again, to the odor of freshly-cut cucumbers. It loses this perfume in a...
-Eperlans Asna L'Anglaise
Smelts fried and served with anchovy sauce. Eperlans En Ragout Smelts stewed in white stock with herbs and wine. Eperlans Au Gratin Seasoned with dried herbs and dipped in ...
-Snails
The poor man's oyster is so appreciated by the French that Paris alone consumes some forty-nine tons daily, the best kind coming from Grenoble or Burgundy. The finest specimens are carefully reared ...
-Snipes
Well-known and fairly abundant small game birds; there are three or four varieties; superior to the woodcock. The English and French epicures say snipes must not be drawn, but the intestine and all ea...
-Soap
Soft Soap To one pound of potash, add three gallons of water. Boil the potash until it is all dissolved. Then add three pounds of any kind of soap-grease - the cleaner the better - to the lye, and ...
-Sole
No other fish is named so frequently in English and French menus as the sole and, as a consequence, it is named with great frequency in menus of this side as well, yet there are no soles in American w...
-Soups
Said About Soups 'C'est la soicpe,' says one of the best of proverbs, 'qui fait le soldot.' ('It is the soup that makes the soldier.') Excellent as our troops are in the field, there cannot be a ...
-Soups Of Beef
Alamode Beef Soup See Alamode. Beef Soup A L'Anglaise Smooth brown soup of stock thickened with roux, lean beef cut in squares, celery, turnips, carrots likewise. Beef Brot...
-Soups Of Chicken
Chicken A La Chif-Fonade Seasoned clear chicken broth, pieces of chicken in it previously half-fried; shred lettuce, sorrel, chervil added. Chicken A La Kitchener Broth, thickened whi...
-Soups Farinaceous
Tapioca Soup A La Montglas Thin tomato soup with tapioca, macaroni cut short, breast of chicken and red tongue in shreds. Tapioca Au Consomme Clear soup with tapioca. Tapio...
-Soups Of Fish
Fish Soup A La Brabanconxe Strong fish stock with Rhine wine and tomato puree added; royal custards and collops of fish. Fish Soup A La Bateliere Thickened fish stock with sherry, o...
-Soups Of Game
See also Bisques, Hare, Game, Partridge. Game Soup A La Corcoise A soup of partridges, rabbit, salt pork, ham, smoked sausages, soup beef, dried mushrooms, lentils, and vegetables. The m...
-Soups Of Italian Pastes
Macaroni Soup Boiled macaroni cut short in beef broth. Macaroni A La Calabraise A dish of macaroni and cheese, brown tomato sauce, garlic, butter, etc., served aside with beef broth. ...
-Soups Of Lamb And Mutton
Lamb Soup A La Piemontaise Pieces of lamb in squares half fried, flour, stock, vegetables, rice. Lamb Soup A La Winchester White soup with cream, starch, wine, leeks and meat cut smal...
-Soups Of Peas And Beans
Green Pea Soup A La Duchesse Dry green peas boiled with ham and herbs, rubbed through a seive; the liquor added, and croutons. Green Pea Soup A La Marly Green peas in chicken broth, w...
-Soups Of Potatoes
Puree Of Potatoes A La Faubonne Potatoes cooked with ham, pounded through a seive in beef stock with yolks, butter, and julienne vegetables. Puree A La Jackson Puree with boiling crea...
-Soups Of Rice
Riz A La Flamande Thickened stock with rice and assorted vegetables, including Brussels sprouts or cabbage cut small. Riz A L'Indienne Curry soup with rice and pieces of chicken. ...
-Soups Of Shell
Fish - Soft Clam Soup Clams opened and hard part removed, boiled two minutes in broth, add boiling milk and white sauce or thickening, butter, mace, salt, pepper, crackers. Clam Soup, Am...
-Soups Of Turnips
Turnip Puree Soup Use young white garden turnips. Peel, boil two minutes, then pour off the water; slice the turnips and allow 1 lb. of the vegetables to a pint of separated milk; 12 whole white pe...
-Soups Of Calf's Head
Calf's Head Soup A La Duchesse White soup with calfs' head cut in squares, pieces of macaroni and small quenelles. Calf's Head Soup A La Brighton Veal broth with vegetables and aromat...
-Soups Of Mixed Vegetables
Vegetable Soup A La Bourgeoise Stock with salt pork and cabbage and various vegetables, all sliced and served in the soup with sliced bread. Vegetable Soup A La Hollandaise Balls scoo...
-Soups Of Mixed Vegetables. Continued
Potage A La Croissy Puree of white beans and vegetables together; whole green peas added. Consomme Printaniere Clear soup with small-cut spring vegetables, string beans, peas, asparag...
-Spanish Cookery
The same names of dishes are found in the Spanish bill of fare as in the Mexican, as might be expected, and it is likely to be the case that the high-class cuisine in the City of Mexico and of the sam...
-Spanish Cookery. Part 2
The Olla Podrida Is the national stew rather than a soup. It is composed exclusively of Spanish produce, such as garbanzos (chick peas), chirizos (Spanish red sausages), long pepper, garlic, tomato...
-Spanish Cookery. Part 3
Chanfaina Is one of the oldest and most celebrated national dishes in Spain, and the name is mentioned in many a legend. The recipe is as follows: Boil a pork or mutton liver in salt water, and cut...
-Sparrow
The tiny little wren lives3years, the thrush 10, the lark 13, the common hen of commerce 10, the boarding house brand 75, the crow 100, and the English sparrow is immortal. Sparrow Pie ...
-Spinach
Said about Spinach: Spinach, to be truly enjoyed, should never be eaten without liberal saturation of gravy; and French epicures say, 'Do not forget the nutmeg.' This vegetable goes excellently with ...
-Stilton Cheese
An English cheese, very choice and dear. It is made small in size and drum-shaped, is cream-colored, and has a rough or wrinkled crust. Just at the time this cheese has become fashionable in the Unite...
-Strawberry
A prime luxury in its raw state when fresh, and good again in the form of preserves or jam, but a very poor fruit for stewing or pie-making. The best combinations with pastry instead of in pies are th...
-Sturgeon
The lordly sturgeon, which may be recommended to people with tolerably good digestions, larded with fillets of eel and anchovy, and basted with thick cray-fish sauce. A Sturgeon Of Full S...
-Sugar
In cooking such sweet preparations as are made with milk or cream, whether for custards, puddings, sauces, or whatever else, the sugar should be mixed in before the milk goes on the fire, and it will ...
-Sugar Spinnjng
Or web decoration. Sugar boiled as above to the beginning of caramel, or, take 2 lbs. white sugar, 1/2 teaspoon cream tartar, 1 pt water, boil to the crack for white web, or to the beginning of carame...
-Swan
Lately figured on the menu of Lingner's Restaurant. A roast swan, which weighed before trussin 35 lbs. As to its culinary treatment, the bird was larded and stuffed with chestnuts and truffles, braise...
-Sweetbreads
Both the thymus gland and the pancreas, are Included in the culinary name sweetbread, the substance of both being very similar and either answers the same purpose; the pancreas or stomach (or heart)...
-Sweetbreads. Continued
Petites Croustadks De Ris De Veau Patty cases shaped out of bread, fried and filled with sweetbread in sauce. Blanquette De Ris De Veau Aux Truffles Round slices cooked with slices of...
-Talleyrand
The sole depository on the entire tradition of the State, Talleyrand, even at the age of eighty, ate but one square meal in the day, his dinner; and every morning he required the menu of it from his...
-Terrapin
A salt-water tortoise. The subject of more speculative puffery and ingenious advertising to advance prices to the most absurd extremes than any other food-product of America. Every crawling, sliding, ...
-Tomatoes
These brilliantly colored fruits are most wholesome and delicious to those who have once acquired the taste for them. To our mind there is no more delightful salad at this time of year than a couple o...
-Tripe
It consists of the first stomach of the ox. The fibre differs from that of meat; is both nutritious and of easy digestion. To cleanse tripe is quite a trade of itself, it being an object to make the f...
-Truffle
A species of fungus which grows several inches under-ground, but never appears above the surface. It is one of the articles of great luxury in France and Italy, where it grows. As it cannot be cultiva...
-Turbot
This is the most highly esteemed of all flatfish, not only on account of its intrinsic excellence, but because of its favorable shape for the purposes of decoration. Famous as it is, and often appeari...
-Turkey
A turkey cock is best for wasting, a hen for boiling; and he sure it is properly cooked, for half-cooked poultry is simply uneatable. A turkey boiled is a turkey spoiled, runs the old proverb uncomp...
-Turtle
Half a dozen great turtles in the United States alone give their tender flesh to epicures, and minister to aldermanic amptitude. These all come out of the sea, and the chief of them is he of the green...
-Turtle. Continued
Turtle Soup A La Creole The only difference from the foregoing is the addition to the boiling soup before straining of a large proportion of stewed tomatoes, about one-fourth of the whole being tom...
-Woodcock
Small game-bird larger than a snipe; in season 5 months, September to January inclusive. Said About Woodcock There is nothing in the whole mundus edibilis equal to a well-prepared woodc...
-How To Fold Napkins. Folding Serviettes
Abundantly Illustrated With Many Handsome Styles and Diagrams Which Show How it is Done. The Escutcheon Fig. 1. Fig. 2. This is one of the easiest methods possible...
-How To Fold Napkins. Folding Serviettes. Part 2
The Shield Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. The Shield is almost identical with the Escutheon; there is, however, a slight difference, which forms a little variety and practice in...
-How To Fold Napkins. Folding Serviettes. Part 3
The Scroll Fig. 1. Fig. 3. The Scroll is simple to fold. It is represented complete (fig. 3). The bread is under the centre, on which the name card may be laid-It does not r...
-How To Fold Napkins. Folding Serviettes. Part 4
Another Boat The Boat is exceedingly pretty, especially if freighted with a few flowers. The serviette should be well starched to sit firm and sharp, and must be an exact square. First fold i...
-How To Fold Napkins. Folding Serviettes. Part 5
The Heraldic Rose And Star Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Spread a serviette, full size, flat on the table. It must be a perfect square, exact at the corners. Bring the four cor...
-How To Fold Napkins. Folding Serviettes. Part 6
The Fan The fan is made precisely like the Shell, only the edges are not turned down; but in folding, at first, are kept inside. The fan is placed in a glass, in the way shown in fig. 5. It is, ...
-How To Fold Napkins. Folding Serviettes. Part 7
Lorgnettes Lorgnettes are, very easy indeed, and are a neat design. Fold the serviette in half lengthways. Fold back an inch, or an inch and a half, at the double end, and bring it to the centre, i...
-How To Fold Napkins. Folding Serviettes. Part 8
The Archbishop's, Or Double Mitre The Archbishop's, or Double Mitre, is exceedingly pretty, and may be folded from any serviette. First fold the linen in half, and lay it flat on the table. Turn do...
-How To Fold Napkins. Folding Serviettes. Part 9
The Imperial Crown The Imperial Crown requires very stiff damask - an exact square is best, - and either a very small serviette, or a very large one folded in four, to reduce it to a quarter its si...
-How To Fold Napkins. Folding Serviettes. Part 10
The Tulip The Tulip requires a very stiff material. The folds are very simple, but require nicety of fingering and pressure with a hot iron. Bring all the corners to the centre, as for the Crown. B...
-How To Fold Napkins. Folding Serviettes. Part 11
The Arrow Head Fold the napkin in half lengthwise to the right, and turn down top edge A A by dotted line X X to centre line CC; repeat the same with bottom edge B B by dotted line O O to centre li...
-How To Fold Napkins. Folding Serviettes. Part 12
Mercury's Cap Commence this design by opening out the napkin with points to and from and right; and turn down all the corners to the centre, thus reducing the square smaller, turn the napkin over t...
-Hotel Napkin Folding. An Art Worth More Than Foreign Languages
The art of folding napkins is the most valuable accomplishment a waiter can acquire. There are some who contend that a waiter cannot be considered completely equipped for his profession without knowle...
-Hotel Napkin Folding. An Art Worth More Than Foreign Languages. Continued
Napkin Folding For Effect Napkins there must be at every dinner in every hotel of the least pretensions to elegance and it is a waste of a grand advantage not to make Use of them for ornamental eff...







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