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The London Art Of Cookery and Domestic Housekeepers' Complete Assistant | by John Farley



And domestic housekeepers complete assistant, uniting the principles of elegance, taste, and economy; And adapted to the use of servants, and families of every description. Containing every elegant and plain preparation in improved modern cookery; Pickling, potting, salting, collaring, and sousing; The whole art of confectionary, and making of jellies, jams, creams, and ices, the preparation of sugars, candying, and preserving; made wines, cordial-waters, and malt-liquors; Bills of fare for each month; Wood-cuts, illustrative of trussing, carving, etc.

TitleThe London Art Of Cookery and Domestic Housekeepers' Complete Assistant
AuthorJohn Farley
PublisherScatcherd And Letteuman
Year1811
Copyright1811, John Farley
AmazonThe London Art of Cookery

By John Farley, Formerly Principal Cook At The London Tavern the twelfth edition

-Preface
Cookery, like every other Art, has been moving forward to Perfection by slow Degrees; and yet daily Improvements are still making, as must be the Case in every Art depending on Fancy and Taste. From t...
-Bills Of Fare. January-June
Bill Of Fare For January. First Course. Second Course. Bill Of Fare For February. First Course Second Course. Bill Of Fare For March. First Course. Second Course. Bill Of Fare For ...
-Bills Of Fare. July-December
Bill Of Fare For July. First Course. Second Course. Bill Of Fare For August. First Course. Second Course. Bill Of Fare For September. First Course. Second Course. Bill Of Fare For Oc...
-Introduction
In a publication like the present, it would be of little utility to trace the origin of cookery; nor would it be easy to say at what period man exchanged vegetable for animal diet: certain it is, that...
-Hints On Domestic Economy
To every mistress of a family, we cannot too strenuously recommend the superintendence of her domestic concerns, the investigation of all accounts, particularly those of her tradesmen and her servants...
-The Cook
Will be immediately under the inspection of the housekeeper ; but it is her province to dress the meat according to the modern costume, and afterwards to dish it up in an elegant manner. The larder mu...
-The Housemaid
Will also be particularly under the inspection of the housekeeper; but still a great deal will depend upon her own cleanliness and exertions: the beds not in use should be every day aired by shaking t...
-The Laundry Maid
Should always use the cinders reserved for her use by the cook, as they will answer equally well with coals; and when burnt either in the ironing stove or under the copper, will give an intense heat. ...
-The Coachman
Generally is entrusted by his master to purchase the hay, oats, beans, and straw: in the choice of all these he cannot be too particular, as his horses cannot thrive upon bad com or hay, nor will stra...
-Chapter I. Marketing. Directions For The Proper Choice Of Different Rinds Of Provisions. Beef
In the choice of ox-beef, observe, that, if the meat is young, it will have a fine smooth open grain, of a pleasing carnation red, and feel tender; the fat must be rather white than yellow ; for when ...
-Mutton
If you squeeze young mutton with your fingers, it will feel very tender ; but if it be old, it will feel hard and continue wrinkled, and the fat will be fibrous and clammy. The grain of ram mutton is ...
-Lamb
The head of a lamb is good, if the eyes are bright and plump; but if they are sunk and wrinkled, it is stale. If the vein in the neck of the fore-quarter appear of a fine blue, it is fresh ; but if it...
-Veal
The flesh of a cow-calf is whiter than that of a bull, but the flesh is not so firm; the fillet of the former is generally preferred, on account of the udder; if the head is fresh, the eyes will be pl...
-Pork
Measly pork is very dangerous to eat; but this state of it is easily discovered, by the tat being full of little kernels. If it is young the lean will break on being pinched, and the skin will dent, b...
-Venison
The fat of venison must, in a great measure, determine your choice of it. If the fat is thick, bright, and clear, the clefts smooth and close, it is young ; but a very wide tough cleft, shows it is ol...
-Game
Hares Both the age and freshness of a hare are to be considered in the choice of it. When old, the claws are blunt and rugged, the ears dry and tough, and the cleft wide and large; but on the contrar...
-Poultry
Turkeys If acock turkey is young, it will have a smooth black leg, with a short spur; the eyes will be full and bright, and the feet limber and moist; but you must carefully observe, that the spurs a...
-Fish
The general rules for discovering whether fish are fresh or stale, are by observing the colour of their gills, which should be of a lively red ; whether they are hard or easy to be opened, the standin...
-Butter
In buying of butter, you must not trust to the taste the seller gives you, lest he give you a taste of one lump, end sell you another. In choosing salt butter, trust rather to your smell than taste, b...
-Cheese
Observe the coat of your cheese before you purchase it; for if it be old, with a rough and ragged coat, or dry at top, you may expect to find little worms or mites in it. If it is moist, spongy, or fu...
-Eggs
To judge properly of an egg, put the greater end to your tongue, and if it feel warm it is new; but if cold, it is stale; and according to the degree of heat or cold there is in the egg, you will judg...
-Chapter II. Directions For Trussing
Preliminary Hints And Observations Though the London poulterers truss every thing before they send it home, yet it is absolutely necessary that every cook should know how to perform this business pro...
-Turkey Trussing
When you have properly picked your turkey, break the leg-bone close to the foot, and draw out the strings from the thigh, for which purpose you must put it on a hook fastened against the wall. Cut o...
-Geese Trussing
Having picked and stubbed your goose clean, cut the feet off at the joint, and the pinion off at the first joint. Then cut off the neck close to the back; but leave the skin of the neck long enough ...
-Duck Trussing
Ducks and Geese are trussed in the same manner, excepting that the feet are left on the ducks, and are turned close to the legs. ...
-Fowl Trussing
They must first be picked very clean, and the neck cut off close to the back. Then take out the crop, and with your middle finger loosen the liver and other matters. Cut off the vent, draw it clean,...
-Chicken Trussing
These must be picked and drawn in the same manner as fowls. If the chickens are to be boiled, cut off the nails, give the sinews a nick on each side of the joint, put the feet iu at the vent, and th...
-Wild Fowl Trussing
The directions we are giving will answer for all kinds of wild fowl in general. Having picked them clean, cut off the neck close to the back, and with your middle finger loosen the liver and guts next...
-Pigeon Trussing
You must first pick them, and cut off the neck close to the back. Then take out the crop, cut off the vent, and draw out the guts and gizzard, but leave in the liver, for a pigeon has no gall. If yo...
-Woodcock and Snipe Trussing
These birds are very tender to pick, especially if they be not quite fresh. They must therefore be handled as little as possible, for even the heat of the hand will sometimes pull off the skin, when...
-Larks, Wheat-Ears Trussing
When you have picked them clean, cut off their heads, and the pinions at the first joint. Beat the breast-bone flat with the handle of a knife, turn the feet close to the legs, and put one into the ot...
-Pheasants And Partridge Trussing
Pick them very clean, cut a slit at the back of the neck, take out the crop, and loosen the liver and gut next the breast with your fore-finger, then cut off the vent and draw them. Cut off the pini...
-Hare Trussing
Having cut off the four legs at the first joint, raise the skin of the back, and draw it over the hind legs. Leave the tail whole, draw the skin over the back, and slip out the fore legs. Cut the s...
-Rabbit Trussing
Rabbits are to be cased in the same manner as hares, only observe to cut off the ears close to the head. Cut the vent open, and slit the legs about an inch upon each side the rump. Make the hind leg...
-Chapter III. Boiling
Preliminary Hints And Observations Neatness being a most material requisition in a kitchen, the cook should be particularly cautious to keep all the utensils perfectly clean, and the pots and saucepa...
-Boiling. Continued
To Boil Veal Like Sturgeon Take a small delicate fillet of veal, from a cow-calf; take off the skin, and then lard it all over, top, bottom, and sides, with some bacon and ham. Put into a stewpan som...
-Poultry Boiling
Chickens Pur your chickens into scalding water, and as soon as the feathers will slip off, take them out, otherwise they will make the skin hard. After you have drawn them, lay them in skimmed milk f...
-Poultry Boiling. Continued
Another Way Singe a goose, and pour over it a quart of boiling milk. Let it lie in it all night, then take it out, and dry it well with a cloth. Cut small a large onion and some sage, put them into t...
-Fish Boiling
Salmon Having scalded your salmon, take out the blood, wash the fish well, and lay it on a fish plate. Put your water in a fishean, with a little salt, and when it boils, put in your fish for half a ...
-Fish Boiling. Continued
Turbot Boiled With Capers Wash and dry a small turbot, then take some thyme, pars-ley, sweet herbs, and an onion sliced. Put them into a stew-pan, then lay in the turbot, (the stewpan should be just ...
-Chapter IV. Roasting
Preliminary Hints And Observations Put a little salt and water into the dripping-pan, and with it baste the meat a little. When dry, dredge well with flour, and baste with fresh butter; because it wi...
-Roasting. Part 2
Tongues Or Udders The tongue should be parboiled, before it is put down to roast; stick eight or ten cloves about it; baste it with butter, and serve it up with some gravy. An udder may be roasted af...
-Roasting. Part 3
Hind Quarter Of A Pig, Lamb Fashion At that season of the year, when house lamb bears an extraordinary price, the hind quarter of a large pig will be a very good substitute for it. Take off the skin ...
-Poultry Roasting
Stuffing For Turkeys, Hares, Rabbits, Veal, Etc Chop very fine, beef suet, parsley, thyme, eschalots, a very small quantity of marjorum ; savory, basil, and lemon peel, with grated nutmeg, two eggs (...
-Poultry Roasting. Continued
Larks Skewer a dozen larks, and tie both ends of the skewer to the spit. Dredge and baste them, and let them roast ten minutes. Break half a penny loaf into crumbs, and put them, with a piece of butt...
-Fish Roasting
Eels And Lampreys Eels and lampreys are roasted with puddings in their bellies in the same manner. Cut off their heads, gut them, and take off the blood from the bone as clean as possible. Make a for...
-Chapter V. Baking
Leg Of Beef Cut the meat off a leg of beef, and break the bones; put it into an earthen pan, with two onions and a bundle of sweet herbs, and season it with a spoonful of whole pepper, and a few clov...
-Baking. Continued
Salmon Cut a piece of salmon in slices of an inch thick, and make forcemeat as follows: take some of the flesh of the salmon, and the same quantity of the meat of an eel, with a few mushrooms. Season...
-Chapter VI. Broiling
Preliminary Hints And Observations Before you lay your meat on the gridiron, be careful that your fire be very clear: the kind of cinder termed coak makes the best fire for broiling. Let your gridiro...
-Broiling. Part 2
Broiled Fish Prepared Thus Wipe the fish dry, flour them well, and have the gridiron clean ; then rub the bars with a veal caul, and put the fish at a proper distance. Broil them gently over a clear ...
-Broiling. Part 3
Salmon Take pieces or slices of salmon, wipe dry, dip in sweet oil (or for want of oil, in fresh butter that has been oiled), and season with pepper and salt; fold them in pieces of writing paper, br...
-Chapter VII. Frying
Preliminary Hints And Observations Be careful always to keep your frying-pan clean, and see that it is properly tinned. When you fry any sort of fish, first dry them in a cloth, and then flour them. ...
-Frying. Part 2
Loin Or Neck Of Lamb Having cut your lamb into chops, rub both sides of them with the yolk of an egg, and sprinkle some grated bread over them, mixed with a little parsley, thyme, marjoram, winter sa...
-Frying. Part 3
Eggs Put clarified butter in a frying-pan, break fresh eggs, one at a time ; put a little white pepper and salt, and turn them half over. They should be fried of a nice brown, but not hard. Potatoes...
-Frying. Part 4
Carp Scale and gut your carp, then wash them clean, lay them in a cloth to dry, flour them, and fry them of a fine light brown. Take some crusts, cut tnree-corner ways, and fry them and the roes.. Wh...
-Chapter VIII. Stews And Hashes
Rump Of Beef In order to stew rump of beef property, you must first half roast it, and then put it into a large saucepan, with two quarts of water, one pint of small beer, one pint of red wine two or...
-Stews And Hashes. Part 2
Beef Steaks Having procured rump steaks, cut thick for this purpose, pepper and salt them, and lay them in a stewpan, with some butter and a little water ; when brown, add half a pint of water, a bla...
-Stews And Hashes. Part 3
Lamb's Head In order to stew a lamb's head, wash and pick it very clean. Lay it in water for an hour, take out the brains, and with a sharp knife carefully extract the bones and the tongue; but be ca...
-Stews And Hashes. Part 4
Hashed Veal Cut your veal into thin round slices, of the size of a half-crown, and put them into a saucepan, with a' little gravy. Put to it some lemon-peel cut exceedingly fine, and a tea-spoonful o...
-Stews And Hashes. Part 5
Lamb's Head Minced Chop the head in halves, and blanch it with the liver, hearty and lights : clean the brains in warm water, dip them in yolk of egg, grated bread, and chopped parsley, seasoned with...
-Stews And Hashes. Part 6
Mutton Venison Skin and bone a loin of fine old wether mutton ; after removing the suet, put it into a cold stewpan for one night, with the bones round it, and pour over it a pint of port wine and a ...
-Stews And Hashes. Part 7
Fowl Slewed In Bice Take a fowl and half boil it in a moderate quantity of water: boil a quarter of a pound of rice, which, together with the fowl and a pint of veal gravy, must be put into a stew-pa...
-Stews And Hashes. Part 8
Hashed Turkeys, Fowls, And Rabbits Cut either of the above very neatly into pieces, and put it into a stewpan : into another stewpan put a piece of butter rolled in flour, and some chopped onions or ...
-Stews And Hashes. Part 9
Mushrooms (Brown) With a knife, clean a pottle of fresh mushrooms, put them into water, and when stewed, take them out with a small tin slice: put them into a stewpan with two ounces of fresh-butter,...
-Stews And Hashes. Part 10
Carp And Tench Carp and tench may be stewed in the following manner : gut and scale your carp and tench, and having dredged them with flour, fry them in dripping, or good suet, till they are brown. P...
-Stews And Hashes. Part 11
Lampreys And Eels Having skinned and gutted your lampreys, season them well with salt, pepper, a little lemon peel shred fine, mace, cloves, and nutmeg. Cut some thin slices of butter into the bottom...
-Stews And Hashes. Part 12
Escaloped Oysters Blanch the oysters, beard them, and strain the liquor; put a bit of butter into a stewpan, and when melted, add as much flour as will dry up the butter : now add the oyster liquor a...
-Chapter IX. Ragouts
A Fore Quarter Of House Lamb Cut off the knuckle bone, and take off the skin. Lard it all over with bacon, and fry of a nice light brown. Then put it into a stewpan, and just cover over with mutton g...
-Ragouts. Part 2
Sweetbreads ('Brown) Take throat sweetbreads, previously blanched and cut into slices; morels blanched and cut in halves ; stewed mushrooms ; egg balls (see Sauces) ; artichoke bottoms or Jerusalem a...
-Ragouts. Part 3
Livers Take as many livers as you would have for your dish. The liver of a turkey, and six fowl livers, will make a pretty dish. Pick the galls from them, and throw them into cold water. Put the live...
-Chapter X. Fricandeaus
Veal From a fillet of veal, cut a long or round piece; flatten with a chopper; make an incision in the under side; stuff with forcemeat containing oysters (see Sauces) ; fasten up the incision with a...
-Chapter XL. Fricasees
Lamb-Stones Take what quantity you please of lamb-stones, dip them in batter, and fry them of a nice brown in hog's lard. Have ready a little veal stock (see Sauces), and thicken with butter and flou...
-Fricasees. Part 2
Chickens (White) Cut them into pieces, and blanch and drain them dry ; put them into a stewpan with a little veal stock (see Sauces), a blade of mace, and an onion: stew gently till three parts done;...
-Fricasees. Part 3
Rabbits (White) Proceed as directed for chickens; but when nearly stewed, season with salt, white pepper, and a little lemon juice ; add a leason (see Sauces) of three eggs; simmer for five minutes, ...
-Fricasees. Part 4
Soles Skin, gut, and wash your soles very clean, cut off their heads, and dry your fish in a cloth. Then very carefully cut the flesh from the bones and fins on both sides, and cut the flesh longways...
-Chapter XII. Made Dishes
Preliminary Hints And Observations As this is one of the most important chapters in this book, it may not be improper to give the young cook some general hints. It is an important point to take care ...
-Made Dishes. Part 2
Beef-A-La-Toyal Take a brisket of beef, bone it, and with a knife make holes in it about an inch from each other. Fill one hole with fat bacon, a second with parsley chopped, and a third with chopped...
-Made Dishes. Part 3
Bouillie Beef Put the thick end of a brisket of beef into a kettle, and cover it over with water. Let it boil fast for two hours, then stew it close by the fireside for six hours more: put in with th...
-Made Dishes. Part 4
A Bound Of Beef Forced First rub it with some common salt, a little bay-salt, some saltpetre, and coarse sugar; then let it stand a full week or more, according to the size, turning it every day. Was...
-Made Dishes. Part 5
Beef Tails Having cut them into joints, blanch and wash them: put them in a stewpan with a sufficient quantity of stock, and braise till tender: drain them, and serve with haricot sauce over them. - ...
-Made Dishes. Part 6
Hodge Podge Take half a pound of pickled pork, half a pound of brisket of beef, each cut into two pieces, and four beef tails cut into joints having put them into a pot and covered them with water, b...
-Made Dishes. Part 7
Veal A La Bourgeoise Having cut veal into thick slices, lard them with bacon, and season them with kitchen pepper (see Sauces) and chopped parsley. Cover the bottom of your stewpan with slices of fat...
-Made Dishes. Part 8
Breast Of Veal A I'Ecossois Having boned the veal, lay over it a light forcemeat (see Sauces), and over that layers of minced ham, pickled cucumbers, fat bacon, and an omlet of eggs: roll tight in a ...
-Made Dishes. Part 9
Sweetbreads Of Veal A La Dauphine Lard the largest sweetbreads you can get, and open them in such a manner that you can stuff in forcemeat (see Sauces) : fill your sweetbreads, and fasten them with f...
-Made Dishes. Part 10
A Calf's Appurtenances Boil the lights and part of the liver; roast the heart stuffed with suet, sweet herbs, and a little parsley, all chopped small, a few crumbs of bread, some pepper, salt, nutmeg...
-Made Dishes. Part 11
Breast Of Veal In Hodge-Podge Cut the brisket of a breast of veal into little pieces, and every bone asunder. Then flour it, and put half a pound of good butter into a stewpan. When hot, throw in the...
-Made Dishes. Part 12
Savoury Dish Of Veal Having cut large collops out of a leg of veal, spread them abroad on a dresser, hack them with the back of a knife, and dip them into the yolks of eggs. Season with salt, mace, n...
-Made Dishes. Part 13
A Basque Of Mutton Lav the caul of a leg of veal in an earthen pan, of the size of a small punch-bowl, and take the lean of a leg of mutton that has been kept a week. Having chopped it exceedingly sm...
-Made Dishes. Part 14
Leg Of Mutton D La Haut-Gout Take a leg of mutton that has hung a fortnight; stuff every part of it with cloves of garlic, rub it with pepper and salt, and then roast it. When properly roasted, send ...
-Made Dishes. Part 15
Shoulder Of Lamb Braised, And Sorrel Sauce May be prepared as directed for leg of lamb, only serving it on sorrel sauce. Shoudder Of Lamb Glaized May be prepared also as directed for leg, etc. When...
-Made Dishes. Part 16
Lamb's Head And Appurtenances, With Poivrade Saw the head in two, take out the tongue whole, and clean and prepare the brains as above directed: boil the head and tongue till quite tender; pull out a...
-Made Dishes. Part 17
A Pig Au Pere Duillet Having cut off the head, and divided the pig into quarters, lard them with bacon, and season them well with salt, pepper, nutmeg, cloves, and mace. Place a layer of fat bacon at...
-Made Dishes. Part 18
Large Pigs' Feet And Ears Scald and clean them; split the feet, and tie them together with string: having put them into a pot covered with water, let them boil; skim clean, and add a little thyme, on...
-Made Dishes. Part 19
Ducks A La Daube Having larded two ducks, fill them with a good forcemeat, containing two eschalots minced very fine, and put them into a stove with a little second stock for ten minutes: add a pint ...
-Made Dishes. Part 20
Chicken Surprise One large fowl will do for a small dish. Roast it, and take the lean from the bones; cut it into thin slices, about an inch long, and toss it up with six or seven spoonsful of cream,...
-Made Dishes. Part 21
Pigeons Compote Skewer six young pigeons in the same manner as for boiling, put forcemeat (see Sauces) into the craws, lard them down the breast, and fry them brown. Put them into strong stock, and w...
-Made Dishes. Part 22
Pigeons En Poqueton Put some forcemeat into a small stewpan, and spread it at the bottom and sides as a paste, rubbing your stewpan first with butter. Put in a couple of pigeons, some sweetbreads and...
-Made Dishes. Part 23
Florendine Hares Let the hare be a full grown one, and let it hang up four or, five days before you case it. Leave on the ears, but take out all the bones, except those of the head, which must be lef...
-Made Dishes. Part 24
Turtle Take a turtle weighing one hundred pounds; the evening before you dress it, tie a cord to the two hind fins, and hang it up: tie a cord in like manner to the fore fins to pinion it; and cut of...
-Made Dishes. Part 25
Callipee Take a quarter of the under part of the turtle, and scald it; taking out the shoulder-bone, and filling the cavity with a well high seasoned forcemeat made with the lean of the turtle; put i...
-Made Dishes. Part 26
Souties Of Carp, Tench, Salmon, Eels Having cleaned the fish, bone and cut them into thin col-lops ; flat, and put them into a souties-pan prepared in the following manner: having taken a bit of fres...
-Made Dishes. Part 27
Entree Of Fillets Of Soles Having boned and filleted the soles, roll them up, tying them with thread: wipe one half of them dry, dip them in egg, roll in grated bread, and fry of a nice brown: boil t...
-Made Dishes. Part 28
Fillets Of Whitings Having boned and filleted the whitings, put the fillets for five minutes into boiling water; take them up, and serve, with Italian sauce over them. Fillets Of Sturgeon Are to be...
-Made Dishes. Part 29
Lobster In The Shell (Hot) Cut the fleshy parts of two or three middling sized lobsters into small squares, and season them : put the contents of the body into a mortar, with a quarter of a pound of ...
-Made Dishes. Part 30
Curry, With Gravy Cut two chickens into pieces, and fry gently in butter, strewing over them at the same time three table spoonsful of curry powder: have ready fried six large onions chopped small; p...
-Made Dishes. Part 31
Maccaroni Having boiled four ounces of maccaroni till quite tender, lay it on a sieve to drain, and then put it into a tossing-pari, with about a gill of cream, and a piece of butter rolled in flour....
-Chapter XIII. Frugal Dishes
Beef And Cabbage Cut the cabbage in slices as for pickling, and having rubbed the bottom of an iron pot with butter, put in layer of cabbage, either white or red, seasoned with white pepper; on this ...
-Frugal Dishes. Part 2
Beef A La Vinaigrette Cut slices of undone cold boiled beef about two inches thick, and stew in a gill of water, a gill of vinegar, and a gill of table beer : to these add an onion stuck with cloves,...
-Frugal Dishes. Part 3
China Chilo Mince a pound of raw mutton with a little of its fat, add two onions and a lettuce sliced, a pint of green pease,-half a gill of water, three ounces of clarified butter, season with white...
-Frugal Dishes. Part 4
Jugged Hare Having skinned and cleaned an old hare, cut it up in pieces, and season them with kitchen pepper, common pepper, and salt; lay these in a jar with some sweet herbs, three onions with a cl...
-Frugal Dishes. Part 5
Herrings Baked Gut, wash, and drain the herrings without wiping them ; rub them over with saltpetre, and let them lie all night on a board. Having put them into an earthen pan, sprinkle them over wit...
-Chapter XIV. Sauces
Beef Slock Having cut lean beef into pieces, put it into a pot with suf-ficient water to cover it: let it boil, and when boiling skim it well, adding a faggot of parsley and thyme, carrots scraped, l...
-Sauces. Part 2
Glaize Of Herbs Maybe prepared in the same way, from each herb separately; in order to extract the essence of each, and to render them portable; but the different glaizes must be preserved in bottles...
-Sauces. Part 3
Italian Sauce (White) - Sauce Italienne Proceed as above directed till the ingredients have simmered a quarter of an hour : add benshamelle to make up the requisite quantity, and let this simmer a mi...
-Sauces. Part 4
Ravigot Sauce Put into a stewpan a gill of stock, adding a small clove of garlic, a little burnet, tarragon, eschalot chopped, mushrooms, truffles and parsley shred fine ; let them simmer a few minut...
-Sauces. Part 5
Gravy For Poultry, Meat, And Steaks Cut slices of lean beef, lean ham, and veal; pare onions, turnips, carrots, and celery; cut them small, adding a faggot of parsley and thyme, a little mace and who...
-Sauces. Part 6
French Olive Sauce Stone the olives, and stew in veal stock till tender, and the liquor nearly reduced; season with cayenne, salt, and lemon juice. Sweet Sauce For Venison, Mutton, Etc Take half a ...
-Sauces. Part 7
Quir's Fish Sauce Half a pint of walnut pickle, half a pint of mushroom pickle, six anchovies pounded, six others whole, a glass of white wine, three blades of mace, and half a tea-spoonful of cayenn...
-Sauces. Part 8
Crab Sauce May be prepared as above directed for lobsters; the inside being pounded with the meat. Oyster Sauce, For Fish Having blanched the oysters, strain, and preserve their liquor: wash, drain...
-Sauces. Part 9
Cucumber Sauce Having pared the cucumbers, cut them into quarters, cutting out all the seeds, and dividing each quarter into four pieces: take as many small onions as pieces of cucumbers, and put the...
-Sauces. Part 10
Cold Forcemeat,For Balls, Me Take the same ingredients as above directed, and having well beaten them in a mortar, add yolk of egg and grated bread, sufficient to make into balls. Turtle Herbs, To P...
-Sauces. Part 11
Lemon Pickle Grate off very thin the out-rinds of two dozen of lemons, and cut the lemons into four quarters, but leave the bottoms whole. Rub on them equally half a pound of bay-salt, and spread the...
-Chapter XV. Soups And Broths
Preliminary Hints And Observations Take great care that your pots; saucepans, and covers, are very clean, and free from all sand and grease, and that they are properly tinned ; since, if this be not ...
-Soups And Broths. Part 2
Soup And Bauillie To make the bouillie, roll five pounds of brisket of beef tight with a tape; put it into a stewpot, with four pounds of the leg of mutton piece of beef, and about seven or eight qua...
-Soups And Broths. Part 3
Gravy Soup Take a shin of beef, and put it into six quarts of water, with a pint of peas, and six onions Set it over the fire, and let it boil gently till all the juice is out of the meat: strain thr...
-Soups And Broths. Part 4
Soup Au Bourgeois Take twelve heads of endive, and four or five bunches of celery; wash them very clean, cut them into small bits, let them be well drained from the water, put them into a large pan, ...
-Soups And Broths. Part 5
Vermicelli Soup Put four ounces of butter into a stewpan, cut in a knuckle of veal and a scrag of mutton into small pieces, about the size of a walnut. Slice in the meat of a shank of ham, with two o...
-Soups And Broths. Part 6
Almond Soup Chop into small pieces a neck of veal, and the scrag end of a neck of mutton, and put them into a large stewpan. Cut in a turnip, with a blade or two of mace, and five quarts of water: se...
-Soups And Broths. Part 7
Green Peas Soup Take a peck of green peas, shell and boil them in spring water till soft, and then work them through a hair sieve. Take the water the peas were boiled in, and put into it three slices...
-Soups And Broths. Part 8
Peas Soup For Winter Cut into small pieces about four pounds of lean beef, and about a pound of lean bacon, or pickled pork. Put them into two gallons of water, and skim it well when it boils. Then a...
-Soups And Broths. Part 9
Onion Soup Take eight or ten large Spanish onions, and boil them in milk and water till quite soft, changing the milk and water three times while the onions are boiling. When they are quite soft, rub...
-Soups And Broths. Part 10
Milk Soup TakE two quarts of new milk,two sticks of cinnamon, a couple of bay-leaves, a very little basket-salt, and a very little sugar. Then blanch half a pound of sweet almonds, while the former m...
-Soups And Broths. Part 11
Cray-Fish Soup Take half a hundred of fresh craw-fish, boil them, and pick out all the meat, which must be carefully saved: take a fresh lobster and pick out all the meat, which must be likewise save...
-Soups And Broths. Part 12
Skate Or Thornback Soup Skin and boil two pounds of skate or thornback in six luarts of water. When enough, take it up, pick off the flesh, and lay it by Put in the bones again, and about two pounds ...
-Chapter XVI. Roots And Vegetables
Preliminary Hints And Observations Be very careful that your greens are nicely picked and washed, and when so done, always lay them in a clean pan, for fear of sand and dust, which is apt to hang rou...
-Roots And Vegetables. Part 2
Carrots Scrape the carrots very clean, put them into the pot, and when they are enough take them out, and rub them in a clean cloth, then slice them into a plate. If young spring carrots, half an hou...
-Roots And Vegetables. Part 3
Asparagus Having scraped all the stalks very carefully till they look white, cut all the stalks even alike, throw them into water, and have ready a stewpan boiling. Put in some salt, and tie the aspa...
-Roots And Vegetables. Part 4
Endive Ragooed Lay three heads of fine white endive in salt and water for two or three hours. Then take a hundred of asparagus, and cut off the green heads; then chop the rest small, as far as it is ...
-Chapter XVII. Puddings
Preliminary Hints And Observations When you boil a pudding, take particular care that your cloth is clean, and remember to dip it in boiling water; flour it well, and give it a shake, before you put ...
-Puddings. Part 2
Marrow Pudding Grate a penny loaf into crumbs, and pour on them a pint of boiling hot cream. Cut very thin a pound of beef marrow, beat four eggs well, and then add a glass of brandy, with sugar and ...
-Puddings. Part 3
Orange Pudding Having boiled the rind of a Seville orange very soft, beat it in a marble mortar with the juice, and put to it two Naples biscuits grated very fine, a quarter of a pound of sugar, half...
-Puddings. Part 4
Sago Pudding Boil two ounces of sago in a pint of milk till tender. When cold, add five eggs, two Naples biscuits, a little brandy, and sugar it to the taste. Boil it in a bason, and serve it with me...
-Puddings. Part 5
Spinach Pudding Pick and wash clean a quarter of a peck of spinach, put it into a saucepan with a little salt, cover it close, and when boiled just tender, throw it into a sieve to drain. Then chop i...
-Puddings. Part 6
Flour Hasty Pudding Put four bay-leaves into a quart of milk, and set it on the fire to boil; then beat up the yolks of two eggs, and stir in a little salt: take two or three spoonsful of milk, and b...
-Puddings. Part 7
Transparent Pudding Pur eight eggs well beaten into a pan, with half a pound of butter, and the same quantity of loaf sugar beat fine, with a little grated nutmeg. Set it on the fire, and keep stirri...
-Puddings. Part 8
Suet Pudding Boiled Take four spoonsful of flour, a pound of suet shred small, four eggs, a spoonful of beaten ginger, a tea-spoonful of salt, and a quart of milk. Mix the eggs and flour with a pint ...
-Puddings. Part 9
A Baked Bread Pudding Rasp or crumble the crumb of a penny loaf, take the same quantity of flour, the yolks of four eggs, and two whites, a tea-spoonful of ginger, half a pound of raisins stoned, hal...
-Puddings. Part 10
Cowslip Pudding Cut and pound small the flowers of a peck of cowslips, with half a pound of Naples biscuits grated, and three pints of cream. Boil them a little, then take them off the fire, and beat...
-Puddings. Part 11
Cheese-Curd Pudding Turn a gallon of milk with rennet, and drain off all the curd from the whey. Put the curd into a mortar, and beat it with half a pound of fresh butter, till the butter and curd ar...
-Puddings. Part 12
Pennyroyal Dumpiins Grate the crumb of a penny loaf, take three quarters of a pound of beef suet, the same of currants, four eggs, a little brandy, a little thyme and pennyroyal, and a handful of par...
-Puddings. Part 13
Ratafia Pudding Boil a quart of cream, with a laurel leaf; take it out, and break in half a pound of Naples biscuits, half a pound of butter, some sack, nutmeg, and a little salt. Take it off the fir...
-Chapter XVIII. Pies
Preliminary Hints And Observations As the heat of your oven must be regulated by what you intend to bake, the following rules should be carefully attended to. Light paste requires a moderate oven, bu...
-Pies. Part 2
A Good Crust For Great Pies Put the yolks of three eggs to a peck of flour, and in some boiling water, then put half a pound of suet, and a pound and a half of butter. Skim off the butter and suet, a...
-Pies. Part 3
Calf's Foot Pie Having put the calf's feet into a saucepan, with three quarts of water, and three or four blades of mace, let them boil softly till there is about a pint and a half only : take out th...
-Pies. Part 4
Calfs-Head Pie Having cleansed and boiled the head tender, carefully take off the flesh as whole as possible: take out the eyes, and slice the tongue; make a good puff paste crust, cover the dish, an...
-Pies. Part 5
Yorkshire Giblet Pie Put a tea-cup full of grots into the blood of the goose while it is warm, in order to swell them. Grate the crumb of a penny loaf, and pour on it a gill of boiling milk. Shred ha...
-Pies. Part 6
Rabbit Pie To Be Eaten Hot Take a couple of young rabbits, and cut them into quarters; take a quarter of a pound of bacon, and bruise it to pieces in a marble mortar, with the livers, some pepper, sa...
-Pies. Part 7
Savoury Patties Take a quarter of a pound of beef suet, and a pound of the inside of a cold loin of veal, or the same quantity of cold fowl that has been either boiled or roasted, and chop them as sm...
-Pies. Part 8
Apple Pie Having put a good puff paste crust round the edge of the dish, pare and quarter the apples, and take out the cores: lay a thick row of apples; and throw in half the sugar intended to be put...
-Pies. Part 9
Onion Pie Peel some onions, and wash and pare some potatoes, and cut them into slices ; also pare some apples, and slice them. Make a good crust, cover the dish, and lay a quarter of a pound of butte...
-Pies. Part 10
Yorkshire Christmas Pie Having made a good standing crust, with the wall and bottom very thick, take and bone a turkey, a goose, a fowl, a partridge, and a pigeon. Season them well, and take half an ...
-Pies. Part 11
Egg Pie Take a pound of marrow, or beef suet, twelve eggs boiled hard, and chop them very fine. Season them with a little beaten cinnamon and nutmeg; take a pound of currants clean washed and picked,...
-Pies. Part 12
Tench Pie Lay a layer of butter at the bottom of the dish, then grate in some nutmeg, with pepper, salt, and mace. Lay in the tench, cover them with some butter, and pour in some red wine and a littl...
-Pies. Part 13
Flounder Pie Having gutted the flounders, wash them clean, and dry them in a cloth. Just boil them, cut off the meat clean from the bones, lay a good crust over the dish, and lay a little fresh butte...
-Chapter XIX. Pancakes
Cream Pancakes Mix the yolks of two eggs with half a pint of cream, two ounces of sugar, and a little beaten cinnamon, mace, and nutmeg; rub the pan with lard, and fry them as thin as possible : grat...
-Fritters
Custard Fritters Beat the yolks of eight eggs with one spoonful of flour, half a nutmeg, a little salt, and brandy, add a pint of cream; sweeten it, and bake in a small dish. When cold, cut it into q...
-Fritters. Part 2
Fritters Royal Put a quart of new milk into a saucepan, and when it begins to boil, pour in a pint of sack: take it off, let it stand five or six minutes, skim off the curd, and put it into a bason. ...
-Fritters. Part 3
Chicken Fritters Put on a stew pan with some new milk, and as much flour of rice as will be necessary to make it of a tolerable thickness. Beat three or four eggs, the yolks and whites together, and ...
-Fritters. Part 4
Vine-Leaf Fritters Having procured some of the smallest vine-leaves, and having cut off the great stalks, put them into a dish with some French brandy, green lemon rasped, and some sugar. Take a good...
-Part II. Pickling, Collaring, And Potting. Chapter I. Pickling
Preliminary Hints And Observations It is an essential point with the housekeeper, to take care never to be without pickles of her own preparing, that she may not be obliged to purchase them at shops,...
-Pickling. Part 2
Tarragon Vinegar Strip off the leaves of tarragon just as it is going into bloom, and to every pound of leaves put a gallon of strong white-wine vinegar in a stone jug, to ferment for a fortnight. T...
-Pickling. Part 3
Walnuts Pickled Black Your walnuts must be taken from the tree before the shell is hard, which may be known by running a pin into them, and always gather them when the sun is hot upon them. Put them ...
-Pickling. Part 4
Walnuts Pickled Green For this purpose, make choice of the large double or French walnuts, gathered before the shells are hard. Wrap them singly in vine leaves, put a few vine leaves in the bottom of...
-Pickling. Part 5
Codlins Your codlins must be gathered when they are about the size of a large French walnut. Put them into a pan with a great many vine-leaves at the bottom, and cover them well with the vine-leaves....
-Pickling. Part 6
Parsley Pickled Green Make a strong salt and water that will bear an egg, and throw into it a large quantity of curled parsley. Let it stand a week, then take it out to drain, make a fresh-salt and w...
-Pickling. Part 7
Cauliflowers Pull the whitest and closest cauliflowers into bunches, and spread them on an earthen dish. Lay salt all over them, and let them stand for three days to bring out all the water. Then put...
-Pickling. Part 8
Artichokes Take young artichokes as soon as they are formed, and boil them for two or three minutes in strong salt and water. Lay them upon a hair sieve to drain, and when cold, put them into narrow-...
-Pickling. Part 9
Samphire Lay green samphire into a clean pan, and throw over it two or three handfuls of salt; then cover it with spring water. Let it lay twenty-four hours, then put into a clean saucepan, throw in ...
-Chapter II. Collaring
Preliminary Hints And Observations It is a necessary article in collaring, to take care that you roll it up properly, and bind it close. Be cautious that you boil it thoroughly enough; and when quite...
-Collaring. Part 2
Calf's Head Take off the hair of a calf's head, but leave on the skin. Rip it down the face, and take outall the bones carefully from the meat. Steep it in warm milk till it is white, then lay it fla...
-Collaring. Part 3
Eels Cut the eel open, take out the bones, cut off the head and tail, and lay the eel flat on the dresser. Shred some sage as fine as possible, and mix it with black pepper beaten, some nutmeg grated...
-Chapter III. Potting
Preliminary Hints And Observations Before you send your meat to the oven, take care to cover it well with butter, fasten it down with strong paper, and bake it well. As soon as it comes from the oven...
-Potting. Part 2
Beef Take half a pound of brown sugar, and an ounce of saltpetre, and rub it into twelve pounds of beef. Let it lie twenty-four hours; then wash it clean, and dry it well with a cloth. Season it to t...
-Potting. Part 3
Pigeons Pick and draw the pigeons, cut off the pinions, wash them clean, and put them into a sieve to drain : dry them with a cloth, and season with pepper and salt. Roll a lump of butter in chopped ...
-Potting. Part 4
Chars After having cleansed them, cut off the fins, tails, and heads, and lay them in rows in a long baking-pan, having first seasoned them with pepper, salt, and mace. When done, let them stand till...
-Chapter IV. Salting And Sousing
Hung Beef Make a strong brine with bay-salt, saltpetre, and pump-water, and put into it a rib of beef for nine days. Then hang it up in a chimney where wood or sawdust is burnt. When it is a little d...
-Salting And Sousing. Part 2
Hog's Puddings With Almonds Chop fine a pound of beef marrow, half a pound of sweet almonds blanched, and beat them fine, with a little orangeflower or rose water, half a pound of white bread grated ...
-Salting And Sousing. Part 3
Turkey Soused In Imitation Of Sturgeon Dress a fine large turkey very clean, dry and bone it, then tie it up like a sturgeon, and put it into the pot with a quart of white wine, a quart of water, the...
-Bacon
Cut off the hams and head of the pig, and, if a large one, take out the chine, but leave in the spareribs, as they will keep in the gravy, and prevent the bacon getting rusty. Salt it with common salt...
-Hams
Cut out the hams from the pig, and rub them well with an ounce of saltpetre, half an ounce of sal-prunella pounded, and a pound of common salt. Observe, that these quantities of salts must be allowed ...
-Sausages
Take six pounds of young pork, free from skin, gristles, and fat. Cut it very small, and beat it in a mortar till very tine. Then shred six pounds of beef suet very fine, and free from all skin. Take ...
-Chapter V. To Keep Garden Stuffs And Fruits
Preliminary Hints And Observations As the art of preserving garden stuffs and fruits from being injured or spoiled by keeping, is a matter of some consequence to the superintendant of the kitchen, it...
-To Keep Garden Stuffs And Fruits. Part 2
To Keep Green Peas Tilt Christmas Be sure to choose peas for this purpose thatare young and fine; shell them, and throw them into boiling water with some salt in it: let them boil five or six minutes...
-To Keep Garden Stuffs And Fruits. Part 3
To Bottle Green Currants Currants should be gathered when the sun is hot upon them. Strip them from the stalks, and put them into glass bottles. Cork them close, set them in dry sand, and they will k...
-Part III. Confectionary In General. Chapter I. The Preparation Of Sugars
To prepare sugars properly is a material point in the busi ness of confectionary ; and as some rules are undoubtedly necessary to be given in a work of this kind, we shall begin with the first process...
-Chapter II. Tarts And Puffs
Different Sorts Of Tarts In the eighteenth chapter of the first part of this work we have given sufficient directions for making of puff paste for tarts, and also the method of making tarts as well a...
-Tarts And Puffs. Part 2
Raspberry Tart With Cream Having rolled out some thin puff paste, lay it in a pattypan; lay in some raspberries, and strew over them some very fine sugar. Put on the lid, and bake it, cut it open, an...
-Tarts And Puffs. Part 3
Spinach Tarts Scald some spinach in some boiling water, and drain it very dry. Chop it, and stew it in some butter and cream, with a very little salt, some sugar, some bits of citron, and a very litt...
-Chapter III. Cakes
Preliminary Hints And Observations BefoRe you begin to make any cake, take care that all your ingredients are ready to your hand. Beat up your eggs well, and then do not leave them to go about any th...
-Cakes. Part 2
White Plum Cakes Take two pounds of flour well dried, half that quantity of sugar beaten and sifted, a pound of butter, a quarter of an ounce of nutmegs, the same of mace, sixteen eggs, two pounds an...
-Cakes. Part 3
French Biscuits Take a pair of clean scales ; in one scale put three new-laid eggs, and in the other the same weight of dried flour. Have ready the same weight of fine powdered sugar. First beat up t...
-Cakes. Part 4
Black Caps Take out the cores, and cut into halves twelve large apples. Place them on a tin patty-pan as closely as they can lie, with the flat side downward. Squeeze a lemon into two spoonsful of or...
-Cakes. Part 5
Apricot Cakes Scald a pound of nice ripe apricots, and peel them, and take out the stones as soon as the skin will come off. Then beat them in a mortar to a pulp; boil half a pound of double refined ...
-Cakes. Part 6
Little Fine Cakes Take a pound of butter beaten to a cream, a pound and a quarter of flour, a pound of sugar beaten fine, a pound of currants clean washed and picked, and the yolks of six and the whi...
-Cakes. Part 7
Seed Cakes Take a pound of sugar beaten and sifted, the same quantity of butter, the same of well dried flour, two ounces of carra-way seeds, eight eggs, a nutmeg grated, and its weight of cinnamon. ...
-Chapter IV. Custards
Preliminary Hints And Observations The greatest care must be taken in the making of custards that your tossing-pan is well tinned; and always remember to put a spoonful of water into your pan, to pre...
-Cheesecakes
Put a spoonful of rennet into a quart of new milk, and set it near the fire; let the milk be blood warm, and when it is broken, drain the curd through a coarse sieve. Now and then break the curd gentl...
-Chapter V. Creams
Steeple Cream Take two ounces of ivory shavings, and five ounces of hartshorn shavings, and put them in a stone bottle; fill it up to the neck with water, and add a small quantity of gum-arabic and g...
-Creams. Part 2
A Trifle Cover the bottom of a trifle dish with Naples biscuits broken into pieces, macaroons broken in half, and ratifia. cakes; just wet them all through with white wine, and make a good boded cust...
-Creams. Part 3
Raspberry Cream Rub a quart of raspberries, or raspberry jam, through a hair sieve, to take out the seeds, and mix it well with cream. Put in sugar to the taste, and then put it into a milk-pot to ra...
-Jams
Gooseberry Jam Cut in two, and pick out the seeds of green walnut gooseberries, gathered when full grown, but not ripe; put them into a pan of water, green them, and put them into a sieve to drain. T...
-Chapter VI. Jellies
Blanc Mange This jelly is made three different ways, the first of which is called green, and is thus prepared from isinglass : having dissolved the isinglass, put to it two ounces of sweet and the sa...
-Jellies. Part 2
Calf's Feet Jelly Take two calf's feet, and boil them in a gallon of water till it comes to a quart; when cold, skim off all the fat, and take the jelly up clean; leave what settling may remain at th...
-Jellies. Part 3
Red Currant Jelly Gather the currants, and strip them off the stalks, as before directed. Put them into a large stewpot, tie paper over them, and let them stand an hour in a cool oven. Then strain th...
-Jellies. Part 4
Flummery Take an ounce of bitter, and the same quantity of sweet almonds, put them into a bason, and pour over them some boiling water to make the skins come off; strip off the skins, and throw the k...
-Jellies. Part 5
A Hedge-Hog Beat well in a mortar two pounds of blanched almonds, with a little canary and orange-flower water to keep them from oiling; having made them into a stiff paste, beat in the yolks of twel...
-Syllabubs
Solid Syllabubs Put in a pint of white wine to a quart of rich cream, the juice of four lemons, and sugar it to the taste. Whip it up well, take off the froth as it rises, and put it upon a hair siev...
-Chapter VII. Preserving
Preliminary Hints And Observations IN making syrups for preserves, take care to pound your sugar, and let it dissolve in the syrup before you set it on the fire, as it will make the scum rise well, a...
-Preserving. Part 2
Red Gooseberries Take a pound of loaf sugar, put it into a preserving pan, with as much water as will dissolve it, and boil and skim it well; then put in a quart of rough red gooseberries, and let th...
-Preserving. Part 3
Green Codlins Green codlins will keep all the year, if preserved in this manner : gather them when about the size of a walnut, with the stalks and a leaf or two on them. Put a handful of vine-leaves ...
-Preserving. Part 4
Walnuts (Green) Wipe them very dry, and lay them in salt and water twenty-four hours ; take them out, and wipe them very clean ; have ready a skillet of boiling water, throw them in, let them boil a ...
-Preserving. Part 5
Mortllo Cherries Having gathered cherries when they are full ripe, take off the stalks, and prick them witha pin. To every pound of cherries put a pound and a half of loaf sugar.' Beat part of the su...
-Preserving. Part 6
Pine-Apples Take pine-apples before they are ripe, and lay them five days in strong salt and water. . Then put into the bottom of a large saucepan a handful of vine-leaves, and put in the pineapples....
-Preserving. Part 7
Apriots Having pared the apricots, thrust out the stones with a skewer, and to every pound of apricots put a pound- of loaf sugar; strew part of it over them, and let it stand till the next day; then...
-Chapter VIII. Drying And Candying
Preliminary Hints And Observations Every kind of fruit, before you attempt to candy it, must be first preserved, and dried in a stqve or before the fire, that none of the syrup may remain in it. Then...
-Drying And Candying. Part 2
Damson Cheese Having picked the damsons free from stalks, put them into ajar, tie white paper over them, and bake in an oven till quite soft: rub through a cullender whilst hot, and to the pulp and j...
-Drying And Candying. Part 3
Orange Chips Pare some of the best Seville oranges a-slant, about a quarter of an inch broad, and if kept whole they will have a prettier effect: put them into salt and spring water for a day or two;...
-Drying And Candying. Part 4
Peaches Dried Get the largest Newington peaches, and pare and stone them : put them into a saucepan of boiling water, let them boil till tender, and then lay them on a sieve to drain. Weigh them, and...
-Chapter IX. Elegant Ornaments For A Grand Entertainment
Floating Island Take a soup-dish, of a size proportionate to what is intended to be made; but a deep glass, set on a china dish, will answer the purpose better. Take a quart of the thickest cream, an...
-Elegant Ornaments For A Grand Entertainment. Continued
A Dish Of Snow Put twelve large apples into cold water, set them over a slow fire, and when they are soft pour them upon a hair sieve, Take off the skins, and put the pulp into a bason. Then beat the...
-Instructions For Carving
Meal The cook must take care that the butcher divides the joints of the bones of all carcase-joints of mutton, lamb, veal, and pork, which may then be easily and handsomely separated; but the art of ...
-Instructions For Carving. Part 2
Mutton - Haunch Is carved like venison Venison - Haunch Cut it across down to the hone, in the line a, b, c; and putting in the knife at b, cut in the line b, d. The fat lies between d and a, and...
-Instructions For Carving. Part 3
Goose Cut off the apron in the line a, b, c, pour in the sauce (see Sauces), and cut the breast in long slices in the line d, e; this will make the wings smaller, but more prime pieces may be thus ...
-Part IV. Made Wines, Cordial Waters, And Malt Liquors. Chapter I. Made Wines
Preliminary Hints And Observations Great care and precaution are necessary in the making wine, as it is frequently spoiled by mismanagement. If you let your wine stand too long before you get it cold...
-Made Wines. Part 2
Damson Wine Gather the damsons on a dry day, weigh them, and then bruise them ; put them into a steen that has a cock in it, and to every eight pounds of fruit put a gallon of water. Boil the water, ...
-Made Wines. Part 3
Currant Wine Let the currants be full ripe, and gathered on a dry day; strip them, put them into a large, pan, and bruise them with a wooden pestle; let them stand in a tub or pan twenty-four hours t...
-Made Wines. Part 4
Mulberry Wine Gather mulberries when they are just changed from their redness to a shining black, and be sure to gather them on a dry day, when the sun has taken off the dew. Spread them thinly on a ...
-Made Wines. Part 5
Cowslip Wine Take twelve pounds of sugar, the juice of six lemons, the whites of four eggs well beaten, and six gallons of water. Put all together in a kettle, and let it boil half an hour, taking ca...
-Made Wines. Part 6
Barley Wine Boil half a pound of French barley in three waters, and gave three pints of the last water. Mix it with a quart of white wine, half a pint of borage water, as much clary water, a little r...
-Made Wines. Part 7
Walnut Mead To every gallon of water put three pounds and a half of honey, and boil them together three quarters of an hour. To every gallon of liquor put about two dozen of walnut leaves, pour the l...
-Made Wines. Part 8
Balm Wine Take forty pounds of sugar and nine gallons of water, boil it gently for two hours, skim it well, and put it into a tub to cool; take two pounds and a half of the tops of balm, bruise them,...
-Made Wines. Part 9
Palermo Wine To every quart of water put a pound of Malaga raisins, rub and cut them small, and put them into the water; let them stand ten days, stirring them once or twice every day. Boil the water...
-Made Wines. Part 10
Milk Punch Take two pounds of sugar, and rub it upon six oranges and six.lemons, in order to extract the essence; put the sugar into four quarts of water : pare the oranges and lemons very thin, putt...
-Chapter II. Cordial Waters
Preliminary Hints And Observations When your still is a limbec, fill the top with cold water when you set it on, make a little paste of flour and water, and close the bottom of the still well with it...
-Cordial Waters. Part 2
Angelica Water Take eight handfuls of the leaves of angelica, wash and cut them, and lay them on a table to dry. When dry put them into an earthen pot, and put to them four quarts of strong wine lees...
-Cordial Waters. Part 3
Lady Monmouth's Treacle Water Take three ounces of hartshorn, shaved, and boiled in borage water, or succory, wood-sorrel, or respice water, or three pints of any of these waters boiled to a jelly, a...
-Cordial Waters. Part 4
Black Cherry Water Bruise six pounds of black cherries, and put to them the tops of rosemary, sweet marjoram, spearmint, angelica, balm, and marigold flowers, of each a handful; dried violets, an oun...
-Chapter III. Malt Liquors
The first thing to be considered, is, undoubtedly, the being provided with implements proper for the purpose, and of these the copper appears to be the first object. The position of the copper, and t...
-Malt Liquors. Part 2
It will also be indispensably necessary, in the preparation of your utensils, that the coolers be well scoured with cold water two or three times; cold water being more proper than hot to effect a per...
-Malt Liquors. Part 3
The copper-work, in process of time, like every thing else, will become defective; and when this is the case, the following very simple remedy will make the parts as perfect as ever: work the penstaff...
-Malt Liquors. Part 4
With respect to the time it should boil, experienced brewers proceed in this manner: They take a clean copper bowl dish, to dip out some of the liquor, and when they discover a working, and the hops s...
-Malt Liquors. Part 5
It is advisable to build your cellars for keeping liquors after such a manner, that no external air can get into them; for the variation of the air abroad, were there free admission of it into the cel...
-Malt Liquors. Part 6
If water happen to be of a hard nature, it may be softened by exposing it to the air and sun, and putting into it some pieces of soft chalk to infuse ; or, when the water is set on to boil, in order t...
-Malt Liquors. Part 7
With respect to the season for brewing liquor to keep, it is to be observed, that if the cellars be subject to the heat of the sun, or warm summer air, it will be best to brew in October, that the liq...
-Appendix. Section I. Considerations On Culinary Poisons
Though we have already, in different parts of this work, occasionally reminded the housekeeper and cook of the fatal consequences attending coppers and saucepans not being properly tinned, yet we shal...
-Considerations On Culinary Poisons. Continued
The substance of the pottery ware, commonly called Delft, the best being made at Delft in Holland, is a whitish clay when baked, and soft, as not having endured a great heat in baking, The glazing is ...
-Section II. Considerations On The Adulteration Of Bread And Flour
In the adulteration of flour, mealmen and bakers have been known to use bean-meal, chalk, whiting, slacked lime, alum, and even ashes of bones. The first, bean-flour, is perfectly innocent, and afford...
-Considerations On The Adulteration Of Bread And Flour. Part 2
To Make Leaven Bread Bread made without barm, must be by the assistance of Jeaven. Take a lump of dough, about two pounds of the last making, which has been raised by barm. Keep it in a wooden vessel...
-Bread And Flour Adulteration Considerations. Part 3
To Preserve Yeast Take a quantity of it, stir and work it well with a whisk until it becomes liquid and thin. Then get a large wooden platter, cooler, or tub, clean and dry, and with a soft brush lay...
-Section III. Proper Nourishment For The Sick
Mutton Broth Take the fat off a pound of loin of mutton, and put the lean into a quart of water; skim it well as it boils, and put in a piece of the upper crust of bread, with a large blade of mace. ...
-Proper Nourishment For The Sick. Part 2
Pork Broth Take off the skin and fat from two pounds of young pork, boil it in a gallon of water, with a turnip and a very little salt, till it is reduced to two quarts: strain it off, and let it sta...
-Proper Nourishment For The Sick. Part 3
Bread Soup Set a quart of water on the fire in a clean saucepan, and as much dry crust of bread cut to pieces as the top of a penny loaf, the drier the better, with a bit of butter as big as a walnut...
-Proper Nourishment For The Sick. Part 4
Brown Caudle Put four spoonsful of oatmeal, a blade or two of mace, and a piece of lemon peel, into two quarts of water; boil it about a quarter of an hour, but take care that it does not boil over: ...
-Section IV. Necessary Articles For Seafaring Persons
As pickled mushrooms are very handy for captains of ships to take with them to sea, we shall here give directions for that particular purpose. Wash the mushrooms clean, with a piece of flannel dipped ...
-Necessary Articles For Seafaring Persons. Continued
Directions For Steeping Dried Fish Every kind of fish, except stock-fish, are salted, or either dried in the sun, as the most common way, or in preparing kilns, and sometimes by the smoke of wood fir...
-Section V. General Observations On The Breeding Of Poultry
While families remain in the country, it will sometimes be expected of the housekeeper, that she should know something of the management of poultry. We shall therefore appropriate a section to that pu...
-General Observations On The Breeding Of Poultry. Continued
Turkeys Turkeys require more trouble to bring them up than common poultry. The hen will lay till she is five years old. Be sure always to feed themnear the place where you intend they should lay, and...
-Seasonal Fruits
January. - Pears, apples, nuts, almonds, medlars, services, and grapes. February. - Pears, apples, and grapes. March. - Pears, apples, and forced strawberries. April. - Apples, pears, forced cherri...
-Seasonal Roots And Vegetables
January. - Spinach, purple and white brocoli sprouts, cole-worts, savoys, cabbages, celery, endive, chervil, sorrel, pars-ley, beets, cardoons, tarragon, turnips, radish, rape, mustard, cresses, lettu...
-Seasonal Poultry And Game
January. - Pullets, fowls, chickens, tame pigeons, capons, turkeys, snipes, woodcocks, rabbits, hares, partridges, and pheasants. February. - Fowls, pullets, capons, turkeys, chickens, pigeons, tame ...
-Seasonal Fish
January. - Cod, crawfish, eels, lampreys, perch, tench, carp, sturgeon, skate, thornback, turbot, plaice, flounders, soles, oysters, prawns, crabs, lobsters, smelts, and whitings. February. - Thornba...
-Marketing Tables, From Threepence-Farthing To Fourpence-Halfpenny Per Pound, Etc
No. 3 Pence $ 3 Pence $ 3 Pence 4 Pence 4 Pence $ 4 Pence $ lbs. etc. 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 13 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 2...







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