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Milk Cream of Tomato Soup

Experiment 55

To determine the best method of combining ingredients in making cream of tomato soup. A. Use:

Milk

Tomato juice Salt

1/4 cup

1/4 cup

1/16 teaspoon

60 grams 60 grams

1. Combine by adding tomato juice to the milk. Why? Combine cold tomato juice and cold milk, heat hot enough to serve, and add salt.

2. Repeat 1, but heat slowly in the top of a double boiler.

3. Combine hot tomato juice, hot milk, add salt.

4. Add the hot tomato juice to cold milk, heat, add salt.

5. Add the cold tomato juice to hot milk, heat, add salt.

6. If one curdles badly, repeat, but add first to the tomato juice 1/32 teaspoon of soda. If none curdle, prepare 6 by any method desired. What is the effect of soda on the flavor? On curdling? Why may tomato juice cause the milk to curdle? Why may curdling sometimes but not always occur by some methods of mixing?

B. Use:

Milk

Tomato juice Flour Butter Salt

1/4 cup

1/4 cup

1/2 tablespoon 1/2 tablespoon 1/8 teaspoon

60 grams

60 grams

3.5 grams

7 grams

1. Make a sauce of the milk, flour, and butter; add cold tomato juice, and heat.

2. Repeat 1, but add hot tomato juice to the sauce.

3. Make a sauce of the tomato juice, flour, and butter. Add to the cold milk. Heat.

4. Repeat 3, but add the tomato sauce to the hot milk. Does the addition of flour lessen the tendency to curdle? Can cream of tomato soup be made without the addition of soda?

Results.