There are several reasons why some articles of food should be broiled, or why broiled food should sometimes be eaten. One important reason is that some articles of food are cooked most perfectly in this way. Another reason is that man desires variety in the manner of cooking his food, as well as in the articles constituting his diet. Broiling is a sudden searing and browning of the surface of the food. Cooking the food on the outside thus quickly hardens the albumen, and forms a coating over the surface, shutting in the juices, and the seared surface is kept intact by frequent turning as the food cooks. Broiling can be done over a clear blaze, or on a bed of live coals, but the use of the broiler or gridiron simplifies the matter very much. Where much broiling is done a charcoal burner is desirable, but for the ordinary family the light wire broiler or toaster is well adapted to the purpose. In order to use such a broiler over the fire in the common range or cook stove, have a clear bright fire, and open the main damper, so as to create a good draft and allow the escape of smoke.

Wedge Bone Sirloin of Beef

Wedge Bone Sirloin of Beef

To Broil a Chop or Steak

Remove one of the front griddles and place the article to be broiled in the broiler over the open fire. Turn the broiler frequently to prevent the meat burning, and to keep the juices from being forced through the surface, and also to cause it to cook evenly on both sides. If the drippings from the fat of the meat create a blaze remove the broiler a minute until the blaze subsides. A deep cover laid over the meat will retain the heat and facilitate the broiling. When the fire becomes dull, if coal is used, add a sprinkle of fresh coal, replace the griddle, and use the other side of the stove, which, having been protected from the air, will be clear and bright. Roth griddles should never be removed at once, because, in order to continue broiling there must be an opportunity to change the broiler frequently to a hot fire. A steak three-quarters of an inch thick will cook in eight minutes, and should be turned about twenty times. Such a steak, of course, will be rare, but Prof. Atwater says that raw meat is more quickly and completely digested than meat boiled, roasted, or smoked, but the flavor induced by cooking excites the secretion of digestive juices, thus facilitating the further disintegration in the alimentary canal. The above seems an argument in favor of acquiring a taste for rare meat if one desires the best results, as this combines the easy digestion of the raw meat with the rich appetizing flavor developed by cooking.

Short Loin. Beef

Short Loin. Beef

Experiment has proven that a steak one and one-half inches thick may be successfully broiled in a hot oven if seared on both sides before being placed in the oven. It should remain in the oven about eight minutes. If a steak is fat, butter does not improve it.