Now that croquet has become such a fashionable amusement, all who can must have their croquet lawn; and as turf is not always obtainable, by attending to the following directions a very good lawn may be had, instead of the beds of weeds and tufts of grass too often seen.

The essential point, by this mode, is to have the ground thoroughly clean, level, and firm, and in the choice of grasses suited to the soil and situation. Dig it over as early as convenient, as the longer it lies before being sown it has the less chance of subsiding afterwards. Roll it several times, when dry, during the winter and early spring, and fill up the hollows until the surface is level. About the beginning of March, or sooner if dry, rake it fine, and let it lie until the weeds germinate, when it should be carefully hoed. By doing this, we would hear fewer complaints against seedsmen for sending weeds instead of grass.

The following quantities are sufficient for an acre, but by using more seed, a close turf is formed sooner. The first or second week of April is a very good time to sow: -

Names Of Grasses

Light soil.

Medium soil.

Heavy soil.

Shady places.

lb.

lb.

lb.

lb.

Agrostis vulgaris (fine Bent grass), .

. 6

4

0

10

Trisetum flavescens (yellowish Oat-grass),

. 3

2

0

0

Cynosurus cristatus (crested Dog's-tail), .

. 10

13

16

10

Festuca duriuscula (hard Fescue),

. 6

8

10

0

Festuca ovina tenuifolia (fine-leaved Fescue),

. 4

4

2

0

Poa nemoralis (Wood-Meadow-grass) ,

. 3

3

5

8

P. nemoralis sempervirens (Evergreen do.),

. 3

5

6

8

P. trivialis (rough-stalked Meadow-grass),

. 3

3

4

0

P. trivialis parviflora, . ...

. 0

0

0

8

Trifolium repens (white Clover),...

. 6

6

7

6

T. filiforme (slender yellow Clover), ...

2

2

1

0

46

50

51

50

The above mixture may be modified to suit circumstances. For very dry places, use more of the Agrostis and both Fescues, and less of the others in proportion; and also by observing those which do best naturally in the district. In most of the Lawn-mixtures that I have seen, nearly one-half is Rye-grass. About the most that can be said in its favour is that it grows fast, a quality that is not wanted on a lawn, however desirable on the farm. Besides, it is not a permanent grass, as may be seen by examining any old pasture, when it will be found that the Rye-grass has disappeared and its place is occupied by others of a more permanent character. But whether its disappearance is caused by natural selection, or the short-lived nature of the plant, I cannot say; but that such is the case, is a fact of which any one can easily satisfy himself.

To insure a good turf, keep it always short, especially the first year. Kelso. A. B.