Among perennial herbaceous plants those which will furnish ornaments for parlor vases during the winter season, in the shape of Immortelles, are very desirable. We give here a sketch of one introduced a year ago by Haage & Schmidt of Erfurt, which, from their description, we judge would be very desirable. The A. margaritacea they refer to, is the Silver-leaved annual of our country, often seen to follow burnt woods; and if not quite so common wild, would be cultivated and esteemed.

It is a new species forming a dense compact branching bush about 10 to 12 inches high, out of which rise numerous heads of white flowers in dense corymbose clusters, appearing profusely on the ends of the flower-stems and on the many smaller side-branches. The plant is a perennial and probably just as hardy as the nearly allied Antennaria margaritacea, but, coming to perfection the first season when sown early, it can with success be treated as an annual. The neat charming globular flowers are sure to become great favorites among Everlastings, being more elegant than those of Antennaria used so extensively at present, and the plant is of much easier growth than the Australian Everlastings such as Helipterum, Waitzia, etc. It thrives luxuriantly in any soil, flowering in great abundance and needs no more care than Helichrysum or Ammobium. Where Everlasting flowers are employed this novelty is certain to be considered a very desirable and extremely valuable acquisition.

Gnaphalium decurrens.

Gnaphalium decurrens.