Some botanists have failed to find any distinction between Weigela and Diervilla, and hence we often find in catalogues our Weigela rosea, as Diervilla rosea; but Dr. Asa Gray has pointed out in his Botany of Rodgers Japan expedition, that there is very good reason for keeping the two genera separate. Dr. Gray has also shown that there is no good reason for making so many species. He would reduce all our garden forms to two, W. Japonica, to which W. rosea would be referred, and W. floribunda which we now figure; and to which he would refer the forms which go under the names of hortensis. We who are familiar with the raising of garden plants and know how they vary, would not only agree with Dr. Gray, but go still further and hazard a doubt whether all might not go under the name of W. Japonica. Still, as the varieties are very distinct in the eye of the lover of flowers, the names are useful, and the present W. floribunda will probably be one of the best known after a while. It has the richest color of all, being crimson, and when it makes a second growth, which it does on the slightest provocation, flowers as freely in summer as in spring. It has many names in nurseries, such as John Standish, Lavallee, and probably others.

It is surprising that though it has been known some years it is yet as scarce as though a wholly new plant.

Weigela floribunda.

Weigela floribunda.