In the year 1885, Mr. John C. Teas discovered among some Russian mulberry trees, one having a tendency of growth similar to a vine, running on the ground like a pumpkin vine, which attracted his attention. Being a practical nurseryman, he at once betook himself to budding some trees at standard height on some Russian mulberry, to test its weeping qualities. Some of the buds took so well that they grew to 2 or 3 inches that season. The following season the trees grew so rapidly that the limbs soon curved until in its downward tendency and growth it soon reached the ground. Every tree showing the same downward tendency. These qualities being ascertained, Mr. Teas next placed the propagation with the Messrs. James B. Wild & Bros., nurserymen, of Sarcoxie, Mo. At the twelfth annual meeting of the American Association of Nurserymen, Seedsmen and Florists, in June, 1887, at Chicago, by these gentlemen we were shown a one-year head, with branches touching the ground at 6 feet. Photos and stereo-views taken from specimen trees in nursery were shown, which attracted the attention of those desiring to see a new variety and type of weeping trees that would be much better suited to a diversified climate.

The leaves of this remarkable tree are beautifully lobed, of a bright green with gold edged margin in the fall. The branches are delicate as well as graceful. As to fruit - its berries are above ordinary size and almost seedless. So far as the lobing of the leaves are concerned, these will disappear as the trees get older; all mulberries have lobed leaves when they are young, and entire when of maturer age. This will be no disadvantage, as all the forms of the white mulberry are interesting, and this one will no doubt be a welcome addition to our list of weeping trees.

Teas' Weeping Russian Mulberry.

Teas' Weeping Russian Mulberry.