Some good poet essays to " thank the Lord for flowers;" but many a poor person of our large cities may thank the Lord for cemeteries, for without them hundreds would never own a flower. It has become a practice universal to plant flowers on the graves of those we have loved and lost, and hundreds in spring time may be seen with their few pots and baskets of plants wending their ways from the brick and mortar of the town to the little grave lots in rural cemeteries to plant flowers. Most of our cemeteries are now flower gardens, and many a lesson of rural art and rural taste has been first learned there. Sometimes these death-gardens are in the hand of tasteful lovers of the art, as at Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati. Here the silent lectures attract students of the highest class from all over the world. The highest culture may still profit by a visit to Spring Grove. But even the humblest burial places often present lessons that it is profitable to learn. The writer was recently in one in which almost all the evergreens were of American Arbor-Vitae. There must have been thousands of them planted everywhere. One would suppose that the effect of this exclusive use of a single evergreen would have given a monotonous effect to the whole scene. But it was not so.

Variety was afforded by the monuments, the enclosures, and the flowers on the graves, and the effect of the Arbor-Vitaes everywhere was no more tiresome than the everlasting use of Smilax in cut flower work, or of grass for the sward of a lawn. Indeed, for the first time in our experience, it occurred to us that the upright, semi-artificial Arbor-Vitae was in excellent keeping with the artificial monuments, making the graduation between the artificial and the natural true art so often hungers for, and that the effect was better for the employment of this one tree alone, than if an incongruous mixture to give variety had been used. In regard to architecture generally, not only will the effect be marred or aided by a consideration of the contour of the surface of the ground, as noted in our last, but by the character of the trees also. We give with this a view of the residence of C. P. Huntington, Esq., well known in railroad circles, at Throgg's Neck, which shows in a remarkable degree the good effect on the architecture of a number of straight boled trees.

The numerous straight pillars of the porte cochere and of the verandahs, the square walls and square windows, are admirably supported by the upright trunks of these forest trees.

The Huntington Homestead, Throgg's Neck: Residence of C. P. Huntington.

The Huntington Homestead, Throgg's Neck: Residence of C. P. Huntington.