Few trees are better known than the wild cherry. As a timber tree, it ought to have a preeminent place, for it is of great value in furniture, and is not far behind mahogany in the beauty of its appearance. For fire-wood it has few equals - and then there is that virtue so dear to the American heart, that it grows fast. We do not know of any serious disease that troubles it - and of no insect that makes it a special object of attack. The allied species, P. Virginiana, the dwarfer choke cherry, is subject to the black knot, but we have never known that this species has it.

We give with this, an illustration of a weeping variety that we think will be as popular as the Kilmarnock Weeping Willow. Though a seedling of a native American species, it made its appear-ance in Germany, and has been from there introduced into our country. We give the illustration in this department, as part of the history of a very valuable timber tree, though of course the variety will be in demand solely as an ornament to grounds as the willow is.

Cerasus serotina pendula.

Cerasus serotina pendula.