The genus Statice is a very curious one, having some relationship to the Plumbago of our gardens, which gives the name to the whole natural order, Plumbaginacea. The sea-thrift or sea-lavender is also pretty well known, and will give a fair idea of some of the generic peculiarities. They mostly thrive well in American gardens; even those that grow insandy, marshy places by the sea-shore, succeeding very well in ordinary garden soil.

This is a very bright-flowered species, a native, we believe, of Northern Asia, and named by Regel, of St. Petersburg, Statice superba, and which has been introduced by Haage & Schmidt. It will, no doubt, do as well in our gardens as those already referred to.

Statice superba.

Statice superba.

The above firm gives us the following account of it:

"The St. Suworowi which we introduced in 1884 has gained many friends, and we are justified in regarding this new species as one of the most remarkable of this interesting genus. As the annexed illustration shows, it differs conspicuously from the candelaber-shaped St. Suworowi by forming feathered or plumed flower spikes similar to the feathered Cockscombs. It grows to a height of from 18 to 24 inches, each plant producing a large number of beautiful spikes or plumes, and each of these spikes is composed of from 60 to 80 smaller plumes, of which the lower ones are about 3 to 4 inches long, while the upper ones hardly attain a length of a half an inch. The main flower stem rises 6 to 8 inches above the plume. When the plants begin to bloom, they resemble closely a handsome flowering Heath (Erica). The individual flowers are somewhat smaller than those of St. Suworowi, and vary in all shades of colors from pure white to deep rose; the foliage is deeply cut like that of St. spicata".