There is no time in the whole year but thought on the proper laying out of grounds is timely. The Seasonable Hints we have recently been giving seem so thoroughly appreciated that we are disposed to continue them awhile longer. We are very glad that they are aiding in the development of taste in this direction, for one of the highest pleasures of gardening comes as much from the proper arrangement 0 f grounds as from the beauty of the flowers or from the individual trees with which they are ornamented or by which they are adorned.

We desire to-day to emphasize a point made in our last - that in the planting of a place, too much thought cannot be bestowed on the future views which the trees may either enhance in beauty, or obstruct or depreciate if improperly arranged. The very same view may be made to look wholly different from the same property by a judicious arrangement of groups of trees.

Ashton; the residence of H. Maunsell Shieffelin, Yonkers, N. Y.

Ashton; the residence of H. Maunsell Shieffelin, Yonkers, N. Y.

In our last we gave a distant view of the opposite shore of the Hudson river. To-day we give another view of the same opposite shore, but yet, how varied! True, it is not from the same grounds. The view we now give is from the property of Mr. Schieffelin, but the variation would have been all the same if it had been from the same place, for it is chiefly the different styles of planting that produce the varied effects.

Again, one of the most. pleasurable features of gardening is the great contrasts that may be obtained from various methods of planting trees. At one time every thing was planted in straight lines. This was a leading element in the once popular Dutch style of gardening. Then came the natural style of gardening, in which straight lines of planting were nearly abolished. But there are many happy effects from occasional straight avenues. They are justified often by their own inherent good taste. And often they are justified by the happy contrast with other scenes. On Mr. Schieffelin's grounds this is very well illustrated. There is a broad avenue with a line of trees, and even those who have had little culture in the theoretical principles of beauty must feel that such a lovely natural scene as the one given of the Hudson river is very much enhanced by a previous drive up the avenue.

Avenue at Ashton.

Avenue at Ashton.

Distant View of the Hudson at Ashton.

Distant View of the Hudson at Ashton.

We continue to receive many complaints about the weedy and unsatisfactory nature of many lawns. The best method of getting a good lawn is to sod it with carefully selected blue grass sods, or sods of any other thick-set grass that can be had, and then to pay attention to weeding out any obtrusive plant that may want to compete for mastery. Often the grass of this solid character cannot be had, or the expense not justified. In this case we must sow seeds. Then it is wise to choose those kinds that grow naturally thick and stocky, so that they may crowd out any competitors. For this part of the world there is nothing equal to what is known as Green Grass, or, as it is called elsewhere, Kentucky Blue Grass. But when a lawn is to be made by sowing instead of sodding, careful attention should be given to weeding for a couple of years or so. Much of the complaint about bad weeds and bad grasses in lawns comes from neglect of early weeding.