In our last we gave some hints in regard to the laying out of grounds, looking to the effect planting might ultimately have on giving glimpses of different distant views, or of furnishing different aspects of the same view. As there noted, it is one of the great-est of the qua ifications of a land-scape gar dener in laying out a place, to secure this, and a qualification rarely possessed by even some of the best. In the hope that this talent may be cultivated, we again give an illustration of the same thought in a view taken on the grounds of "Pinkstone," the seat of John T. Terry, Esq., of Tarrytown, on the Hudson River. When we look at this beautiful view of the river, and bluffs beyond, we can readily imagine how much the beauty of the grounds would have been marred had it been wholly shut out by injudicious planting. And yet one can not go anywhere with-out seeing errors inland-scape planting, quite as egregious as this would be. It is, of course, scarcely credible that any one would deliberately plant out a bold scene like this; but there are innumerable features quite as handsome, where the error is continually made.

October Number 346 Flower Garden And Pleasure Grou 54Rear Lawn, Pinkstone: Residence of John T. Terry, Tarrytown, N. Y.

Rear Lawn, Pinkstone: Residence of John T. Terry, Tarrytown, N. Y.

In another view of these pretty grounds may be seen a group of Norway Spruce, which gives the opportunity to note how beautifully this tree is adapted to massing in landscape gardening. Some of the best effects are to be obtained by grouping; yet this also seems unknown to many who have otherwise good taste in arrangement. We have in mind a very beautiful place of many acres in extent, where every tree out of the thousands planted stands by itself. On an eminence they look like a scattered flock of dark sheep. There is on that place a good deal of belting arranged. When the trees grow up, there will be woods and open spaces for the sheets of grass. The distinction between the woods and the grass will be very well outlined; but the effect would have been beautifully increased if there had been some groups of trees on the open, grassy places - groups such as this one of Norway Spruces indicates. These groups of Norway Spruce harmonize particularly with architectural features. In the view on front page the tops of these Spruces are seen forming a background to the house in the picture, and add considerably to the beauty of the house.

Distant view from Pinkstone.

Distant view from Pinkstone.