The sketch we recently gave of the Madeleine pear, as in the line of making the reader well acquainted with kinds that have worked their way into favor all over the country, seems to have met with great favor. The tendency to illustrate that which is merely new is strong, but thousands never see more than the picture, for, before the owner of the first large stock of plants has basrely had time, in commercial phrase, to unload, the novelty dies. These experimences remind one of the quaint epitaph on a month old baby on an English tombstone:

Fallawater Apple.

Fallawater Apple.

"If so soon am I done for, What was I begun for?"

We have thought to do for some old stand-by among apples what we have done for the pear, and, on looking through Downing, note that he has no illustration of the Fallawater apple. We supply that omission now. Its popularity is attested by the fact that Downing quotes no less than sixteen synonyms, of which Tulpehocken, Brubacker, Beauty of the West and Fornwalder are best known. In Pennsylvania, where it was raised, no good orchard is complete without it. Its original name seems to have been Pfarrer Walter, its raiser's cognomen, but Fallawater is the acceptable name. In our last we noted that the Australians were using root-cuttings of the Northern Spy as a stock in general use for apples. This might do as well, for it is a very strong grower. The fruit is of enormous size and is very solid and heavy. This has been somewhat against it, as where trees stand by themselves winds are apt to blow the fruit off before ripe. The stem is also very short, and fruit has been known to press itself off by growth against the branch to which it is attached. These, we believe, are all its faults.

It is very sub-acid till thoroughly ripe, say in February, when its sharp character is mellowed and approved.